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Switzerland: Lucerne Part 4 - Scenes Along The River Reuss
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Sep 24, 2021 14:42:40   #
srfmhg Loc: Marin County, CA
 
My last post of The Kapellbrücke (literally, Chapel Bridge) would not be complete if I didn't post images of some of the magnificent views of the Reuss Rivew taken from the bridge and along the banks.

The Reuss (Swiss German: Rüüss) is a river in Switzerland. With a length of 164 kilometres (102 mi) and a drainage basin of 3,426 square kilometres (1,323 sq mi), it is the fourth largest river in Switzerland (after the Rhine, Aare and Rhône). The upper Reuss forms the main valley of the canton of Uri. The course of the lower Reuss runs from Lake Lucerne to the confluence with the Aare at Brugg and Windisch.

The Reuss is one of the four major rivers taking their source in the Gotthard region, along with the Rhine, Ticino and Rhône.

The Gotthardreuss rises in the Gotthard massif, emerging from Lago di Lucendro (reservoir built in 1947; elevation 2,134 m) in the canton of Ticino and passing into the canton of Uri at Brüggboden (1,910 m).

The Furkareuss rises east of Furka Pass from Schwärziseeli and forms the valley called Urseren, passing Realp at 1,540 m. This source is only around 5km away from, and on the same mountain massif as the source of the Rhône, but will ultimately lead to the opposite side of the continent.

Gotthardreuss and Furkareuss join at Hospental (1,452 m). Downstream of Andermatt (1,432 m) the Reuss passes through Schöllenen Gorge and under the legendary Devil's Bridge. At Göschenen (1,102 m) it is joined by the Göschenerreuss. From here it forms the main valley of the canton of Uri, passing below Wassen (840 m), Gurtnellen (711 m), Silenen (500 m), and through Erstfeld (471 m), past Attinghausen and Altdorf (452 m), joining the southernmost part of Lake Lucerne (the Urnersee) between Flüelen and Seedorf (434 m).

The Reuss leaves Lake Lucerne some 20 km to the north-west, at the city of Lucerne. Notable bridges in Lucerne are the Kapellbrücke, first built 1333, rebuilt 1993 and Spreuerbrücke, built 1408. A needle dam just upstream from the Spreuerbrücke) maintains the water level. It receives the Kleine Emme from Entlebuch at Emmen (432 m). From here, it flows north-east through Buchrain, Root, Gisikon and Honau, and downstream of Honau (402 m) leaves the canton of Lucerne, now forming the border between Aargau and Zug, passing Dietwil (Aargau), Risch-Rotkreuz (Zug), Oberrüti (Aargau) and Sins (Aargau), Hünenberg (Zug) and Mühlau (Aargau). It receives the Lorze from Lake Zug downstream of Maschwanden.

Downstream of this confluence, the Reuss forms the border between Aargau and Zürich, passing Merenschwand (Aargau, 389 m) and Ottenbach (Zurich, 384 m), and enters Aargau downstream of Ottenbach.

The lower Reuss flows along a series of former glacial lakes. Settlements along the river were built on lateral moraines, while the river bed itself was marshy and subject to flooding, and thus unsuitable for settlement. The oldest river crossings are along terminal moraines between the former glacial lakes.

The Reuss valley was under Habsburg Austrian rule during the 14th century.

In the 15th century, the Reuss became the border between territories of the Swiss Confederacy, in 1429 between Lucerne and Zürich, and later between Zug, Zürich and the Freie Ämter condominium, between Freie Ämter and Baden, and between Baden and Berne. The Reuss downstream of Ottenbach came to lie within Aargau with the creation of this canton in 1803.

The Reuss had the status of "imperial road" (freie Reichsstrasse) in the late medieval period. Until 1798, it was the responsibility of cantonal authorities (the Reussherren of Lucerne and Zug) to keep the river navigable. The river was important as waterway for traffic between Lucerne and Zurzach, and via Aare and Rhine to Basel, until the construction of transit roads in the 18th century. River crossings by ferry in the medieval period were at Lunkhofen (mentioned 1160), Windisch, Sins, Mühlau, Oberrüti, and Dietwil. The crossing at Lunkhofen was on the main route from Zürich to Berne. Bridges across the Reuss were in Lucerne, Bremgarten (1230), Mellingen (mentioned 1253) and Gisikon (1432). In 1528, the Catholic cantons blocked the trade routes across the Reuss for Protestant cantons and trade between Zürich and Berne was re-routed through Windisch.

Because ferries and bridges were a source of income, the construction of new crossings was opposed during the early modern period, and only one new bridge was built, commissioned by Zug, at Sins (1640). New bridges were built only after the collapse of the Old Swiss Confederacy, e.g. at Windisch (1799), Ottenbach (1864) and Mühlau (1940).

