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going on a cruise
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Nov 20, 2021 02:27:14   #
2435marty
 
Going on a cruise end of February til mid March of '22. Considering that the photography is going to be of most everything ( people, places and things from near to far). Trying to pack light as possible, no tripod, what lenses should I consider taking (Nikon D7200). Available lenses, Nikon 16-85, 70-200, 50-300, 50mm and Tamron 16-300. I'm going to try to stay off Auto. I recently retired, got into photography to stay busy not quite three years ago, so I have a lot to learn and could use advise to make this bucket list trip memorable. Thanks everyone in advance.

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Nov 20, 2021 03:49:17   #
rmorrison1116 Loc: Southeast, Southcentral PA
 
If number of lenses is an issue, I'd bring the 50 and 16-300. Why are you going to try to stay of auto? My D7200 works quite well in semi-auto and full auto. Using manual all the time is not the badge of honor many UHH members like to say it is. I've been doing photography for a long time and digital photography since 2001. The cameras I shoot with today are pretty much usually set to Aperture Priority. I usually set the ISO, though occasionally use auto ISO, and the aperture and let the camera select shutter speed. I do use shutter priority when called for and sometimes, when light is plentiful and not an issue, even use full auto. Use what ever exposure mode best suited for the conditions and situation. Sometimes full auto is indeed the best choice. Again, shooting in full manual mode is not a badge of honor and you are far more likely, being relatively new to photography, to miss shots by doing so. Modern digital cameras are a whole lot more powerful and accurate than the older digital and analog cameras.

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Nov 20, 2021 06:20:33   #
KindaSpikey Loc: English living in San Diego
 
Although you say you are not taking a tripod, (to save space and weight I guess), you might want to consider taking a "gorilla pod", or one of the many similar devices. They are small and light, and can be very useful in many situations. You may really need a steady platform to get a better shot. You might want to set up your camera to include yourself in a group picture. You may need to "clamp" the camera in an unusual position (on a pole, or railing for example ). There are many different ways to use one of these and for the small size of it you might be glad to have it with you. Enjoy your trip, can't wait to see some of your photographs when you return.

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Nov 20, 2021 06:27:47   #
ELNikkor
 
Set the D7200 on "P", (NOT green "A"), and check the first exposure of your subject on the screen to be sure it is exposed the way you want. In most cases, the camera will be right-on, or only need a + or - exposure compensation. "Auto 1" white balance is a good standard for all lighting situations, but "Direct Sunlight" will give an accurate ambient light effect. That 16-300 would be the best 1-lens-for-the-trip solution. The 50 is so small and light, you might want to bring it too, but it will seldom be used.

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Nov 20, 2021 06:41:14   #
ELNikkor
 
You don't say where you are going, but if it is the Caribbean, the brightness of the sky and water can trick the auto-exposure modes into under-exposing, that is why you could either resort to "Manual" shooting or a +1 or +2 exposure compensation.

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Nov 20, 2021 06:41:36   #
camerapapi Loc: Miami, Fl.
 
I have been in several cruises and all I packed with me was my Olympus body with a 12-40 f2.8 Pro and the 40-150 kit lens.
The 12-40 f2.8 was my most used lens.

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Nov 20, 2021 07:20:22   #
ClarkJohnson Loc: Fort Myers, FL and Cohasset, MA
 
The single 16-300 should cover most of your shooting situation as you tour. For interiors (ship, buildings, etc.), you might consider investing in something wide and fast, such as the Tokina 11-20 f/2.8. Just noticed that it’s on sale at B&H for $399. For a bucket list trip, it might be worth it.

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Nov 20, 2021 07:31:14   #
knessr
 
Having been on 20+ cruises, your 16-300mm will cover you well in 99% of the shots. As for the tripod, leave it home. You won't have time to set it up and use it while on shore excursions and it is worthless while on a moving ship.

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Nov 20, 2021 08:05:16   #
Warhorse
 
While I have not been on as many cruises as knessr (7), I have to agree that your 16-300 would cover just about anything you would want to shoot.

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Nov 20, 2021 08:05:41   #
Kevin.M Loc: Forked River, NJ
 
2435marty wrote:
Going on a cruise end of February til mid March of '22. Considering that the photography is going to be of most everything ( people, places and things from near to far). Trying to pack light as possible, no tripod, what lenses should I consider taking (Nikon D7200). Available lenses, Nikon 16-85, 70-200, 50-300, 50mm and Tamron 16-300. I'm going to try to stay off Auto. I recently retired, got into photography to stay busy not quite three years ago, so I have a lot to learn and could use advise to make this bucket list trip memorable. Thanks everyone in advance.
Going on a cruise end of February til mid March of... (show quote)


As mentioned previously you don't say where you're cruising to. I recently went on a cruise and took my camera and 2 lenses. I would take your Nikon 16-85 and either one of your 300mm lenses or leave the 300mm home and rent a Nikon 200-500 for the trip. Definetly experiment, Aperture or Shutter priority with auto ISO, "P" mode or Auto should get you nice photo's.

Enjoy!

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Nov 20, 2021 09:51:13   #
Longshadow Loc: Audubon, PA, United States
 
I took my 50 and 18-200 to Iceland.
Didn't want to be carrying a bunch of stuff.

