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Camera Settings/Gear for Egypt
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Oct 11, 2021 14:51:20   #
wannabe63 Loc: Bellevue, Washington
 
The reason for writing this is that I'm going on a tour to Egypt and Jordan and want to get the most out of it, photography wise. In looking on line I noticed that a lot of photos taken of pyramids, tombs and desert etc., seemed flat and washed out. I could see that they were taken mid-day which resulted in the flat lighting. I'm sure that shooting in the early morning or later in the day would produce better images. But being that it's a tour in Egypt, I will not have the flexibility to venture out on my own and will be stuck with the group and have to deal with, at times, mid-day photo ops, when lighting is at its worst. I feel like I will be stuck with that scenario and am looking for suggestions addressing in camera settings, filters or anything else you can think of that would improve those mid-day images.

The camera gear that I will be taking is a Nikon D750, a 28-300mm, F1:3.5-5.6 and 16-35mm f1:4. As wishful thinking goes, I also hope to get some night shots of the milky way so I'll have a Rokinon 14mm f1:2.8 and assorted necessary gear.

Looking forward to what you suggest and thank you for taking the time to respond.

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Oct 11, 2021 15:14:56   #
Delderby Loc: Derby UK
 
Hi Wannabe63 - IMHO as a non-expert. A ten x zoom will not help with flat pics. Whistle-stop tours are not planned with serious photographers in mind. Your tour guide may have some more positive suggestions - I guess he will!
You might find better shadow than you think. At least you know what you are after - many photographers? have no idea. Good luck - have a great time.

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Oct 11, 2021 16:05:01   #
wannabe63 Loc: Bellevue, Washington
 
Delderby wrote:
Hi Wannabe63 - IMHO as a non-expert. A ten x zoom will not help with flat pics. Whistle-stop tours are not planned with serious photographers in mind. Your tour guide may have some more positive suggestions - I guess he will!
You might find better shadow than you think. At least you know what you are after - many photographers? have no idea. Good luck - have a great time.


Thanks for the response. I'm excited as this has been on my bucket list for a long time. I would like to return with at least one print worthy image.

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Oct 11, 2021 17:44:04   #
rgrenaderphoto Loc: Hollywood, CA
 
wannabe63 wrote:
The reason for writing this is that I'm going on a tour to Egypt and Jordan and want to get the most out of it, photography wise. In looking on line I noticed that a lot of photos taken of pyramids, tombs and desert etc., seemed flat and washed out. I could see that they were taken mid-day which resulted in the flat lighting. I'm sure that shooting in the early morning or later in the day would produce better images. But being that it's a tour in Egypt, I will not have the flexibility to venture out on my own and will be stuck with the group and have to deal with, at times, mid-day photo ops, when lighting is at its worst. I feel like I will be stuck with that scenario and am looking for suggestions addressing in camera settings, filters or anything else you can think of that would improve those mid-day images.

The camera gear that I will be taking is a Nikon D750, a 28-300mm, F1:3.5-5.6 and 16-35mm f1:4. As wishful thinking goes, I also hope to get some night shots of the milky way so I'll have a Rokinon 14mm f1:2.8 and assorted necessary gear.

Looking forward to what you suggest and thank you for taking the time to respond.
The reason for writing this is that I'm going on a... (show quote)


After traveling with a Nikon DLSR and almost the same kit, I have to say that the 28-300 is really the only lens you need, which simplifies the weight of what you are going to be carrying.

I have also been with groups where street thieves have sliced camera straps, cut backpacks open, etc When overseas, I always carry a Pacsafe camera backpack and strap.

https://pacsafe.com/collections/camera-backpacks

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Oct 11, 2021 19:56:17   #
wannabe63 Loc: Bellevue, Washington
 
rgrenaderphoto wrote:
After traveling with a Nikon DLSR and almost the same kit, I have to say that the 28-300 is really the only lens you need, which simplifies the weight of what you are going to be carrying.

I have also been with groups where street thieves have sliced camera straps, cut backpacks open, etc When overseas, I always carry a Pacsafe camera backpack and strap.

https://pacsafe.com/collections/camera-backpacks


Good suggestion. Thank you.

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Oct 12, 2021 08:42:56   #
Canisdirus
 
Gear seems fine.
Perhaps take a circular polarizer and a neutral density for the strong parts of the day.

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Oct 12, 2021 08:48:16   #
wireloose
 
In my limited experience non-photo tours rarely are off at sunrise. A car and driver in Egypt is not expensive, the hotel or guide can recommend them, especially if you know where you want to go. They can bring you back to the hotel or meet with your group once they are on the move. I would consider a fast 35mm or 50mm prime or similar for the soukh, and indoors.

