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A Question about British English
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Aug 5, 2022 09:52:03   #
jerryc41 Loc: Catskill Mts of NY
 
I'm fascinated by languages and accents. For the people of England, I have a question about the letter "H." Many English people pronounce that letter "haych," but only some of them. What I think is a funny combination is when the person - like one on TV - says "haych," but then he would say "eavy" instead of "heavy." Can you enlighten me on this practice?

As I said, languages and accents fascinate me. I often watch foreign language movies just to hear the language.

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Aug 5, 2022 10:21:15   #
gmontjr2350 Loc: Southern NJ
 
Right there with you. You can get lost in British accents, since they are regional.
I also enjoy Scottish and Irish accents.

George

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Aug 5, 2022 10:31:05   #
Ysarex Loc: St. Louis
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3Vx0VvcQyY

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Aug 5, 2022 10:32:37   #
jerryc41 Loc: Catskill Mts of NY
 
gmontjr2350 wrote:
Right there with you. You can get lost in British accents, since they are regional.
I also enjoy Scottish and Irish accents.

George


Yes. There is one computer guy on YouTube, and I must rely on CC to know what he's talking about. He has three "problems": he talks too fast, he doesn't enunciate, and he has a strong accent. His channel is worth watching, though. I wish he didn't have "Unboxing" in his title because he does mostly reviews and How-Tos.

https://www.youtube.com/c/mikesunboxing

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Aug 5, 2022 12:11:23   #
BigDaddy Loc: Pittsburgh, PA
 
jerryc41 wrote:
I'm fascinated by languages and accents. For the people of England, I have a question about the letter "H." Many English people pronounce that letter "haych," but only some of them. What I think is a funny combination is when the person - like one on TV - says "haych," but then he would say "eavy" instead of "heavy." Can you enlighten me on this practice?

As I said, languages and accents fascinate me. I often watch foreign language movies just to hear the language.
I'm fascinated by languages and accents. For the ... (show quote)

I know you like YouTube, here's one I think you might like.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=64myS6bmNsM&t=420s

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Aug 5, 2022 13:45:05   #
jerryc41 Loc: Catskill Mts of NY
 
BigDaddy wrote:
I know you like YouTube, here's one I think you might like.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=64myS6bmNsM&t=420s


Thanks. Here's another good one.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oV8_rdjok38

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Aug 5, 2022 14:01:54   #
therwol Loc: USA
 
jerryc41 wrote:
I'm fascinated by languages and accents. For the people of England, I have a question about the letter "H." Many English people pronounce that letter "haych," but only some of them. What I think is a funny combination is when the person - like one on TV - says "haych," but then he would say "eavy" instead of "heavy." Can you enlighten me on this practice?

As I said, languages and accents fascinate me. I often watch foreign language movies just to hear the language.
I'm fascinated by languages and accents. For the ... (show quote)


I've been all over England, Scotland and Ireland. I've heard many accents and pronunciations and also colloquialisms that don't transfer to other locations. Take "Geordie" in Newcastle. It almost qualifies as a dialect rather than an accent. We have friends in Cumbria, which also has a unique accent, who say that they can't understand what some people in Newcastle are saying, and it's just a hop, skip and a jump away geographically. I don't think there are any rules on this. People learn to speak from the people speaking around them. We once drove through Hawick in Scotland on our way to visit a donkey rescue place. We told our friends in Cumbria, and they pronounced the town's name as though they were saying Hike. There is much more variation in language in England/Scotland/Ireland than there is in the US.

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Aug 5, 2022 15:24:16   #
gmontjr2350 Loc: Southern NJ
 
therwol wrote:
I've been all over England, Scotland and Ireland. I've heard many accents and pronunciations and also colloquialisms that don't transfer to other locations. Take "Geordie" in Newcastle. It almost qualifies as a dialect rather than an accent. We have friends in Cumbria, which also has a unique accent, who say that they can't understand what some people in Newcastle are saying, and it's just a hop, skip and a jump away geographically. I don't think there are any rules on this. People learn to speak from the people speaking around them. We once drove through Hawick in Scotland on our way to visit a donkey rescue place. We told our friends in Cumbria, and they pronounced the town's name as though they were saying Hike. There is much more variation in language in England/Scotland/Ireland than there is in the US.
I've been all over England, Scotland and Ireland. ... (show quote)


I once read that the US Southern accent related to A British accent. I forget which one.
George

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Aug 5, 2022 16:31:31   #
therwol Loc: USA
 
gmontjr2350 wrote:
I once read that the US Southern accent related to A British accent. I forget which one.
George


Probably more than you want to read but informative.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_American_English

By the way, I grew up in Alabama, and even there, people make fun of others with extreme southern accents. The predominant accent where I grew up was a soft, lilting gentle southern accent, not the twangy accent you might hear in Appalachia.

