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IR conversion
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Sep 22, 2022 21:35:55   #
trapper1 Loc: Southside Virginia
 
I was getting ready to send a US model Nikon D5600 long out for a full spectrum IR conversion. The possibility of the camera needing repairs down the line occured to me so I sent Nikon an e-mail asking what their policy is on repairing conveerted cameras. Their prompt, as usual, answer was that they did not perform repairs on a camera that had been converted. Now I have to mull over whether to go ahead with the conversion knowing any camera failure would mean I have blown the $6-800 dollarvalue of the camera and conversion , or continue with the slow filter in front method. I've had no problems withe camera and one thought is to first send it to Nikon for a checkup and repair before having the conversion but that could add an appreciable amount to the investment. I am beginning to believe that the risk of losing the investment due to camera failure is simply the risk I have to take to get into the game, a risk that anyone converting to IR has to accept.

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Sep 22, 2022 22:58:22   #
usnret Loc: Woodhull Il
 
Start by learning all the options you have available to be able to shoot IR. For one thing, you can simply have the mfgr. installed sensor removed and then use any number of filters on your lenses to capture a much wider variety of the wave lengths within the IR full, all WITHOUT slower shutter speeds! Granted you will pay more for the filters depending on the ranges you wish to cover. I highly recommend you google Rob Shea u-tube videos. If you are really serious about getting into IR then learn as much as you can before spending $$$ only to be frustrated with your end results. PS: Ckeck out Spencers camera.

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Sep 22, 2022 23:14:09   #
CHG_CANON Loc: the Windy City
 
You've hit on the problem of converting a new(ish) camera. Typically, IR is done on your oldest out of date camera as the final action before instead discarding or selling. An obsolete 24MP camera like the D5200 would be a better candidate to convert. Or, buy an obsolete camera that has already been converted.

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Sep 22, 2022 23:20:25   #
Boris77
 
trapper1 wrote:
I was getting ready to send a US model Nikon D5600 long out for a full spectrum IR conversion. The possibility of the camera needing repairs down the line occured to me so I sent Nikon an e-mail asking what their policy is on repairing conveerted cameras. Their prompt, as usual, answer was that they did not perform repairs on a camera that had been converted. Now I have to mull over whether to go ahead with the conversion knowing any camera failure would mean I have blown the $6-800 dollarvalue of the camera and conversion , or continue with the slow filter in front method. I've had no problems withe camera and one thought is to first send it to Nikon for a checkup and repair before having the conversion but that could add an appreciable amount to the investment. I am beginning to believe that the risk of losing the investment due to camera failure is simply the risk I have to take to get into the game, a risk that anyone converting to IR has to accept.
I was getting ready to send a US model Nikon D5600... (show quote)


If the D5600 is one of the cameras that is recommended for IR conversion, go for it. I have quite a few Nikon cameras and have never needed one repaired. You have already admitted that you do not need it for regular photography, and the value is going down steadily since the "mirrorless" are in favor. There is no going back on the conversion, and the value of your converted camera is nil! You are doing this because you Want to do IR photography, right?
I bought a highly recommended New camera years ago and had it converted. Very happy with the results. I viewed as a luxury I could afford; the camera has no other value.
An alternative is to buy a used camera from the conversion company and save your D5600 - meaning that you want to continue using it for years?
Boris

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Sep 22, 2022 23:24:44   #
Bridges Loc: Memphis, Charleston SC, now Nazareth PA
 
trapper1 wrote:
I was getting ready to send a US model Nikon D5600 long out for a full spectrum IR conversion. The possibility of the camera needing repairs down the line occured to me so I sent Nikon an e-mail asking what their policy is on repairing conveerted cameras. Their prompt, as usual, answer was that they did not perform repairs on a camera that had been converted. Now I have to mull over whether to go ahead with the conversion knowing any camera failure would mean I have blown the $6-800 dollarvalue of the camera and conversion , or continue with the slow filter in front method. I've had no problems withe camera and one thought is to first send it to Nikon for a checkup and repair before having the conversion but that could add an appreciable amount to the investment. I am beginning to believe that the risk of losing the investment due to camera failure is simply the risk I have to take to get into the game, a risk that anyone converting to IR has to accept.
I was getting ready to send a US model Nikon D5600... (show quote)


Lifepixel seems to be the best of the conversion companies. Check their website. They offer a number of older cameras for a very reasonable price. They will sell you the camera and IR conversion in a package deal. Then you will have a warranty from them.

