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Grainy photos
Feb 10, 2022 09:24:40   #
sourdough58 Loc: Maine
 
I do home inspections mostly with a Canon SX50 HS camera, binoculars, and drone I am primarily looking for openings, signs of chewing, and signs of entry, some are very obvious and some I can identify because of 30yrs of experience. Most of the entry points are in shaded dark areas and that leaves me with grainy photos, however, with my Nikon binoculars, I can see quite clearly with no grainy texture. is there anything or a program like "Focus" that would allow me to improve the photos? when I send a proposal I have arrows and comments on the photos. I take 20 - 50 photos and enlarge and remove shadows and look for signs of entry, this photo is of a ridge vent, thank you



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Feb 10, 2022 09:48:52   #
sippyjug104 Loc: Missouri
 
Magnification, as well as enlargement by cropping, is not the same as resolution. It is the ability to resolve and show detail in what we desire that is important.

This image is one of extremely high contrast with a dynamic range of pure white to nearly pure black and not much in between. A better choice of exposure would be your friend in this situation. I must guess that you were a distance away and that you zoomed in the lens to see the open ridge vent and then cropped the image in post-processing to enlarge it. With a 16mp camera, much of it may have been cropped away leaving far too little pixel density. Other issues such as missed autofocus and camera shake could attribute or add to the blur.

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Feb 10, 2022 10:36:59   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
Another thing I’d add which you already know is that the area of interest is very underexposed. You might find that a strong flash, possibly with an attachment like a Better Beamer would allow you to light those areas. Also, a newer camera with a wider dynamic range might allow you to expose for the shadows and still have enough DR not to blow out the lighter areas. I see the noise/grain as a much lesser issue than the exposure, but a camera with a higher resolution sensor would allow you to crop more aggressively with less noise, and you can use tools such as Topaz Or Nik’s noise reduction tools to help. Unfortunately none of the things I’ve suggested are free, so some investment may be required, but I’d start with the flash and the Beamer and see if you can get enough light on the subject to address the issue.

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Feb 10, 2022 11:55:53   #
SuperflyTNT Loc: Manassas VA
 
I don’t know that camera but I’m assuming it’s not a big deal if the highlights are blown if you’re trying to see what’s in the shadow detail. If the camera has spot metering you can try that. If not and you have exposure compensation then push it until you can see the detail.

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Feb 10, 2022 12:59:02   #
joecichjr Loc: Chicago S. Suburbs, Illinois, USA
 
sourdough58 wrote:
I do home inspections mostly with a Canon SX50 HS camera, binoculars, and drone I am primarily looking for openings, signs of chewing, and signs of entry, some are very obvious and some I can identify because of 30yrs of experience. Most of the entry points are in shaded dark areas and that leaves me with grainy photos, however, with my Nikon binoculars, I can see quite clearly with no grainy texture. is there anything or a program like "Focus" that would allow me to improve the photos? when I send a proposal I have arrows and comments on the photos. I take 20 - 50 photos and enlarge and remove shadows and look for signs of entry, this photo is of a ridge vent, thank you
I do home inspections mostly with a Canon SX50 HS ... (show quote)


🆒🆒🆒🆒🆒🌀

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Feb 10, 2022 13:43:18   #
R.G. Loc: Scotland
 
SuperflyTNT wrote:
....If the camera has spot metering you can try that....


Or centre weighted. The SX50 has a very small sensor which doesn't handle that sort of situation very well. As suggested, a larger, newer sensor would help.

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Feb 10, 2022 20:14:54   #
OldSchool-WI Loc: Brandon, Wisconsin 53919
 
sourdough58 wrote:
I do home inspections mostly with a Canon SX50 HS camera, binoculars, and drone I am primarily looking for openings, signs of chewing, and signs of entry, some are very obvious and some I can identify because of 30yrs of experience. Most of the entry points are in shaded dark areas and that leaves me with grainy photos, however, with my Nikon binoculars, I can see quite clearly with no grainy texture. is there anything or a program like "Focus" that would allow me to improve the photos? when I send a proposal I have arrows and comments on the photos. I take 20 - 50 photos and enlarge and remove shadows and look for signs of entry, this photo is of a ridge vent, thank you
I do home inspections mostly with a Canon SX50 HS ... (show quote)