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Oct 12, 2021 09:01:34   #
roxiemarty Loc: Florida
 
I recommend a filter to protect your lens from sand. My friend went to Egypt and that filter saved her lens from sand blown scratches! I would not plan on changing lenses out there due to the sand. But maybe others that were there have more ideas.

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Oct 12, 2021 11:00:56   #
sueyeisert Loc: New Jersey
 
Bring cleaning material for your lenses and camera. Maybe practice cleaning a sensor.

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Oct 12, 2021 12:21:38   #
ZtaKED Loc: Lakes Region, New Hampshire & NE Florida
 
wannabe63 wrote:
The reason for writing this is that I'm going on a tour to Egypt and Jordan and want to get the most out of it, photography wise. In looking on line I noticed that a lot of photos taken of pyramids, tombs and desert etc., seemed flat and washed out. I could see that they were taken mid-day which resulted in the flat lighting. I'm sure that shooting in the early morning or later in the day would produce better images. But being that it's a tour in Egypt, I will not have the flexibility to venture out on my own and will be stuck with the group and have to deal with, at times, mid-day photo ops, when lighting is at its worst. I feel like I will be stuck with that scenario and am looking for suggestions addressing in camera settings, filters or anything else you can think of that would improve those mid-day images.

The camera gear that I will be taking is a Nikon D750, a 28-300mm, F1:3.5-5.6 and 16-35mm f1:4. As wishful thinking goes, I also hope to get some night shots of the milky way so I'll have a Rokinon 14mm f1:2.8 and assorted necessary gear.

Looking forward to what you suggest and thank you for taking the time to respond.
The reason for writing this is that I'm going on a... (show quote)


I have worked in Egypt. Be prepared as Egypt is in reality brown, dusty and washed out in the best of times. The hard part is the dust in the air that creates a perpetual haze. You might try EV to the minus side for landscape and see if that helps. Always check on the use of flash before shooting inside a museum or historical site. Light pollution at night is just as bad there in the big cities as it is elsewhere. Street shooting should be fairly easy but I caution you to not engage with street vendors or beggars as something as simple as eye contact will give them the idea you are a willing buyer. Never accept an item to just look at it unless you are ready to buy it.

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Oct 12, 2021 14:02:15   #
Robg
 
wannabe63 wrote:
The reason for writing this is that I'm going on a tour to Egypt and Jordan and want to get the most out of it, photography wise. ...
Looking forward to what you suggest and thank you for taking the time to respond.

I was in Egypt 2.5 years ago and a sudden but small sandstorm in Giza wiped out my zoom. So, be prepared with a protective bag.

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Oct 12, 2021 14:28:29   #
Kozan Loc: Trenton Tennessee
 
Do an HDR image. Now, I have a D850 which does in-camera HDR combining two images into one automatically.
The results is not the greatest. But I have been successful shooting about 5 frames at high speed with different exposures on each frame (set your camera for Continuous High-Speed). Use -2EV, -1EV, 0EV, +1EV, and +2EV. Shoot. Then combining in Photoshop (or any good editing program) you can get a nice HDR picture that has good cloud exposure and the general non-cloud exposure. Takes about 1/2" to take 5 frames.

Once you practice the technique, it becomes easy to do.

Good luck on your adventures!

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Oct 12, 2021 15:17:37   #
wannabe63 Loc: Bellevue, Washington
 
Canisdirus wrote:
Gear seems fine.
Perhaps take a circular polarizer and a neutral density for the strong parts of the day.


Thanks for your suggestion. I was planning on bringing a CP. I can easily throw in a ND.

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Oct 12, 2021 15:24:55   #
wannabe63 Loc: Bellevue, Washington
 
wireloose wrote:
In my limited experience non-photo tours rarely are off at sunrise. A car and driver in Egypt is not expensive, the hotel or guide can recommend them, especially if you know where you want to go. They can bring you back to the hotel or meet with your group once they are on the move. I would consider a fast 35mm or 50mm prime or similar for the soukh, and indoors.


I've taken non-photography tours before and they move right along. They don't allow any time for a serious photographer to look for and compose a decent. I will try to make arrangements to have someone take me around. I do have a 50mm f1:1.4 available. Thanks for responding.

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Oct 12, 2021 15:28:12   #
wannabe63 Loc: Bellevue, Washington
 
roxiemarty wrote:
I recommend a filter to protect your lens from sand. My friend went to Egypt and that filter saved her lens from sand blown scratches! I would not plan on changing lenses out there due to the sand. But maybe others that were there have more ideas.


I will take 2 camera bodies in hopes of avoiding changing lenses. If necessary and practical I plan on changing on he bus. Thanks for responding.

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