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Canon EOS 90D
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Mar 19, 2023 15:02:11   #
amfoto1 Loc: San Jose, Calif. USA
 
cindo51 wrote:
I previously shot with a Canon 7D, until it literally fell apart. Budgetary concerns prevented me from buy any of the camera on my wish list, but I find;;y chose this one.

Anyone else using this camera?


You would probably find this website very useful, to make comparisons:

https://cameradecision.com/compare/Canon-EOS-90D-vs-Canon-EOS-7D

I shot with a pair of 7D for five years. Great cameras. But when their "mileage" got very high I moved on to a couple 7D Mark II and they were even better.

Canon claimed the 90D was a replacement for both the 7DII and the 80D. While the 90D is a very nice upgrade in many respects, it hasn't replaced my 7DIIs. The primary reason I stuck with the 7DII is the autofocus system, which is the best Canon ever put in an APS-C DSLR. The 90D's comes pretty close, though.

90D would definitely be a solid upgrade from an original 7D, though. See the above web link for more details, but some high points...

32.5MP sense vs 18MP in 7D
10 frames/sec vs 8 fps in 7D
45 AF points vs 19 in 7D
AF is "f/8 capable", 7D's is not (this means AF will work a 1.4X teleconverter with an f/5.6 lens on 90D)
Higher ISO range.
Higher resolution, articulated "Touchscreen" LCD on rear of 90D.
Over 60% more shots per battery charge.
Anti-Flicker (mode that solves common exposure problems under fluorescent and similar lighting).

Something that's incorrect at the above web link: The 90D is not rated to give 200,000 shutter actuations. Canon rated it for 120,000. That's an improvement over the 80D's 100,000... But it's not quite as good as the 7D's 150,000 or the 7D Mark II's 200,000 click life expectancy.

Also, with the majority of lens and teleconverter combos, the 90D is "f/8 capable" only at the center AF point. Above link says 27 AF points, but that's only with one specific lens and one specific teleconverter (EF 100-400mm "II" with 1.4X "III"). There are a couple other specific combos that will allow more than a single AF point to function. But the vast majority of possible lens/TC combos that make for an f/8 effective aperture will be limited to the single point in the center (same as the 7D Mark II). Still, this is certainly usable and a step up from earlier cameras that were f/5.6 limited, including your 7D.

And, the above link says 90D can shoot at 11 frames/sec. Yes, it can... but only with it's AF "locked". If using continuous focus, the camera will slow to 10 fps. Frankly, I can't think of many instances where anyone would shoot at max frame rate with locked AF, so I think the 10 fps that I stated above is more "real world" accurate.

While the 90D is certainly a good, solid camera, I don't think it quite has the "pro" level build quality and sealing that the 7D series cameras have had.

Some more comparison links you may find useful:

https://www.imaging-resource.com/cameras/canon/7d/vs/canon/90d/
https://versus.com/en/canon-eos-7d-vs-canon-eos-90d
https://www.apotelyt.com/compare-camera/canon-7d-vs-canon-90d

I also highly recommend the detailed reviews at Bryan Carnathan's web site: https://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Canon-EOS-90D.aspx

Now I'm going to throw a wrench in the works. First, I presume you already have some EF mount lenses, either Canon or 3rd party. So I'm going to stick with Canon here, though there also are some other manufacturer cameras that may be worth consideration.

This may be a good time to consider "going mirrorless". You can do so at reasonable cost now that Canon has introduced some APS-C R-series cameras, which will in a number of ways out-perform your 7D and in some ways the 90D. Specifically I suggest you look at the R10 and R7, both with and without their kit lenses. The 90D body only is selling for $1199, for price comparison.

- Canon R10 body only is selling for $879
- or it's available with RF-S 18-45mm kit lens for $999
- or with RF-S 18-150mm kit lens for $1279
- (there's currently a $100 discount to arrive at the above prices)

Canon R10 is 24MP and it does not have in-body image stabilization (IBIS). It does share the superb AF system of the R8, R7, R6, R5 and R3. R10 uses a small LP-E17 battery that significantly limits it's shot per charge. The R10 can shoot at 15 frames/sec with it's mechanical shutter (same as R7) and up to 23 fps with electronic shutter, but has a top shutter speed of 1/4000. R10 does not have feature that closes the shutter to protect the sensor from dust when lens is removed.

