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What is the difference between mirrorless cameras and bridge cameras?
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Jan 13, 2022 09:45:11   #
jonsailhob
 
Other than the lenses, is there a difference?

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Jan 13, 2022 09:48:27   #
CHG_CANON Loc: the Windy City
 
It depends on whether the bridge / smaller camera has a viewfinder. If you can put the Electronic View Finder (EVF) to your eye, for focus and / or image review, that can be a big deal in hard-to-see-light. There's a few odd-ball MILCs (Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera) that don't have the IBIS feature, in-body image stabilization. But, the viewfinder is the most obvious difference.

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Jan 13, 2022 09:58:34   #
jonsailhob
 
I’m using a Nikon Coolpix P510. Looks like slr. Has EVF and image stabilization. It is long in the tooth and am thinking about a Canon SX 70 to replace. It does all this older couple wants.

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Jan 13, 2022 10:42:48   #
MT Shooter Loc: Montana
 
jonsailhob wrote:
Other than the lenses, is there a difference?


All "bridge" cameras are mirrorless cameras. None offer TTL viewfinders which can only happen on SLR cameras. Bridge cameras have fixed lenses as you have alluded to. Bridge cameras also have sensors which are much smaller than "Crop" sensors or even M4/3s. These differences are also why they cost much less normally, although there are a few bridge cameras that cost quite a bit more than entry level DSLRs due to features, like VERY long reach equivalent mm lenses. ( Nikon P1000 is one notable example).

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Jan 13, 2022 10:48:12   #
whatdat Loc: Del Valle, Tx.
 
Started out with 2 Nikon p520’s. Actually took some really good pictures. Traded one in on a dslr & the other one just quit turning on, which was apparently was a common problem with 520’s. Kind of miss them as they were light, small, & covered a pretty good zoom range.

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Jan 13, 2022 10:50:19   #
wdross Loc: Castle Rock, Colorado
 
jonsailhob wrote:
Other than the lenses, is there a difference?


Sometimes there is no difference other than the sensor size and fixed zoom lens. Do not like bridge cameras for both those reasons. Even though I use a 4/3rds camera, the sensor size is much larger than the usual 1" sensor of a bridge camera. And I just changed out my system's lenses without having to buy new bodies. Sometimes, to keep the price down, manufacturers will take off features like a viewfinder and other items from bridge cameras.

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Jan 13, 2022 12:08:20   #
rmorrison1116 Loc: Southeast, Southcentral PA
 
jonsailhob wrote:
Other than the lenses, is there a difference?


While bridge cameras are mirrorless, as they have no mirror, the term "mirrorless camera" refers to MILC'S, Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera.

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Jan 13, 2022 12:17:25   #
BebuLamar
 
Mirrorless is for short but it doesn't mean any camera without a mirror is a mirrorless camera. If that is the case we had mirrorless camera for over 100 years.
In my opinion all mirrorless cameras have these features.
1. Digital not film.
2. Accept interchangeable lenses.
3. Have an electronic mean for viewing via images captured by the sensor. It doesn't have to be an eye level finder. Some mirrorless cameras only have an LCD panel for viewing but it's still a mirrorless camera.
4. Don't have mirror. A typical DSLR would qualify the above 3 but they have mirror so they are not mirrorless.

In another word a mirrorless camera is one that can perform the function of a DSLR but without the need for mirror.

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Jan 13, 2022 12:22:07   #
rmorrison1116 Loc: Southeast, Southcentral PA
 
MT Shooter wrote:
All "bridge" cameras are mirrorless cameras. None offer TTL viewfinders which can only happen on SLR cameras. Bridge cameras have fixed lenses as you have alluded to. Bridge cameras also have sensors which are much smaller than "Crop" sensors or even M4/3s. These differences are also why they cost much less normally, although there are a few bridge cameras that cost quite a bit more than entry level DSLRs due to features, like VERY long reach equivalent mm lenses. ( Nikon P1000 is one notable example).
All "bridge" cameras are mirrorless came... (show quote)


My pocket camera is a Canon G1X III Bridge camera, and it has an APS-C image sensor. My Canon "Mirrorless" camera has TTL viewfinder, as do most MILC'S. It's not an optical viewfinder like those in SLR'S. It's an Electronic View Finder, but it's still obtaining the image, Through The Lens.

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Jan 13, 2022 12:56:28   #
MT Shooter Loc: Montana
 
rmorrison1116 wrote:
My pocket camera is a Canon G1X III Bridge camera, and it has an APS-C image sensor. My Canon "Mirrorless" camera has TTL viewfinder, as do most MILC'S. It's not an optical viewfinder like those in SLR'S. It's an Electronic View Finder, but it's still obtaining the image, Through The Lens.


