Ugly Hedgehog - Photography Forum
Home Active Topics Newest Pictures Search Login Register
Photo Gallery
Do you see anything unusual?
Page 1 of 2 next>
Nov 24, 2021 11:42:48   #
genocolo Loc: Vail and Gasparilla Island
 
According to Audubon Florida, the Wood Stork is one of Florida’s signature wading birds, a long-legged, awkward-looking bird on land that soars like a raptor in the air.

Like many Florida birds associated with wetlands, the Wood Stork has suffered from the destruction and degradation of our state’s wetlands. Today, the Wood Stork is classed “Threatened” by the State of Florida and the federal government.

It feeds in shallow water, stirring the bottom with its unlikely pink feet and snapping up small prey that are unlucky enough to encounter the bird’s sensitive bill. They nest in early spring, just in time for the traditional season of lowest water when prey items will be concentrated in shrunken wetlands, providing good hunting so the storks can feed their young.

Now, we have altered the natural cycle of high and low water in our wetlands and Wood Storks often can’t find enough food for their young, who eventually succumb to starvation.

So, do you see anything unusual in the photo?


(Download)

Reply
Nov 24, 2021 11:48:09   #
UTMike Loc: South Jordan, UT
 
I like the shot, but I miss your point.

Reply
Nov 24, 2021 11:50:08   #
stanikon Loc: Waller TX
 
I'm with Mike.

Reply
 
 
Nov 24, 2021 12:00:24   #
Earnest Botello Loc: Hockley, Texas
 
Very good capture of a bird not wanting to stand tall.

Reply
Nov 24, 2021 12:01:59   #
NMGal Loc: NE NM
 
He looks alone.

Reply
Nov 24, 2021 12:14:34   #
Architect1776 Loc: In my mind
 
genocolo wrote:
According to Audubon Florida, the Wood Stork is one of Florida’s signature wading birds, a long-legged, awkward-looking bird on land that soars like a raptor in the air.

Like many Florida birds associated with wetlands, the Wood Stork has suffered from the destruction and degradation of our state’s wetlands. Today, the Wood Stork is classed “Threatened” by the State of Florida and the federal government.

It feeds in shallow water, stirring the bottom with its unlikely pink feet and snapping up small prey that are unlucky enough to encounter the bird’s sensitive bill. They nest in early spring, just in time for the traditional season of lowest water when prey items will be concentrated in shrunken wetlands, providing good hunting so the storks can feed their young.

Now, we have altered the natural cycle of high and low water in our wetlands and Wood Storks often can’t find enough food for their young, who eventually succumb to starvation.

So, do you see anything unusual in the photo?
According to Audubon Florida, the Wood Stork is on... (show quote)



Reply
Nov 24, 2021 12:16:33   #
Arizona Art
 
Never saw one “sitting down” legs folded forward. Neat capture.

Reply
 
 
Nov 24, 2021 12:16:45   #
Longshadow Loc: Audubon, PA, United States
 
Hahaha.
I've never seen that!
Looks funny, like he stuffed another bird into the ground.

Reply
Nov 24, 2021 19:37:49   #
wjones8637 Loc: Burleson, TX
 
is it the golf egg to the right?

Reply
Nov 25, 2021 07:14:33   #
tcthome Loc: Keansburg , NJ
 
The legs bent forward at the knees which make it look like it's knees are broken.

Reply
Nov 25, 2021 07:42:49   #
Delta49 Loc: Central Indiana
 
genocolo wrote:
According to Audubon Florida, the Wood Stork is one of Florida’s signature wading birds, a long-legged, awkward-looking bird on land that soars like a raptor in the air.

Like many Florida birds associated with wetlands, the Wood Stork has suffered from the destruction and degradation of our state’s wetlands. Today, the Wood Stork is classed “Threatened” by the State of Florida and the federal government.

It feeds in shallow water, stirring the bottom with its unlikely pink feet and snapping up small prey that are unlucky enough to encounter the bird’s sensitive bill. They nest in early spring, just in time for the traditional season of lowest water when prey items will be concentrated in shrunken wetlands, providing good hunting so the storks can feed their young.

Now, we have altered the natural cycle of high and low water in our wetlands and Wood Storks often can’t find enough food for their young, who eventually succumb to starvation.

So, do you see anything unusual in the photo?
According to Audubon Florida, the Wood Stork is on... (show quote)

Last year while in Florida I took a picture of one with a fishing lure stuck in his back. Thought you might have the same one but I don't think so. Could that be another bird under the left wing?

Reply
 
 
Nov 25, 2021 08:50:44   #
Bultaco Loc: Aiken, SC
 
Great shot, unique pose 1st time I've seen a bird on their knees.

Reply
Nov 25, 2021 09:58:53   #
RoswellAlien
 
Looks very uncomfortable.

Reply
Nov 25, 2021 10:34:25   #
James Van Ells
 
Love those big pink stork feet. Those mean breeding season is coming.

Reply
Nov 25, 2021 10:38:32   #
Zazzy1 Loc: Northern Ca.
 
That is funny. The feet look creepy.

Reply
Page 1 of 2 next>
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
Photo Gallery
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2021 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.