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Oct 11, 2021 12:14:35   #
psievers
 
How would I crate the ribbon effect shooting a waterfall with my RX10 IV/

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Oct 11, 2021 12:19:50   #
twowindsbear
 
What is "the ribbon effect?"

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Oct 11, 2021 12:23:32   #
robertjerl Loc: Corona, California
 
psievers wrote:
How would I crate the ribbon effect shooting a waterfall with my RX10 IV/


No matter the camera if you want the smooth continuous look to a waterfall you use a very slow shutter speed.
Read this: https://www.google.com/search?q=shutter+speed+to+make+a+waterfall+smooth&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS937US937&oq=shutter+speed+to+make+a+waterfall+smooth&aqs=chrome..69i57j33i160.14302j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

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Oct 11, 2021 12:25:28   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
I'm guessing here. A slow shutter speed.
--Bob
psievers wrote:
How would I crate the ribbon effect shooting a waterfall with my RX10 IV/

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Oct 11, 2021 13:05:57   #
wdross Loc: Castle Rock, Colorado
 
psievers wrote:
How would I crate the ribbon effect shooting a waterfall with my RX10 IV/


Tripod, slow shutter speed, and possibly neutral density filters.

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Oct 11, 2021 13:30:04   #
ricardo00
 
wdross wrote:
Tripod, slow shutter speed, and possibly neutral density filters.


Yep but with a little explanation: depending on how much light there is, slowing the shutter speed might result in overexposure. So you use the smallest aperture your camera allows (remember aperture is a reciprocal, so f/32 or smaller, etc) and slow shutter speed. If overexposed, you will need to add neutral density filters to further decrease the light. Or go early morning or evening when light is low.

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Oct 11, 2021 13:49:35   #
wdross Loc: Castle Rock, Colorado
 
ricardo00 wrote:
Yep but with a little explanation: depending on how much light there is, slowing the shutter speed might result in overexposure. So you use the smallest aperture your camera allows (remember aperture is a reciprocal, so f/32 or smaller, etc) and slow shutter speed. If overexposed, you will need to add neutral density filters to further decrease the light. Or go early morning or evening when light is low.


It was a little too "short and sweet"? Sorry about that!

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Oct 11, 2021 14:02:15   #
bwana Loc: Bergen, Alberta, Canada
 
psievers wrote:
How would I crate the ribbon effect shooting a waterfall with my RX10 IV/

You can accomplish that is a couple of ways.

1) My preference is to shoot 25-50 images handheld and stack them in something like Affinity Photo. Adjust aperture to force a fairly slow shutter speed, i.e.: 1/50-1/60 sec.

2) Lug a tripod and neutral density filters to the site and shoot a long exposure.

Have fun!

bwa


(Download)

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Oct 11, 2021 15:20:01   #
Gene51 Loc: Yonkers, NY, now in LSD (LowerSlowerDelaware)
 
psievers wrote:
How would I crate the ribbon effect shooting a waterfall with my RX10 IV/


With a 1" sensor, it is not likely you would want to use a tiny aperture, due to severe loss of sharpness from diffraction. So, a neutral density filter would be a better approach. Lowest ISO and longer shutter speeds will get you there. If you are close to the waterfall, a slower shutter speed will get you want you want. The distance to the waterfall as well as the volume of water will determine your shutter speed. More water flow and greater distances will let you use faster shutter speeds. Your range might be from 4 secs to 1/500 sec.

These are not done with the RX10 but will give you a sense of what might work for you.

1 sec exposure
1 sec exposure...
(Download)

1.3 sec exposure
1.3 sec exposure...
(Download)

1/250 sec exposure
1/250 sec exposure...
(Download)

2 sec exposure
2 sec exposure...
(Download)

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Oct 11, 2021 17:33:04   #
joecichjr Loc: Chicago S. Suburbs, Illinois, USA
 
Gene51 wrote:
With a 1" sensor, it is not likely you would want to use a tiny aperture, due to severe loss of sharpness from diffraction. So, a neutral density filter would be a better approach. Lowest ISO and longer shutter speeds will get you there. If you are close to the waterfall, a slower shutter speed will get you want you want. The distance to the waterfall as well as the volume of water will determine your shutter speed. More water flow and greater distances will let you use faster shutter speeds. Your range might be from 4 secs to 1/500 sec.

These are not done with the RX10 but will give you a sense of what might work for you.
With a 1" sensor, it is not likely you would ... (show quote)


Gorgeous falls captures 💎💞💎💞💎

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Oct 11, 2021 18:06:47   #
joecichjr Loc: Chicago S. Suburbs, Illinois, USA
 
bwana wrote:
You can accomplish that is a couple of ways.

1) My preference is to shoot 25-50 images handheld and stack them in something like Affinity Photo. Adjust aperture to force a fairly slow shutter speed, i.e.: 1/50-1/60 sec.

2) Lug a tripod and neutral density filters to the site and shoot a long exposure.

Have fun!

bwa


Wow 🌀🌊🌀🌊🌀

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Oct 11, 2021 20:46:40   #
MDI Mainer Loc: Mount Desert, Maine
 
wdross wrote:
Tripod, slow shutter speed, and possibly neutral density filters.



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Oct 11, 2021 22:38:05   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
I'll post one, as well.
1 second, f/45, 85B filter
--Bob
psievers wrote:
How would I crate the ribbon effect shooting a waterfall with my RX10 IV/


(Download)

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Oct 12, 2021 02:29:16   #
wdross Loc: Castle Rock, Colorado
 
Gene51 wrote:
With a 1" sensor, it is not likely you would want to use a tiny aperture, due to severe loss of sharpness from diffraction. So, a neutral density filter would be a better approach. Lowest ISO and longer shutter speeds will get you there. If you are close to the waterfall, a slower shutter speed will get you want you want. The distance to the waterfall as well as the volume of water will determine your shutter speed. More water flow and greater distances will let you use faster shutter speeds. Your range might be from 4 secs to 1/500 sec.

These are not done with the RX10 but will give you a sense of what might work for you.
With a 1" sensor, it is not likely you would ... (show quote)


Gene, I know that diffraction starts to raise its ugly head around f8 for 4/3rds sensors. At approximately what f-stop does diffraction start for your 1" sensor in your Sony RX10 mkIV? Does it tend to start that much earlier in the 1/2.3" sensors?

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Oct 12, 2021 03:06:32   #
Gene51 Loc: Yonkers, NY, now in LSD (LowerSlowerDelaware)
 
joecichjr wrote:
Gorgeous falls captures 💎💞💎💞💎


Thanks!

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