_________________________
Even though inexpensive, the SX50 has reasonably good specs and 12mpixels which should give a high definition photo. But indeed the photo you posted is horrible. Play around with the menu---cut the contrast--up the saturation--but maybe there no color. Obviously flash is not needed in what I saw. Do you want to see into the louvers? Then bring an umbrella to shade the bright light which is blowing out the highlights. But you shouldn't need expensive software---but to take a better picture is needed. No camera has the dynamic range and adjustment of the human eye.----ew

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Feb 11, 2022 07:47:25   #
jaymatt Loc: Alexandria, Indiana
 
Try Topaz Denoise AI

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Feb 11, 2022 09:28:18   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
jaymatt wrote:
Try Topaz Denoise AI


I agree, but although the OP complained of noise, the real issue I see is underexposure of the area of interest inside the ridge vent opening. Having to bring up the brightness in post (which is the reason for the blown sky) is just exacerbating the issue, and truth be told, the camera being used has neither the DR or noise specs of newer technology to image deep shadows (almost darkness) well. Hence the reason I suggested a flash directed at and to illuminate the area of interest as one of the least expensive remedies in addition to Topaz (who make some very effective products).

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Feb 11, 2022 09:42:46   #
cascom Loc: Redmond
 
Shoot in RAW and use ON1nonoise

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Feb 11, 2022 13:51:05   #
SuperflyTNT Loc: Manassas VA
 
TriX wrote:
I agree, but although the OP complained of noise, the real issue I see is underexposure of the area of interest inside the ridge vent opening. Having to bring up the brightness in post (which is the reason for the blown sky) is just exacerbating the issue, and truth be told, the camera being used has neither the DR or noise specs of newer technology to image deep shadows (almost darkness) well. Hence the reason I suggested a flash directed at and to illuminate the area of interest as one of the least expensive remedies in addition to Topaz (who make some very effective products).
I agree, but although the OP complained of noise, ... (show quote)


Which is also why I suggested spot metering or EC. With that small sensor there’s no way to avoid grain if that area is underexposed.

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Feb 11, 2022 21:00:11   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
Using ETTR/EBTR techniques will help mask the graininess of the images.
--Bob
sourdough58 wrote:
I do home inspections mostly with a Canon SX50 HS camera, binoculars, and drone I am primarily looking for openings, signs of chewing, and signs of entry, some are very obvious and some I can identify because of 30yrs of experience. Most of the entry points are in shaded dark areas and that leaves me with grainy photos, however, with my Nikon binoculars, I can see quite clearly with no grainy texture. is there anything or a program like "Focus" that would allow me to improve the photos? when I send a proposal I have arrows and comments on the photos. I take 20 - 50 photos and enlarge and remove shadows and look for signs of entry, this photo is of a ridge vent, thank you
I do home inspections mostly with a Canon SX50 HS ... (show quote)

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Feb 12, 2022 23:45:28   #
sourdough58 Loc: Maine
 
Thank you all for your comments and suggestions, I am going to do some research on each one. Instead of a strong flash would using a big mirror on a tripod to light the area in question work? I may need to get a new camera. again I really appreciate your comments and suggestions.

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Feb 12, 2022 23:58:51   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
sourdough58 wrote:
Thank you all for your comments and suggestions, I am going to do some research on each one. Instead of a strong flash would using a big mirror on a tripod to light the area in question work? I may need to get a new camera. again I really appreciate your comments and suggestions.


You may find that a piece of foil backed white foam board rigid insulation is less expensive than a mirror - you can use either side depending on your preference, but you’ll need to get it relatively close to be effective, and then there’s the setup and the location of the sun - good for diffused reflected light for portraits outdoors, but not great at lighting a small area at a distance. Whereas a hundred dollar flash will put a lot of light exactly where you point it (and it follows the camera with no extra setup) regardless of how overcast the day is or the position of the sun.

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Feb 13, 2022 00:00:42   #
sourdough58 Loc: Maine
 
OK thanks, I will be trying it out.

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