- Canon R7 body only is selling for $1499
- or it is available with RF-S 18-150mm kit lens for $1899
- (Canon does not officially bundle the R7 with the cheaper
- RF-S 18-45mm kit lens, but some retailers might offer it)

Canon R7 is 32.5MP (same as 90D) and it does have in-body image stabilization. It uses the same larger LP-E6NH battery as 90D, but the mirrorless camera will not get quite as many shots with it (mirrorless cameras' electronic viewfinder uses more power than DSLR's optical viewfinder). It can shoot 15 frames/sec with mechanical shutter with top speed of 1/8000 and up to 30 fps with its e-shutter with top speed of 1/16000. It does have the feature that closes the shutter to protect the sensor when the lens is removed. Also, of all these cameras (other than the 7DII I'm using), only the R7 has dual memory card slots (both use SD memory in R7.... 7DII has one SD, one CF).

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/compare/Canon_EOS_90D_DSLR_Camera_Body_Only_vs_Canon_EOS_R10_Mirrorless_Camera_with_18-45mm_Lens_vs_Canon_EOS_R10_Mirrorless_Camera_with_18-150mm_Lens_vs_Canon_EOS_R7_Mirrorless_Camera/BHitems/1502488-REG_1708097-REG_1708098-REG_1707911-REG

You can use any EF mount lenses you already have on both R10 and R7, but will need an adapter to do so. Many people who have used adapted lenses on the R-series feel the lenses work better on the mirrorless cameras than they ever did on their DSLRs. There are some 3rd party lenses that don't adapt well (I know of a couple Tamrons, for example), but most of them work fine, too. In fact, Sigma is marketing some lenses with EF to RF adapters, specifically for this purpose.

There are a number of 3rd party manufacturer EF to RF adapters. In most cases they're worth consideration and can be much less expensive than Canon's own adapters. For example, the "plain" adapter from Canon costs $99.... while there are comparable from several other manufacturers for less than half of that. Even more extreme is Canon's "drop" in adapter where you can spend up to $530 (variable ND drop-in plus separately sold clear filter). You can get the same thing from Meike for $160 (adapter plus the same two filters). And many reviewers think the image quality with the Meike ND filter is better!

This may be a good time for you to switch to mirrorless, since you're looking at a replacement for your 7D regardless. Some options would be less expensive than replacing it with a 90D DSLR... while others would be more expensive.

Going forward, all of Canon's efforts are tied to the R-series cameras and RF mount lenses. They are phasing out the DLSRs and EF/EF-S lenses. They have already discontinued around 25 lenses. The 90D, Rebel T8i, 5D Mark IV and 1DX Mark III are all probably the last of their line.

Reply
Mar 19, 2023 15:19:38   #
rfarris1 Loc: Maryland, USA
 
I have never tried that. There are at least two Facebook groups dedicated to the 90D. You might try those if you are on Facebook.

Reply
Mar 19, 2023 15:38:28   #
Blenheim Orange Loc: Michigan
 
amfoto1 wrote:
You would probably find this website very useful, to make comparisons:

https://cameradecision.com/compare/Canon-EOS-90D-vs-Canon-EOS-7D

I shot with a pair of 7D for five years. Great cameras. But when their "mileage" got very high I moved on to a couple 7D Mark II and they were even better.

Canon claimed the 90D was a replacement for both the 7DII and the 80D. While the 90D is a very nice upgrade in many respects, it hasn't replaced my 7DIIs. The primary reason I stuck with the 7DII is the autofocus system, which is the best Canon ever put in an APS-C DSLR. The 90D's comes pretty close, though.

90D would definitely be a solid upgrade from an original 7D, though. See the above web link for more details, but some high points...

32.5MP sense vs 18MP in 7D
10 frames/sec vs 8 fps in 7D
45 AF points vs 19 in 7D
AF is "f/8 capable", 7D's is not (this means AF will work a 1.4X teleconverter with an f/5.6 lens on 90D)
Higher ISO range.
Higher resolution, articulated "Touchscreen" LCD on rear of 90D.
Over 60% more shots per battery charge.
Anti-Flicker (mode that solves common exposure problems under fluorescent and similar lighting).

Something that's incorrect at the above web link: The 90D is not rated to give 200,000 shutter actuations. Canon rated it for 120,000. That's an improvement over the 80D's 100,000... But it's not quite as good as the 7D's 150,000 or the 7D Mark II's 200,000 click life expectancy.