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Aug 5, 2022 17:01:08   #
MadMikeOne Loc: So. NJ Shore - a bit west of Atlantic City
 
therwol wrote:
I've been all over England, Scotland and Ireland. I've heard many accents and pronunciations and also colloquialisms that don't transfer to other locations. Take "Geordie" in Newcastle. It almost qualifies as a dialect rather than an accent. We have friends in Cumbria, which also has a unique accent, who say that they can't understand what some people in Newcastle are saying, and it's just a hop, skip and a jump away geographically. I don't think there are any rules on this. People learn to speak from the people speaking around them. We once drove through Hawick in Scotland on our way to visit a donkey rescue place. We told our friends in Cumbria, and they pronounced the town's name as though they were saying Hike. There is much more variation in language in England/Scotland/Ireland than there is in the US.
I've been all over England, Scotland and Ireland. ... (show quote)


Newcastle, OMG! Newcastle. A few years ago, hubby & I were going through customs at Heathrow. The older customs agent didn't skip beat asking us if we were "taking an interpreter" when we told him our next stop was Newcastle. Since we'd been in Newcastle before, we immediately got his point. I speak a couple of languages in addition to (American) English, but Newcastleonian isn't one of them. It's just too hard to learn!

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Aug 5, 2022 17:08:56   #
therwol Loc: USA
 
MadMikeOne wrote:
Newcastle, OMG! Newcastle. A few years ago, hubby & I were going through customs at Heathrow. The older customs agent didn't skip beat asking us if we were "taking an interpreter" when we told him our next stop was Newcastle. Since we'd been in Newcastle before, we immediately got his point. I speak a couple of languages in addition to (American) English, but Newcastleonian isn't one of them. It's just too hard to learn!


I mentioned in another thread that we had so much trouble understanding a server in a restaurant in Newcastle that someone else had to come over to help us. We haven't been over there since 2019 (pandemic), but we're likely to go back and deal with that unpleasantness again. We fly into Newcastle because of its proximity to Cumbria and specifically the Lake District. The other choice would be Manchester, but we've not had good experiences with the car rental companies there.

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Aug 5, 2022 18:05:54   #
dancers Loc: melbourne.victoria, australia
 
down here.......we say Aitch.

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Aug 5, 2022 23:46:13   #
bikinkawboy Loc: north central Missouri
 
I’m in Missouri. In Chicago people would mention my southern accent. In Florida I was a damn Yankee. I guess it’s all perspective.

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Aug 6, 2022 08:10:54   #
sodapop Loc: Belcamp, MD
 
jerryc41 wrote:
I'm fascinated by languages and accents. For the people of England, I have a question about the letter "H." Many English people pronounce that letter "haych," but only some of them. What I think is a funny combination is when the person - like one on TV - says "haych," but then he would say "eavy" instead of "heavy." Can you enlighten me on this practice?

As I said, languages and accents fascinate me. I often watch foreign language movies just to hear the language.
I'm fascinated by languages and accents. For the ... (show quote)


Interesting. One of the main themes in "My Fair Lady", is Liza's pronunciation of "H"

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Aug 6, 2022 08:12:04   #
PaulBrit Loc: Merlin, Southern Oregon
 
This is an interesting thread. My contribution follows.

I was born in London in 1944. In 1968 I emigrated to Sydney, Australia on a ten pound ‘POM’ ticket (but one had to stay for a minimum of 2 years). Within 3 days I had a job as a phone salesman. Within 2 weeks I had put on a rather poor Australian accent because prior to that some people were putting the phone down saying: “I’m not speaking to a Pommie bastard”.

In December, 2007 I met a wonderful woman in San Carlos, Mx. Her American husband had died in 2005. We fell in love. Jean was born in London! I left England and went to live with Jean in 2008. In 2010 we came north to Arizona to be married and settle down in Payson.

In 2012 we came to Oregon and just love it.

Ten years later when we are out and about strangers we meet still come up and say to me: “Oh, I just love your accent!”

My London accent is alive and well!

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