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Please Analyze the Attached Image for "noise" and make suggestions on additional ways to further reduce "noise."
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Oct 13, 2021 00:17:36   #
Shooter41 Loc: Wichita, KS
 
I have set a personal goal of trying to reduce as much digital noise in my images as possible, under whatever lighting conditions I am experiencing. In this instance I: (a) Intentionally shot when there was adequate light to exposure the image to the right of my histogram to achieve minimum noise possible. (b) I set my Sony RX10 on RAW to get the maximum number pixels for less noise on a partial frame camera. (c) I set the ISO on 125 to be in the sweet spot on the Sony RX10 for minimum noise. (d) I placed my camera close enough to the subject so that I could shoot at 220mm and not have to crop, because cropping would have caused more noise. (e) I raised the tripod holding the camera and shot downward, so that the background was light green to avoid more noticeable noise that occurs with a darker background. I would appreciate an analysis of the noise in the attached image and any suggestions from the excellent photographers on UHH that would further reduce any remaining noise in the attached image. (I did my best to put my post in the right category on UHH.)


(Download)

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Oct 13, 2021 00:35:41   #
B1strong Loc: Las Vegas, NV
 
Hey Don,

Did you ever try this denoise app- https://www.topazlabs.com/denoise-ai

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Oct 13, 2021 01:49:25   #
Grahame Loc: Fiji
 
Whilst I can't see any 'noise' of which I would be concerned about I do wonder how much detail you have lost from the original due to your processing?

Can you post the original so that we can see 'how much noise, if any' was there to start with?

I can not understand why anyone is going to have to worry about noise when an ISO of 125 has been used.

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Oct 13, 2021 01:58:51   #
Wallen Loc: Middle East
 
Shooter41 wrote:
I have set a personal goal of trying to reduce as much digital noise in my images as possible, under whatever lighting conditions I am experiencing. In this instance I: (a) Intentionally shot when there was adequate light to exposure the image to the right of my histogram to achieve minimum noise possible. (b) I set my Sony RX10 on RAW to get the maximum number pixels for less noise on a partial frame camera. (c) I set the ISO on 125 to be in the sweet spot on the Sony RX10 for minimum noise. (d) I placed my camera close enough to the subject so that I could shoot at 220mm and not have to crop, because cropping would have caused more noise. (e) I raised the tripod holding the camera and shot downward, so that the background was light green to avoid more noticeable noise that occurs with a darker background. I would appreciate an analysis of the noise in the attached image and any suggestions from the excellent photographers on UHH that would further reduce any remaining noise in the attached image. (I did my best to put my post in the right category on UHH.)
I have set a personal goal of trying to reduce as ... (show quote)


As there is no perfect camera and seldom a perfect shooting situation, every shot is always a balancing act. We can only do so much to get our preference, usually at the expense of other qualities.

In your image, the opposite contrast of the black & white feathers is problematic in any lighting condition. That two extremes will push a sensors dynamic range to its full capability. Shooting RAW will get you close but in reality, only an HDR/Bracketed shot will solve that extreme contrast which is almost impossible to accomplish on a wildlife photo.

It seems you have done your part in shooting to get the least noise but IMHO overdid the processing.
There is already a white halo projecting from the bird to the green background aside from totally washed out white areas in the feathers and much detail is lost.

My suggestion would be to improve the way you process the photo and to accept that there are situations where noise is unavoidable and can only be subdued but not eliminated.

Nevertheless, your practice of going for a specific goal will benefit your craft in the future. It will teach you the limits of your tools and broaden your understanding of digital photography.
Regardless of the initial outcome, that is a job well done.

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Oct 13, 2021 05:26:03   #
John N Loc: HP14 3QF Stokenchurch, UK
 
Grahame wrote:
Whilst I can't see any 'noise' of which I would be concerned about I do wonder how much detail you have lost from the original due to your processing?

Can you post the original so that we can see 'how much noise, if any' was there to start with?

I can not understand why anyone is going to have to worry about noise when an ISO of 125 has been used.


Can you 'introduce' noise as a result of PP?

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Oct 13, 2021 05:33:31   #
Grahame Loc: Fiji
 
John N wrote:
Can you 'introduce' noise as a result of PP?


I'm not sure if you can technically 'introduce' noise in PP but you can definitely severely increase any noise that is already there.

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Oct 13, 2021 07:23:59   #
photophile Loc: Lakewood, Ohio, USA
 
Shooter41 wrote:
I have set a personal goal of trying to reduce as much digital noise in my images as possible, under whatever lighting conditions I am experiencing. In this instance I: (a) Intentionally shot when there was adequate light to exposure the image to the right of my histogram to achieve minimum noise possible. (b) I set my Sony RX10 on RAW to get the maximum number pixels for less noise on a partial frame camera. (c) I set the ISO on 125 to be in the sweet spot on the Sony RX10 for minimum noise. (d) I placed my camera close enough to the subject so that I could shoot at 220mm and not have to crop, because cropping would have caused more noise. (e) I raised the tripod holding the camera and shot downward, so that the background was light green to avoid more noticeable noise that occurs with a darker background. I would appreciate an analysis of the noise in the attached image and any suggestions from the excellent photographers on UHH that would further reduce any remaining noise in the attached image. (I did my best to put my post in the right category on UHH.)
I have set a personal goal of trying to reduce as ... (show quote)



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Oct 13, 2021 09:11:17   #
Wallen Loc: Middle East
 
John N wrote:
Can you 'introduce' noise as a result of PP?