Also, with the majority of lens and teleconverter combos, the 90D is "f/8 capable" only at the center AF point. Above link says 27 AF points, but that's only with one specific lens and one specific teleconverter (EF 100-400mm "II" with 1.4X "III"). There are a couple other specific combos that will allow more than a single AF point to function. But the vast majority of possible lens/TC combos that make for an f/8 effective aperture will be limited to the single point in the center (same as the 7D Mark II). Still, this is certainly usable and a step up from earlier cameras that were f/5.6 limited, including your 7D.

And, the above link says 90D can shoot at 11 frames/sec. Yes, it can... but only with it's AF "locked". If using continuous focus, the camera will slow to 10 fps. Frankly, I can't think of many instances where anyone would shoot at max frame rate with locked AF, so I think the 10 fps that I stated above is more "real world" accurate.

While the 90D is certainly a good, solid camera, I don't think it quite has the "pro" level build quality and sealing that the 7D series cameras have had.

Some more comparison links you may find useful:

https://www.imaging-resource.com/cameras/canon/7d/vs/canon/90d/
https://versus.com/en/canon-eos-7d-vs-canon-eos-90d
https://www.apotelyt.com/compare-camera/canon-7d-vs-canon-90d

I also highly recommend the detailed reviews at Bryan Carnathan's web site: https://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Canon-EOS-90D.aspx

Now I'm going to throw a wrench in the works. First, I presume you already have some EF mount lenses, either Canon or 3rd party. So I'm going to stick with Canon here, though there also are some other manufacturer cameras that may be worth consideration.

This may be a good time to consider "going mirrorless". You can do so at reasonable cost now that Canon has introduced some APS-C R-series cameras, which will in a number of ways out-perform your 7D and in some ways the 90D. Specifically I suggest you look at the R10 and R7, both with and without their kit lenses. The 90D body only is selling for $1199, for price comparison.

- Canon R10 body only is selling for $879
- or it's available with RF-S 18-45mm kit lens for $999
- or with RF-S 18-150mm kit lens for $1279
- (there's currently a $100 discount to arrive at the above prices)

Canon R10 is 24MP and it does not have in-body image stabilization (IBIS). It does share the superb AF system of the R8, R7, R6, R5 and R3. R10 uses a small LP-E17 battery that significantly limits it's shot per charge. The R10 can shoot at 15 frames/sec with it's mechanical shutter (same as R7) and up to 23 fps with electronic shutter, but has a top shutter speed of 1/4000. R10 does not have feature that closes the shutter to protect the sensor from dust when lens is removed.

- Canon R7 body only is selling for $1499
- or it is available with RF-S 18-150mm kit lens for $1899
- (Canon does not officially bundle the R7 with the cheaper
- RF-S 18-45mm kit lens, but some retailers might offer it)

Canon R7 is 32.5MP (same as 90D) and it does have in-body image stabilization. It uses the same larger LP-E6NH battery as 90D, but the mirrorless camera will not get quite as many shots with it (mirrorless cameras' electronic viewfinder uses more power than DSLR's optical viewfinder). It can shoot 15 frames/sec with mechanical shutter with top speed of 1/8000 and up to 30 fps with its e-shutter with top speed of 1/16000. It does have the feature that closes the shutter to protect the sensor when the lens is removed. Also, of all these cameras (other than the 7DII I'm using), only the R7 has dual memory card slots (both use SD memory in R7.... 7DII has one SD, one CF).

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/compare/Canon_EOS_90D_DSLR_Camera_Body_Only_vs_Canon_EOS_R10_Mirrorless_Camera_with_18-45mm_Lens_vs_Canon_EOS_R10_Mirrorless_Camera_with_18-150mm_Lens_vs_Canon_EOS_R7_Mirrorless_Camera/BHitems/1502488-REG_1708097-REG_1708098-REG_1707911-REG

You can use any EF mount lenses you already have on both R10 and R7, but will need an adapter to do so. Many people who have used adapted lenses on the R-series feel the lenses work better on the mirrorless cameras than they ever did on their DSLRs. There are some 3rd party lenses that don't adapt well (I know of a couple Tamrons, for example), but most of them work fine, too. In fact, Sigma is marketing some lenses with EF to RF adapters, specifically for this purpose.

