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Audyssey help with my Denon receiver needed (desired)
Nov 23, 2022 16:57:57   #
planepics Loc: St. Louis burbs, but originally Chicago burbs
 
Since I replaced my two front puny Polk satellites with a pair of Klipsch RP-600Miis I decided to use some thrift shop stands and make my system a 7.1. I went to Manual setup, Amp Assign and made sure I had 7.1 bi-amp selected and it showed my "new" speakers, but when I ran Audessey it didn't recognize them....kept on trying to do a 5.1 set-up. Any suggestions?

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Nov 23, 2022 18:16:35   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
planepics wrote:
Since I replaced my two front puny Polk satellites with a pair of Klipsch RP-600Miis I decided to use some thrift shop stands and make my system a 7.1. I went to Manual setup, Amp Assign and made sure I had 7.1 bi-amp selected and it showed my "new" speakers, but when I ran Audessey it didn't recognize them....kept on trying to do a 5.1 set-up. Any suggestions?


I think I understand what Audessy does, allowing you to create a custom EQ curve for your Denon system. What I don’t understand is how it functions with 4 different types of speakers. Does each pair have it’s own EQ curve for that amp, and I’m not sure how bi amping figures into that. Doesn’t the Denon have either 2 or 3 stereo amps plus a sub amp or output? And do you test each pair with a mic and pink noise or pulse source, or just adjust them by ear?

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Nov 23, 2022 21:42:01   #
planepics Loc: St. Louis burbs, but originally Chicago burbs
 
However it works, it ended up OK. I watched The Fifth Element (Atmos, 7.1 compatible) and it was pretty awesome. Even though Audyssey only tested 5 of the 7 speakers (plus sub) - I think the surrounds were the sides - the backs also worked when I played the movie. What Audyssey does, with the microphone, it figures out the acoustics of the room and the loudness of the speaker using a boing-y sound and then it adjusts the timing of each speakers output to compensate for distance from listener, bouncing reflections off walls, sound absorbing materials, etc. I might watch another movie or two this weekend (whether or not they're 7.1, because I THINK the AVR up-mixes, but I'm not sure). The Martian and Dances With Wolves I'm sure will sound great, whether 5.1 or 7.1. My new center channel is supposed to be here on Saturday and should be a drastic improvement over what I have now (4 3 1/2 inch woofers and a 1" tweeter vs 2 3" woofers and a 3/4' tweeter) I hope I can someday have a proper Atmos setup. To bi-amp the front speakers I had to use one of the height channel inputs (one set of binding posts bass or tweeter - forgot which - went there and the other set of posts went to the regular left and right front inputs. the Klipsch are the first speakers I've ever had that allowed you to put a separate amp on each cone. It actually allows for a little tighter or cleaner sound. Using the Denon in Pure Direct mode helps too. It turns off the front panel and video outlet and by-passes one of the processors for an unmodified signal. I've been using it while playing LPs (mostly jazz and classical, but I have everything from Michael Jackson (one record) to Kenny Rogers).

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Nov 23, 2022 22:01:29   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
planepics wrote:
However it works, it ended up OK. I watched The Fifth Element (Atmos, 7.1 compatible) and it was pretty awesome. Even though Audyssey only tested 5 of the 7 speakers (plus sub) - I think the surrounds were the sides - the backs also worked when I played the movie. What Audyssey does, with the microphone, it figures out the acoustics of the room and the loudness of the speaker using a boing-y sound and then it adjusts the timing of each speakers output to compensate for distance from listener, bouncing reflections off walls, sound absorbing materials, etc. I might watch another movie or two this weekend (whether or not they're 7.1, because I THINK the AVR up-mixes, but I'm not sure). The Martian and Dances With Wolves I'm sure will sound great, whether 5.1 or 7.1. My new center channel is supposed to be here on Saturday and should be a drastic improvement over what I have now (4 3 1/2 inch woofers and a 1" tweeter vs 2 3" woofers and a 3/4' tweeter) I hope I can someday have a proper Atmos setup. To bi-amp the front speakers I had to use one of the height channel inputs (one set of binding posts bass or tweeter - forgot which - went there and the other set of posts went to the regular left and right front inputs. the Klipsch are the first speakers I've ever had that allowed you to put a separate amp on each cone. It actually allows for a little tighter or cleaner sound. Using the Denon in Pure Direct mode helps too. It turns off the front panel and video outlet and by-passes one of the processors for an unmodified signal. I've been using it while playing LPs (mostly jazz and classical, but I have everything from Michael Jackson (one record) to Kenny Rogers).
However it works, it ended up OK. I watched The F... (show quote)


Glad you got it working are enjoying your new system.