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Sep 22, 2022 23:44:56   #
JimH123 Loc: Morgan Hill, CA
 
trapper1 wrote:
I was getting ready to send a US model Nikon D5600 long out for a full spectrum IR conversion. The possibility of the camera needing repairs down the line occured to me so I sent Nikon an e-mail asking what their policy is on repairing conveerted cameras. Their prompt, as usual, answer was that they did not perform repairs on a camera that had been converted. Now I have to mull over whether to go ahead with the conversion knowing any camera failure would mean I have blown the $6-800 dollarvalue of the camera and conversion , or continue with the slow filter in front method. I've had no problems withe camera and one thought is to first send it to Nikon for a checkup and repair before having the conversion but that could add an appreciable amount to the investment. I am beginning to believe that the risk of losing the investment due to camera failure is simply the risk I have to take to get into the game, a risk that anyone converting to IR has to accept.
I was getting ready to send a US model Nikon D5600... (show quote)


I recommend strongly to not convert a DSLR to IR. It makes much more sense to convert a mirrorless camera to IR. I started with an old Sony A55 SLR type camera. It works fine as a full spectrum camera, but auto focus is always a bit off considering that IR focuses differently than visible light which forces me to manually focus it.

My 2nd time into this, I modified an Olympus EM5ii to full spectrum IR. And the fact that it is mirrorless means that there are zero AF concerns whatsoever. Since the focus is done on the sensor, it is immune to the focus problems that bother DSLR type cameras. It has been a joy to use.

And used mirrorless cameras like this are not that expensive. I like the EM5ii over the EM5 first version because of the ability to use silent shutter which was added to the Mark II version.

The lens I use the most for IR on this camera is the Olympus M.Zuiko 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 II R. It is very inexpensive and seems to be immune to hot spots which I have found on other lenses. Here are a number of them at KEH.com: https://www.keh.com/shop/olympus-14-42mm-f3-5-5-6-zuiko-digital-zoom-lens.html

The filter size is 37mm and there are lots of inexpensive IR filters on eBay to fit this lens. But usually, I use a step-up ring and use 55mm filters on it so as to prevent vignetting when I go to full wide angle.

Also, this mirrorless camera is small and the lens is small, and it is easy to carry it around.

And one more thing. Turn it back into a visible spectrum camera, I just replace the IR filter with a UV_IR cut filter that removes UV and IR light, and suddenly, it is a normal camera again.

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Sep 23, 2022 07:12:53   #
Jeffcs
 
I concur using a mirrorless is the best for a whole host of positive reasons
I had an Olympus Pen-F converted to full spectrum
The reason why the Pen-F is it’s ease of different color/B&W settings
Seem the better the lens the worse the “hot spot” I keep the 14-423.5-5.6 II msc mounted all the time, both inexpensive on the used market
I used LifePixel for the conversion they were very helpful
As far the worry about “what-if” think about the enjoyment of the IR photography with out the need for filter slow shutter speeds requiring a tripod runnied shots because the wind was blowing hand held photography in the bright sunny middle of the day
I’m glad I converted

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Sep 23, 2022 07:35:11   #
sueyeisert Loc: New Jersey
 
Two places for conversion are Lifepixel and Kolarivision. I have used both. Check with them about camera conversions. There are cameras that don’t do an in camera white balance. I prefer cameras that do an in camera white balance as opposed todo if it on the computer. I love infrared so I would use a good camera with lots of pixels for infrared.

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Sep 23, 2022 09:28:22   #
47greyfox Loc: on the edge of the Colorado front range
 
I wouldn't let the risk of not being able to get factory repair for a future unknown problem stop me. I had a Canon Rebel converted years ago and didn't give down stream repair a second thought. You should be anticipating enjoyment rather than worrying about the unknown. But, if you must, you can contact someone like Rick Riggins of Discount Camera Repair (an independent repair tech in Colorado Springs) who will likely tell you that he'd still repair your D5600 down the road if need be. Bottomline, go for it!!

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Sep 23, 2022 09:33:25   #
dpullum Loc: Tampa Florida
 
First before spending lots of money see if you use IR often. I am very satisfied with my DIY conversion.

Kolarivision discusses selection of filters. Obviously all filters are desirable... so best to chose none "in-camera" and add filters externally... low-cost screw on filters**. Mine are 37mm. The conversion took about an hour and was simple 6 screws, and removing the "hot-filter" that shields the sensor from IR. The camera was an older Panasonic as discussed in the video.*** Screwdrivers are under $10, in fact, Dollar Tree has a nice set.

Filter attachment using a Step-Up Adapter Ring 30mm Lens to 37mm Filter Size from Amazon... grind off the 30 mm threads and epoxy to the camera. With this you can use any filter.

**https://kolarivision.com/product/kolari-infrared-full-spectrum-standard-ir-5-filter-kit
First class set at $129.

Remember, that while these cameras are not 20mp resolution, we have magic AI up scale programs to make them hi resolution clean of noise.