There are a number of 3rd party manufacturer EF to RF adapters. In most cases they're worth consideration and can be much less expensive than Canon's own adapters. For example, the "plain" adapter from Canon costs $99.... while there are comparable from several other manufacturers for less than half of that. Even more extreme is Canon's "drop" in adapter where you can spend up to $530 (variable ND drop-in plus separately sold clear filter). You can get the same thing from Meike for $160 (adapter plus the same two filters). And many reviewers think the image quality with the Meike ND filter is better!

This may be a good time for you to switch to mirrorless, since you're looking at a replacement for your 7D regardless. Some options would be less expensive than replacing it with a 90D DSLR... while others would be more expensive.

Going forward, all of Canon's efforts are tied to the R-series cameras and RF mount lenses. They are phasing out the DLSRs and EF/EF-S lenses. They have already discontinued around 25 lenses. The 90D, Rebel T8i, 5D Mark IV and 1DX Mark III are all probably the last of their line.
You would probably find this website very useful, ... (show quote)


Good info, but the OP is not asking which camera to buy.

Reply
 
 
Mar 19, 2023 20:27:24   #
cindo51
 
amfoto1 wrote:
You would probably find this website very useful, to make comparisons:

https://cameradecision.com/compare/Canon-EOS-90D-vs-Canon-EOS-7D

I shot with a pair of 7D for five years. Great cameras. But when their "mileage" got very high I moved on to a couple 7D Mark II and they were even better.

Canon claimed the 90D was a replacement for both the 7DII and the 80D. While the 90D is a very nice upgrade in many respects, it hasn't replaced my 7DIIs. The primary reason I stuck with the 7DII is the autofocus system, which is the best Canon ever put in an APS-C DSLR. The 90D's comes pretty close, though.

90D would definitely be a solid upgrade from an original 7D, though. See the above web link for more details, but some high points...

32.5MP sense vs 18MP in 7D
10 frames/sec vs 8 fps in 7D
45 AF points vs 19 in 7D
AF is "f/8 capable", 7D's is not (this means AF will work a 1.4X teleconverter with an f/5.6 lens on 90D)
Higher ISO range.
Higher resolution, articulated "Touchscreen" LCD on rear of 90D.
Over 60% more shots per battery charge.
Anti-Flicker (mode that solves common exposure problems under fluorescent and similar lighting).

Something that's incorrect at the above web link: The 90D is not rated to give 200,000 shutter actuations. Canon rated it for 120,000. That's an improvement over the 80D's 100,000... But it's not quite as good as the 7D's 150,000 or the 7D Mark II's 200,000 click life expectancy.

Also, with the majority of lens and teleconverter combos, the 90D is "f/8 capable" only at the center AF point. Above link says 27 AF points, but that's only with one specific lens and one specific teleconverter (EF 100-400mm "II" with 1.4X "III"). There are a couple other specific combos that will allow more than a single AF point to function. But the vast majority of possible lens/TC combos that make for an f/8 effective aperture will be limited to the single point in the center (same as the 7D Mark II). Still, this is certainly usable and a step up from earlier cameras that were f/5.6 limited, including your 7D.

And, the above link says 90D can shoot at 11 frames/sec. Yes, it can... but only with it's AF "locked". If using continuous focus, the camera will slow to 10 fps. Frankly, I can't think of many instances where anyone would shoot at max frame rate with locked AF, so I think the 10 fps that I stated above is more "real world" accurate.

While the 90D is certainly a good, solid camera, I don't think it quite has the "pro" level build quality and sealing that the 7D series cameras have had.

Some more comparison links you may find useful:

https://www.imaging-resource.com/cameras/canon/7d/vs/canon/90d/
https://versus.com/en/canon-eos-7d-vs-canon-eos-90d
https://www.apotelyt.com/compare-camera/canon-7d-vs-canon-90d

I also highly recommend the detailed reviews at Bryan Carnathan's web site: https://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Canon-EOS-90D.aspx

Now I'm going to throw a wrench in the works. First, I presume you already have some EF mount lenses, either Canon or 3rd party. So I'm going to stick with Canon here, though there also are some other manufacturer cameras that may be worth consideration.

This may be a good time to consider "going mirrorless". You can do so at reasonable cost now that Canon has introduced some APS-C R-series cameras, which will in a number of ways out-perform your 7D and in some ways the 90D. Specifically I suggest you look at the R10 and R7, both with and without their kit lenses. The 90D body only is selling for $1199, for price comparison.