Have a nice Thanksgiving

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Nov 24, 2022 09:31:35   #
kerry12 Loc: Harrisburg, Pa.
 
TriX wrote:
I think I understand what Audessy does, allowing you to create a custom EQ curve for your Denon system. What I don’t understand is how it functions with 4 different types of speakers. Does each pair have it’s own EQ curve for that amp, and I’m not sure how bi amping figures into that. Doesn’t the Denon have either 2 or 3 stereo amps plus a sub amp or output? And do you test each pair with a mic and pink noise or pulse source, or just adjust them by ear?


Maybe I'm wrong, but I thought you could only test with pink noise if you had a separate external equalizer. I'm an audio enthusiast but not quite an audiophile, and I'm not up on the latest an greatest. I have a Harmon Karden High frequency receiver and Polk lsi towers.

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Nov 24, 2022 09:53:38   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
kerry12 wrote:
Maybe I'm wrong, but I thought you could only test with pink noise if you had a separate external equalizer. I'm an audio enthusiast but not quite an audiophile, and I'm not up on the latest an greatest. I have a Harmon Karden High frequency receiver and Polk lsi towers.


There are a couple of ways to test. The classic was is with pink noise (equal power/octave). The downside is since it’s a continuous source, measurements are affected by standing waves and reverberations from walls, floor and ceiling in the listening space. Another way is to “launch” a fast (Dirac) single pulse into the room, acquire the initial pulse, and using a computer (usually a laptop) to FFT it into an amplitude vs frequency graph. That avoids the issue with standing waves and reflections. You can also look at the pulse’s subsequent reflections to gain further information about amplifier and speaker damping/decay as well as the room characteristics, such as how reflective it is, which may assist in room modifications to reduce reflections in a room that is too “hard” or “live”. The “boing” produced by the Audessy test sounds like the single pulse method. Other companies, such as my Yamaha receivers use the pink noise + a microphone method.

Too much information?

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Nov 24, 2022 10:16:26   #
planepics Loc: St. Louis burbs, but originally Chicago burbs
 
I'm just a home theater/audiophile wannabe but upgrade my system when I can. Dirac is pretty similar to Audyssey...similar concept but proprietary software/hardware from different manufacturers of AVRs. I can't put together an Atmos system (ceiling speakers) and everyone says "bouncy-house" speakers are the last choice of the three out there, so last night's addition of my old L/R speakers to make it a 7.1 system is the best I can do at this time without major structural changes. Besides, it's not my house until my dad passes (my mom died in May at 90 yrs 3 months to the day), so this will be the first holiday without her (59 yrs old for me, 67 yrs of marriage for my dad)). My brothers and possibly my sister and their spouses won't be around until around Christmas or New Years (but my sister is only about 35 min away in STL). Audyssey seemed to me to make my stereo sound better with whatever adjustments it made and classified my RP-600Miis as "large" and listening with them bi-amped in Pure Direct mode, I really don't even miss my subwoofer. I expect my new R34C by Saturday evening. I moved my phono and cable box this morning so the top shelf will be clear for the relative monster (5x6x26). Anyways nothing else on the market would fit - I'd have to get a whole new A/V cabinet or shelf and I didn't want that expense after spending a bit over a paycheck per speaker (and paying for next year's 60th birthday trip). I hope everyone has a safe and happy Thanksgiving

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Nov 24, 2022 11:58:41   #
kerry12 Loc: Harrisburg, Pa.
 
TriX wrote:
There are a couple of ways to test. The classic was is with pink noise (equal power/octave). The downside is since it’s a continuous source, measurements are affected by standing waves and reverberations from walls, floor and ceiling in the listening space. Another way is to “launch” a fast (Dirac) single pulse into the room, acquire the initial pulse, and using a computer (usually a laptop) to FFT it into an amplitude vs frequency graph. That avoids the issue with standing waves and reflections. You can also look at the pulse’s subsequent reflections to gain further information about amplifier and speaker damping/decay as well as the room characteristics, such as how reflective it is, which may assist in room modifications to reduce reflections in a room that is too “hard” or “live”. The “boing” produced by the Audessy test sounds like the single pulse method. Other companies, such as my Yamaha receivers use the pink noise + a microphone method.

Too much information?
There are a couple of ways to test. The classic wa... (show quote)


Interesting. I have a 10 band stereo equalizer that I use. You place a microphone at your optimal listening location and connect it to the graphic equalizer, then use the pink noise to adjust each band on both sides to get the flattest response you can on your bar graph. Then your room should be equalized for listening. At that point you can then adjust the treble , mid-range and bass using the equalizer and a favorite piece of music to adjust it further to your own personal preference. Thanks for the info. I lost my microphone in a move, so I just adjust by ear now.

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