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IRND Filter
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May 14, 2022 11:13:47   #
Bridges Loc: Memphis, Charleston SC, now Nazareth PA
 
Does anyone have and use one of these. What results do you get?

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May 14, 2022 11:26:22   #
jcboy3
 
Bridges wrote:
Does anyone have and use one of these. What results do you get?


The IRND filter adds an IR cut filter to the ND filter.

If your ND filter is made of glass, it will attenuate infrared as well as visible light. An IR Cut filter will essentially elliminate infrared, but in my experience is of little use.

If your ND filter is made of plastic or resin, then it will pass infrared light and cause problems with your image. In this case, an IR Cut filter will help.

An IRND filter can be an inexpensive filter, because it can use plastic or resin and still eliminate infrared.

For the most part, this is not an issue until you get to 6-stop and beyond.

My recommendation is to simply buy good quality glass ND filters for high-stop filtering, for this and other image quality reasons.

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May 14, 2022 12:00:28   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
As with any photographic tool, it has its uses.
--Bob
Bridges wrote:
Does anyone have and use one of these. What results do you get?

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May 14, 2022 12:12:38   #
JohnSwanda Loc: San Francisco
 
Don't almost all current digital cameras have an internal IR cut filter? Then what is the advantage of adding it to a ND filter?

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May 14, 2022 14:00:29   #
jcboy3
 
JohnSwanda wrote:
Don't almost all current digital cameras have an internal IR cut filter? Then what is the advantage of adding it to a ND filter?


You can take infrared photos by putting an IR filter on the camera. Large Stop ND filters that pass IR are similar.

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May 14, 2022 14:37:38   #
JohnSwanda Loc: San Francisco
 
jcboy3 wrote:
You can take infrared photos by putting an IR filter on the camera. Large Stop ND filters that pass IR are similar.


I thought we were talking about ND filters which block IR light. If you use an IR filter on a camera which still has the internal IR blocking filter, the exposure times will be very long.

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May 14, 2022 14:46:56   #
jcboy3
 
JohnSwanda wrote:
I thought we were talking about ND filters which block IR light. If you use an IR filter on a camera which still has the internal IR blocking filter, the exposure times will be very long.


The point is that ND filters made with glass block IR, whereas ND filters made with plastic or resin do not block IR (and thus need IR cut filters for long exposures). Which can be a problem with 6-stop or darker ND filters.

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May 14, 2022 15:19:45   #
JohnSwanda Loc: San Francisco
 
jcboy3 wrote:
The point is that ND filters made with glass block IR, whereas ND filters made with plastic or resin do not block IR (and thus need IR cut filters for long exposures). Which can be a problem with 6-stop or darker ND filters.


Which leads us back to my original question: Since current digital cameras all have internal IR cut filters, why does an ND filter need one?

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May 14, 2022 15:27:53   #
User ID
 
jcboy3 wrote:
The point is that ND filters made with glass block IR, whereas ND filters made with plastic or resin do not block IR (and thus need IR cut filters for long exposures). Which can be a problem with 6-stop or darker ND filters.

Theres an enormous amount of glass in the lens, as compared to a glass filter, so how could it actually matter whether the filter is made of resin or glass ???

OTOH if glass blocks IR why is there an internal IR cut filter in the camera ???

And if glass really blocks IR then how can IR photography, film or digital, even be possible at all ???

This all smells like confusion with very short wave UV which is blocked by glass and requires non glass optics such as the Zeiss quartz optics for Hasselblad.

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May 14, 2022 15:29:21   #
jcboy3
 
JohnSwanda wrote:
Which leads us back to my original question: Since current digital cameras all have internal IR cut filters, why does an ND filter need one?


As I said, you can still take infrared pictures with a digital camera that has an IR cut filter over the sensor, by putting an IR pass filter on the camera and taking very long exposures. An ND filter that does not cut IR will have the same effect. Using 6-stop or greater ND filters that pass IR with long exposure times will result in IR contamination of the exposure.

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May 14, 2022 16:02:48   #
User ID
 
JohnSwanda wrote:
Which leads us back to my original question: Since current digital cameras all have internal IR cut filters, why does an ND filter need one?

I suspect that you would be far less puzzled if you check jcboys thread authoring record. Its ... uhmnn ... reeeeally remarkable. (Remarkable regardless of whether you agree or disagree with his content.)

Having done so, I would strongly recommend that you "Consider the source". See for your own self why nothing makes sense.


(Download)

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May 14, 2022 16:56:54   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
I guess we can discuss how many angels can dance on a pinhead or show something substantial. This was shot with a no ND but a 780IR filter, non-modified D800e, 50mm Zeiss Planar.
--Bob
Bridges wrote:
Does anyone have and use one of these. What results do you get?


(Download)

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May 15, 2022 08:43:00   #
Canisdirus
 
Newer cameras do not need an IR cut on ND filters.

Works for older cameras.

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May 15, 2022 08:45:32   #
jcboy3
 
User ID wrote:
I suspect that you would be far less puzzled if you check jcboys thread authoring record. Its ... uhmnn ... reeeeally remarkable. (Remarkable regardless of whether you agree or disagree with his content.)

Having done so, I would strongly recommend that you "Consider the source". See for your own self why nothing makes sense.

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May 15, 2022 08:48:20   #
jcboy3
 
Canisdirus wrote:
Newer cameras do not need an IR cut on ND filters.

Works for older cameras.


Once again, plastic or resin ND filters do not filter IR, which for long exposures at high stops will result in IR contamination of the image.

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