- Canon R10 body only is selling for $879
- or it's available with RF-S 18-45mm kit lens for $999
- or with RF-S 18-150mm kit lens for $1279
- (there's currently a $100 discount to arrive at the above prices)

Canon R10 is 24MP and it does not have in-body image stabilization (IBIS). It does share the superb AF system of the R8, R7, R6, R5 and R3. R10 uses a small LP-E17 battery that significantly limits it's shot per charge. The R10 can shoot at 15 frames/sec with it's mechanical shutter (same as R7) and up to 23 fps with electronic shutter, but has a top shutter speed of 1/4000. R10 does not have feature that closes the shutter to protect the sensor from dust when lens is removed.

- Canon R7 body only is selling for $1499
- or it is available with RF-S 18-150mm kit lens for $1899
- (Canon does not officially bundle the R7 with the cheaper
- RF-S 18-45mm kit lens, but some retailers might offer it)

Canon R7 is 32.5MP (same as 90D) and it does have in-body image stabilization. It uses the same larger LP-E6NH battery as 90D, but the mirrorless camera will not get quite as many shots with it (mirrorless cameras' electronic viewfinder uses more power than DSLR's optical viewfinder). It can shoot 15 frames/sec with mechanical shutter with top speed of 1/8000 and up to 30 fps with its e-shutter with top speed of 1/16000. It does have the feature that closes the shutter to protect the sensor when the lens is removed. Also, of all these cameras (other than the 7DII I'm using), only the R7 has dual memory card slots (both use SD memory in R7.... 7DII has one SD, one CF).

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/compare/Canon_EOS_90D_DSLR_Camera_Body_Only_vs_Canon_EOS_R10_Mirrorless_Camera_with_18-45mm_Lens_vs_Canon_EOS_R10_Mirrorless_Camera_with_18-150mm_Lens_vs_Canon_EOS_R7_Mirrorless_Camera/BHitems/1502488-REG_1708097-REG_1708098-REG_1707911-REG

You can use any EF mount lenses you already have on both R10 and R7, but will need an adapter to do so. Many people who have used adapted lenses on the R-series feel the lenses work better on the mirrorless cameras than they ever did on their DSLRs. There are some 3rd party lenses that don't adapt well (I know of a couple Tamrons, for example), but most of them work fine, too. In fact, Sigma is marketing some lenses with EF to RF adapters, specifically for this purpose.

There are a number of 3rd party manufacturer EF to RF adapters. In most cases they're worth consideration and can be much less expensive than Canon's own adapters. For example, the "plain" adapter from Canon costs $99.... while there are comparable from several other manufacturers for less than half of that. Even more extreme is Canon's "drop" in adapter where you can spend up to $530 (variable ND drop-in plus separately sold clear filter). You can get the same thing from Meike for $160 (adapter plus the same two filters). And many reviewers think the image quality with the Meike ND filter is better!

This may be a good time for you to switch to mirrorless, since you're looking at a replacement for your 7D regardless. Some options would be less expensive than replacing it with a 90D DSLR... while others would be more expensive.

Going forward, all of Canon's efforts are tied to the R-series cameras and RF mount lenses. They are phasing out the DLSRs and EF/EF-S lenses. They have already discontinued around 25 lenses. The 90D, Rebel T8i, 5D Mark IV and 1DX Mark III are all probably the last of their line.
You would probably find this website very useful, ... (show quote)


You are amazing! I'm just getting ready to wrap up the weekend, and I just saw your post! Thank you for SO much information and good recommendations! I'm going to review everything you have 'given me' to think about tomorrow...and probably Tuesday and ...thanks again!

Reply
Mar 20, 2023 00:44:30   #
Doc Mck Loc: Terrell,Texas
 
I have a 90D and have used it a lot, for excursions around the ranch. Have a Tamron 18-400 on it which is quite a versatile lens for photos of opportunity. I have a number of options on cameras and put it currently at the top of the grab it and go camera. I also have a sonyrx10mk4 that I use a lot. When I dot feel real complex and need a quick picture of a bull a client want a better look at and grab the Sony. A little less complicated ,not much. I like them both. I’m trying to transition to an r6 and r5 , but keep going back to th 90d camera.

Reply
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