Why off Auto?.?
Because "someone said"?????
Auto is very good and comes in handy.
Some people avoid Auto like the plague, horseshit.
THEIR OPINION!
(Same with ONLY MANUAL - A self-imposed restriction!)
Auto has a place, just like A, S, and M do, depending on circumstances and desires.

If you believe you are still learning, the trip might not be the best place to experiment.
Practice and experiment with each mode so you learn what they do before you go.

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Nov 20, 2021 13:58:45   #
PHRubin Loc: Nashville TN USA
 
2435marty wrote:
Going on a cruise end of February til mid March of '22. Considering that the photography is going to be of most everything ( people, places and things from near to far). Trying to pack light as possible, no tripod, what lenses should I consider taking (Nikon D7200). Available lenses, Nikon 16-85, 70-200, 50-300, 50mm and Tamron 16-300. I'm going to try to stay off Auto. I recently retired, got into photography to stay busy not quite three years ago, so I have a lot to learn and could use advise to make this bucket list trip memorable. Thanks everyone in advance.
Going on a cruise end of February til mid March of... (show quote)

On my last cruise (a full ship country music themed one) I carried one DSLR with strobe and only my 18-300 zoom for on ship photos a well as a pocket camera for shore excursions. I also had spare batteries and chargers. I was happy with the results.

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Nov 21, 2021 06:39:58   #
Red6
 
2435marty wrote:
Going on a cruise end of February til mid March of '22. Considering that the photography is going to be of most everything ( people, places and things from near to far). Trying to pack light as possible, no tripod, what lenses should I consider taking (Nikon D7200). Available lenses, Nikon 16-85, 70-200, 50-300, 50mm and Tamron 16-300. I'm going to try to stay off Auto. I recently retired, got into photography to stay busy not quite three years ago, so I have a lot to learn and could use advise to make this bucket list trip memorable. Thanks everyone in advance.
Going on a cruise end of February til mid March of... (show quote)


Everyone will have an opinion from their experiences so here is mine. I have done numerous cruises. My wife and I love them. During the first couple, I took my Nikon D7000 and several lenses, including a wide to medium/long zoom, a prime, etc, and carried them everywhere. That was a mistake. During excursions at port destinations, you have to disembark the ship and climb aboard a bus or other transportation. These buses have limited space and seating and it is not always easy to get all your kit on and off easily. At stops for sightseeing, we have never really felt rushed but the time is limited. If you spend a lot of time setting up a tripod and taking one or two shots, you will miss much of what you came to see. The bus will have numerous stops to make before getting back to the ship at the required time. In short, if you want to see and experience all you have paid for, you cannot stop and spend a lot of time doing photography.

Besides, the opportunities to get really well composed, quality shots of a memorable site will be limited mainly because it IS a tourist area and will most likely be crowded and many people are usually present. Remember, depending on the cruise line and where it goes, there is an excellent chance there will be other cruise ships disembarking people at the same time you are there. We have been in ports where there were 2-3 other cruise ships docked. Many of the popular excursion sites may have multiple busses dropping off people.

During these first few cruises, while I did get a few good shots, most of our memorable shots came from my wife's iPhone as she would shoot as she walked and viewed all the sights while I fiddled with the camera gear. This led me to purchase a Sony RX100 M3. I left all the other gear at home and have been very pleased with the results. There are numerous makers of these small capable cameras including Canon, Nikon, etc, and are reasonably priced. They allow the photographer full control of exposure along with various auto modes and include a wide to moderate telephoto zoom. It is the only camera I carry on my travels now. It fits in a pocket or small shoulder bag and can be deployed in seconds to get the shots I would have missed otherwise.

However, to address your original question if I did want to carry the D7200, I would probably only bring the Nikon 16-85. This lens should cover the majority of your needs onboard the ship and most excursion shots. You may be tempted at taking the longer telephoto lens but these are heavy and with the ship moving I think would be of limited use. Besides, changing the lens is not something you may want to do on the deck of a ship. The Tamron 16-300 may also be a consideration depending on its weight.

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Nov 21, 2021 08:04:30   #
Dannj
 
Ask yourself: why am I taking this cruise? The answer will tell you what to take. Is this a photo shoot? If so, bring it all…remembering that you’re relatively new at photography and if you plan on shooting manual you’ll be spending a lot of time on lens changes and settings not to mention carrying it all wherever you go.
Is the trip a vacation and the primary purpose is relaxing and sightseeing? Bring the 16-300 and the flash, put the camera on auto and have fun. You can take some time for manual settings if you want but don’t get obsessed with it.
You also don’t mention if you’re traveling alone. That can make a difference depending on how much interest your traveling companion(s) share your interest in photography.

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Nov 21, 2021 08:24:15   #
Bayou
 
16-85. This lens is all I travel with anymore...and on my smallest, lightest body, a D3300. The 24 mp sensor allows for a lot of cropping, too (same as your D7200), so effectively a much longer lens.

Go light, and always be ready for the unexpected with a single lens/body combination that's light, quick to use, and always there. Travel by common carrier (as opposed to your own vehicle) is no time to lug around a bunch of stuff that will only slow you down and cause you to miss opportunities.

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