It's not TTL, it's EVF. Big difference between optical and electronic viewfinders.

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Jan 14, 2022 01:21:01   #
rmorrison1116 Loc: Southeast, Southcentral PA
 
MT Shooter wrote:
It's not TTL, it's EVF. Big difference between optical and electronic viewfinders.


Yes, I know. The terminologies and alphabet soup and shortened and or abbreviated designations being tossed around, have a remarkable habit of causing confusion. I thought I was clear in my response when I said that "mirrorless" viewfinders are Electronic View Finders, not Optical. As for TTL, yes, they are. Anyway, and I apologize for being so expansive but, the light enters the MILC Through The Lens and is projected onto the image sensor. The image going to the EVF is coming from the image sensor, which entered the camera, Through The Lens.
I dislike the term "mirrorless" and try not to use it. My G1X mk III has no mirror, making it mirrorless, but it's not a "mirrorless" camera. See my point?! Besides, "mirrorless" is 10 letters while "MILC", like "DSLR" is only 4. Bottom line; I'm a fan of EVF'S. I like the idea of seeing the actual processed image that will be stored if the shutter button is fully pressed.

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Jan 14, 2022 05:08:02   #
Gene51 Loc: Yonkers, NY, now in LSD (LowerSlowerDelaware)
 
MT Shooter wrote:
All "bridge" cameras are mirrorless cameras. None offer TTL viewfinders which can only happen on SLR cameras. Bridge cameras have fixed lenses as you have alluded to. Bridge cameras also have sensors which are much smaller than "Crop" sensors or even M4/3s. These differences are also why they cost much less normally, although there are a few bridge cameras that cost quite a bit more than entry level DSLRs due to features, like VERY long reach equivalent mm lenses. ( Nikon P1000 is one notable example).
All "bridge" cameras are mirrorless came... (show quote)


If you are looking at the back preview screen of a bridge camera, or maybe it's Electronic Viewfinder (EFV) - if it is not TTL, then what are you looking at? The only cameras that do not have TTL are rangefinder cameras. Otherwise, the image in the viewfinder or rear screen is TTL - Through The Lens since there is no other viewing system.

As far as bridge cameras having sensors that are smaller than Crop sensors, what about the Ricoh GR series - no EVF but non-interchangeable lens and 24mp APS-C sensor, Fuji X100T with its full frame sensor, fixed lens and hybrid Optical/EVF - and its little APS-C brothers the X70, XF10 and X100F, Canon G1XM3 - APS-C, G1M2 with it's slightly smaller 18.7mmx14mm sensor, Sony RX1R2 - fixed lens, full frame, Zeiss ZX1 - full frame, EVF, fixed lens, and Leica Q series - fixed lenses, full frame, EVF, Sigma DP2 Quattro - APS-C, fixed lens, EVF - are all examples of compact, fixed lens, EVF-TTL cameras that have larger sensors - from just below APS-C to full frame.

As far as cost is concerned, these range from $$550 for the Fuji XF10 to the Leicas and Zeiss which top out at $6000 and the most expensive ones have fixed, non-zoom lenses, or like the Canon G1 (APS-C), a very modest 24-72mm lens.


You must have missed these. . .

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Jan 14, 2022 05:41:23   #
Gene51 Loc: Yonkers, NY, now in LSD (LowerSlowerDelaware)
 
jonsailhob wrote:
Other than the lenses, is there a difference?


Bridge cameras, by design, are intended to "bridge" between point and shoot functionality, providing fixed lenses, full access to camera settings, compact size - and DSLR/Mirrorless which offer interchangeable lenses, and either M4/3, APS-C or Full frame sensors. The lenses are larger/heavier, and the cameras can be smaller and lighter than their DSLR equivalents.

Some bridge cameras can be modestly priced, but the better ones can be costly compared to what you get in terms of features. Most small sensor bridge cameras cannot compete with the larger sensor cameras when it comes to low light/high ISO situations.

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Jan 14, 2022 10:50:51   #
burkphoto Loc: High Point, NC
 
jonsailhob wrote:
Other than the lenses, is there a difference?


Today, “mirrorless” generally implies a camera has a system of interchangeable lenses and an electronic means of previewing the image for composition.

Technically, any camera without a reflex optical viewing system is mirrorless, but the common distinction is now that between MILC and dSLR systems.

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Jan 14, 2022 11:12:51   #
fdnave Loc: South Jersey
 
My bridge camera Sony RX 10 IV has an EVF and incredible phase detection focus. At my age the lenses for my Canon became too heavy to handle so after reviewing this camera I sold everything and will never look back. It has a fixed lens but it is a 24mm to 600mm and it weighs the same at each. Love it

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