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Post-Processing Digital Images
Remove Light Reflection
Jun 8, 2022 19:54:02   #
ChrisKet Loc: Orange, CA
 
I took this photo with my iPhone at my niece's wedding earlier this year, just because I liked the shadows, lights and outside colors. I'm having an issue because I don't like the reflection of light in the window and was wondering if someone could provide me with some direction in how to remove it.

My most used app is Lightroom Classic, but I am dipping my toe more into Photoshop; so hints using either of those would be appreciated.


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Jun 8, 2022 20:29:14   #
kpmac Loc: Ragley, La
 
I don't know what processing software you use but perhaps you could use some local adjustment brushes and a little cloning.

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Jun 9, 2022 06:44:39   #
IHH61 Loc: Homestead Fl
 
I would start with trying brush mask in Lightroom with lots of dehaze then to Photoshop and use the content aware fill and clone tools.

Hugh

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Jun 9, 2022 11:13:03   #
R.G. Loc: Scotland
 
Cloning is usually the best answer but sometimes there's a limit to how much of the good stuff is available for patches. One answer is to do it in small steps and as your cloning produces a larger area of the "good stuff" you can increase the size of your patches.

Sometimes you have to use a patch that's got unwanted stuff in it, but you can eliminate the unwanted stuff later. That means cloning over clones - which you can do by typing "H" which hides the previous clone work. You can then create new clone work without the previous patches getting in the way. Typing H again restores all clone outlines.

There are also photoshop techniques using layers and masking but I'm not familiar with that approach. In extreme situations you could use a mixture of cloning and Adjustment Brush work, in which case I recommend doing as much cloning as you can first. If you clone over stuff that's been adjusted with the brush it can produce funny effects like stuff that you're cloning over showing through the patches even when opacity is set to 100%.
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Jun 9, 2022 12:21:54   #
ChrisKet Loc: Orange, CA
 
R.G. wrote:
Cloning is usually the best answer but sometimes there's a limit to how much of the good stuff is available for patches. One answer is to do it in small steps and as your cloning produces a larger area of the "good stuff" you can increase the size of your patches.

Sometimes you have to use a patch that's got unwanted stuff in it, but you can eliminate the unwanted stuff later. That means cloning over clones - which you can do by typing "H" which hides the previous clone work. You can then create new clone work without the previous patches getting in the way. Typing H again restores all clone outlines.

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Cloning is usually the best answer but sometimes t... (show quote)


Thanks for this tidbit…I think it was the hidden gem I was really looking for.

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Post-Processing Digital Images
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