*** "Converting a Compact Digital Camera to Shoot Infrared Only - 1. removing the infrared filter"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frtQxryDTo8

Photo uses a color swap free plugin or you can with anguish do it in PS. Single click plugin is fast, easy.
http://www.flamingpear.com/older.html

520 nm IR and Color Swap Plugin
520 nm IR and Color Swap Plugin...
(Download)

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Sep 23, 2022 11:25:24   #
lamiaceae Loc: San Luis Obispo County, CA
 
trapper1 wrote:
I was getting ready to send a US model Nikon D5600 long out for a full spectrum IR conversion. The possibility of the camera needing repairs down the line occured to me so I sent Nikon an e-mail asking what their policy is on repairing conveerted cameras. Their prompt, as usual, answer was that they did not perform repairs on a camera that had been converted. Now I have to mull over whether to go ahead with the conversion knowing any camera failure would mean I have blown the $6-800 dollarvalue of the camera and conversion , or continue with the slow filter in front method. I've had no problems withe camera and one thought is to first send it to Nikon for a checkup and repair before having the conversion but that could add an appreciable amount to the investment. I am beginning to believe that the risk of losing the investment due to camera failure is simply the risk I have to take to get into the game, a risk that anyone converting to IR has to accept.
I was getting ready to send a US model Nikon D5600... (show quote)


Most people I know including my self convert older cameras that are long out of warranty. The company who does the conversion for you can probably do most repairs anyway. Or probably any independent camera repair company can do after conversion repairs. Since I have been doing photography in 1977 I have only needed a camera serviced once and that was for a good cleaning well beyond the sensor.

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Sep 23, 2022 11:38:45   #
Nicholas J DeSciose
 
Bridges wrote:
Lifepixel


This is the best idea. Lifepixel can
answer all of your questions

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Sep 23, 2022 11:47:09   #
SuperflyTNT Loc: Manassas VA
 
trapper1 wrote:
I was getting ready to send a US model Nikon D5600 long out for a full spectrum IR conversion. The possibility of the camera needing repairs down the line occured to me so I sent Nikon an e-mail asking what their policy is on repairing conveerted cameras. Their prompt, as usual, answer was that they did not perform repairs on a camera that had been converted. Now I have to mull over whether to go ahead with the conversion knowing any camera failure would mean I have blown the $6-800 dollarvalue of the camera and conversion , or continue with the slow filter in front method. I've had no problems withe camera and one thought is to first send it to Nikon for a checkup and repair before having the conversion but that could add an appreciable amount to the investment. I am beginning to believe that the risk of losing the investment due to camera failure is simply the risk I have to take to get into the game, a risk that anyone converting to IR has to accept.
I was getting ready to send a US model Nikon D5600... (show quote)


First of all, listen to those that recommend converting a mirrorless. With a DSLR they need to calibrate focus with whatever lens you use. With mirrorless it focuses on the sensor and no calibration is needed and you can use different lenses. I bought a used Panasonic GH1 and had it converted and I can use any of my M4/3 lenses.
Second, I’m not sure you understand what the conversion entails. If you do a full spectrum conversion they remove the IR filter from the sensor and replace it with clear glass. You still need the front filter to get the IR effect you want and you’re still looking at long exposures. Now it will be much more effective than just putting filters on a non-converted camera since the sensor IR filter is blocking much of the IR light you want. I’ll also add that Lifepixel did my conversion. They were great. One of the real benefits is that they include a half-hour zoom session to answer any questions and walk you through the initial processing. One of the most important things I learned is to use the manufacturers software to set the white balance before processing in LR/PS.

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Sep 23, 2022 11:49:57   #
SuperflyTNT Loc: Manassas VA
 
usnret wrote:
Start by learning all the options you have available to be able to shoot IR. For one thing, you can simply have the mfgr. installed sensor removed and then use any number of filters on your lenses to capture a much wider variety of the wave lengths within the IR full, all WITHOUT slower shutter speeds! Granted you will pay more for the filters depending on the ranges you wish to cover. I highly recommend you google Rob Shea u-tube videos. If you are really serious about getting into IR then learn as much as you can before spending $$$ only to be frustrated with your end results. PS: Ckeck out Spencers camera.
Start by learning all the options you have availab... (show quote)


I bought filters to fit the largest lens I use for IR and use step-up rings.

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Sep 23, 2022 13:10:15   #
chasgroh Loc: Buena Park, CA
 
...I still have my first two conversions, a D70s and a D300 and both served me well. But going mirrorless with a converted Sony A7 made all the difference in the world to me. I never had a thought about repairs, bought the A7 specifically for the conversion and it wasn't cheap. Love the results of the investment.

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