Usually just enhance what is already there.
In Photoshop yes, there is a dedicated dropdown menu to introduce noise (artistically).

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Oct 13, 2021 09:29:10   #
David Martin Loc: Cary, NC
 
It seems to be a well composed photo with minimal noise.

As others have suggested, in order to provide meaningful advice, it would be helpful to see the original for comparison, to see if there was more detail in the feathers and whether or not the halo effect along the right side of the bird was present in the original vs. a result of post-processing.

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Oct 13, 2021 10:15:53   #
R.G. Loc: Scotland
 
John N wrote:
Can you 'introduce' noise as a result of PP?


Noise which was not visible SOOC can be made visible with PP. Lifting the shadows or overall brightening, adding contrast and/or clarity and adding sharpening can all aggravate what was already there. And making extreme adjustments with the HSL tool can add colour noise that can be very difficult to get rid of. Keeping sharpening away from the noise and keeping denoise away from edges and small detail are the best tactics. There are various ways to do that - making selections is one way, using the sharpening/denoise tool's masking is another.

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Oct 14, 2021 09:16:52   #
Jimmy T Loc: Virginia
 
Shooter41 wrote:
I have set a personal goal of trying to reduce as much digital noise in my images as possible, under whatever lighting conditions I am experiencing. In this instance I: (a) Intentionally shot when there was adequate light to exposure the image to the right of my histogram to achieve minimum noise possible. (b) I set my Sony RX10 on RAW to get the maximum number pixels for less noise on a partial frame camera. (c) I set the ISO on 125 to be in the sweet spot on the Sony RX10 for minimum noise. (d) I placed my camera close enough to the subject so that I could shoot at 220mm and not have to crop, because cropping would have caused more noise. (e) I raised the tripod holding the camera and shot downward, so that the background was light green to avoid more noticeable noise that occurs with a darker background. I would appreciate an analysis of the noise in the attached image and any suggestions from the excellent photographers on UHH that would further reduce any remaining noise in the attached image. (I did my best to put my post in the right category on UHH.)
I have set a personal goal of trying to reduce as ... (show quote)


Try Topaz Denoise - One Pass in full auto . . .


(Download)

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Oct 14, 2021 15:56:43   #
joecichjr Loc: Chicago S. Suburbs, Illinois, USA
 
Jimmy T wrote:
Try Topaz Denoise - One Pass in full auto . . .


Lovely 🖤🖤🖤🖤

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Oct 14, 2021 20:47:24   #
Alphabravo2020
 
Don't denoise techniques generally result in a reduced resolution? I was reading about a denoise technique and as I understood it, it basically increases contrast at adjacent pixels at the expense of resolution.

Edit: actually, nevermind this. I think I am confusing sharpening with denoise. Still I think there must be some tradeoff since denoise algorithms must result in the loss of some good pixels.

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Oct 14, 2021 21:34:46   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
First off, I wouldn't worry about "noise", an unfortunate name selected from the EE field. It's digital grain and a natural occurrence with any photograph. If I were you, I'd worry more about the blown-out white areas of the subject. That would be more of a concern to me.
--Bob
Shooter41 wrote:
I have set a personal goal of trying to reduce as much digital noise in my images as possible, under whatever lighting conditions I am experiencing. In this instance I: (a) Intentionally shot when there was adequate light to exposure the image to the right of my histogram to achieve minimum noise possible. (b) I set my Sony RX10 on RAW to get the maximum number pixels for less noise on a partial frame camera. (c) I set the ISO on 125 to be in the sweet spot on the Sony RX10 for minimum noise. (d) I placed my camera close enough to the subject so that I could shoot at 220mm and not have to crop, because cropping would have caused more noise. (e) I raised the tripod holding the camera and shot downward, so that the background was light green to avoid more noticeable noise that occurs with a darker background. I would appreciate an analysis of the noise in the attached image and any suggestions from the excellent photographers on UHH that would further reduce any remaining noise in the attached image. (I did my best to put my post in the right category on UHH.)
I have set a personal goal of trying to reduce as ... (show quote)

Reply
Oct 22, 2021 01:53:25   #
coj Loc: NJ, USA
 
Grahame wrote:
Whilst I can't see any 'noise' of which I would be concerned about I do wonder how much detail you have lost from the original due to your processing?

Can you post the original so that we can see 'how much noise, if any' was there to start with?

I can not understand why anyone is going to have to worry about noise when an ISO of 125 has been used.


Easy....If the subject is too dark (in RAW, NEF) and they add light it will add noise that way. Or if you start cropping a lot it can add noise. Over sharpening can also do it. But generally speaking, as you said, ISO 125 should never produce noise. In any case Topaz AI Denoise can work wonders. I use it a lot, and I have re-edited old photos that were shot at ISO 6500 and the like, cleaned it right up!! Well worth the money.

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