By the end of the 20th century, there were more than a dozen crossings of the lower Reuss, including a number of railway and motorway bridges.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reuss_%28river%29

I hope you enjoy these images. For additional images of the Chapel Bridge, Lake Lucerne and Lucerne street scenes, please see my previous posts:
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-712513-1.html
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-712232-1.html
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-711865-1.html
Mark

Taken from The Kapellbrücke
Taken from The Kapellbrücke...
(Download)


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Needle dam regulating Lake Lucerne at Lucerne on the River Reuss
Needle dam regulating Lake Lucerne at Lucerne on t...
(Download)

A needle dam is a weir designed to maintain the level or flow of a river through the use of thin "needles" of wood. Individual needles can be added or removed by hand to constrict the flow of the river, forming a sluice.
A needle dam is a weir designed to maintain the le...
(Download)

Reply
Sep 24, 2021 14:54:31   #
Susan yamakawa
 
Lovely pictUres👍😊

Reply
Sep 24, 2021 15:02:11   #
kpmac Loc: Ragley, La
 
Another excellent set of images and thanks for the narrative, too.

Reply
 
 
Sep 24, 2021 15:02:18   #
DJphoto Loc: SF Bay Area
 
srfmhg wrote:
My last post of The Kapellbrücke (literally, Chapel Bridge) would not be complete if I didn't post images of some of the magnificent views of the Reuss Rivew taken from the bridge and along the banks.

The Reuss (Swiss German: Rüüss) is a river in Switzerland. With a length of 164 kilometres (102 mi) and a drainage basin of 3,426 square kilometres (1,323 sq mi), it is the fourth largest river in Switzerland (after the Rhine, Aare and Rhône). The upper Reuss forms the main valley of the canton of Uri. The course of the lower Reuss runs from Lake Lucerne to the confluence with the Aare at Brugg and Windisch.

The Reuss is one of the four major rivers taking their source in the Gotthard region, along with the Rhine, Ticino and Rhône.

The Gotthardreuss rises in the Gotthard massif, emerging from Lago di Lucendro (reservoir built in 1947; elevation 2,134 m) in the canton of Ticino and passing into the canton of Uri at Brüggboden (1,910 m).

The Furkareuss rises east of Furka Pass from Schwärziseeli and forms the valley called Urseren, passing Realp at 1,540 m. This source is only around 5km away from, and on the same mountain massif as the source of the Rhône, but will ultimately lead to the opposite side of the continent.

Gotthardreuss and Furkareuss join at Hospental (1,452 m). Downstream of Andermatt (1,432 m) the Reuss passes through Schöllenen Gorge and under the legendary Devil's Bridge. At Göschenen (1,102 m) it is joined by the Göschenerreuss. From here it forms the main valley of the canton of Uri, passing below Wassen (840 m), Gurtnellen (711 m), Silenen (500 m), and through Erstfeld (471 m), past Attinghausen and Altdorf (452 m), joining the southernmost part of Lake Lucerne (the Urnersee) between Flüelen and Seedorf (434 m).

The Reuss leaves Lake Lucerne some 20 km to the north-west, at the city of Lucerne. Notable bridges in Lucerne are the Kapellbrücke, first built 1333, rebuilt 1993 and Spreuerbrücke, built 1408. A needle dam just upstream from the Spreuerbrücke) maintains the water level. It receives the Kleine Emme from Entlebuch at Emmen (432 m). From here, it flows north-east through Buchrain, Root, Gisikon and Honau, and downstream of Honau (402 m) leaves the canton of Lucerne, now forming the border between Aargau and Zug, passing Dietwil (Aargau), Risch-Rotkreuz (Zug), Oberrüti (Aargau) and Sins (Aargau), Hünenberg (Zug) and Mühlau (Aargau). It receives the Lorze from Lake Zug downstream of Maschwanden.

Downstream of this confluence, the Reuss forms the border between Aargau and Zürich, passing Merenschwand (Aargau, 389 m) and Ottenbach (Zurich, 384 m), and enters Aargau downstream of Ottenbach.

The lower Reuss flows along a series of former glacial lakes. Settlements along the river were built on lateral moraines, while the river bed itself was marshy and subject to flooding, and thus unsuitable for settlement. The oldest river crossings are along terminal moraines between the former glacial lakes.

The Reuss valley was under Habsburg Austrian rule during the 14th century.

In the 15th century, the Reuss became the border between territories of the Swiss Confederacy, in 1429 between Lucerne and Zürich, and later between Zug, Zürich and the Freie Ämter condominium, between Freie Ämter and Baden, and between Baden and Berne. The Reuss downstream of Ottenbach came to lie within Aargau with the creation of this canton in 1803.

The Reuss had the status of "imperial road" (freie Reichsstrasse) in the late medieval period. Until 1798, it was the responsibility of cantonal authorities (the Reussherren of Lucerne and Zug) to keep the river navigable. The river was important as waterway for traffic between Lucerne and Zurzach, and via Aare and Rhine to Basel, until the construction of transit roads in the 18th century. River crossings by ferry in the medieval period were at Lunkhofen (mentioned 1160), Windisch, Sins, Mühlau, Oberrüti, and Dietwil. The crossing at Lunkhofen was on the main route from Zürich to Berne. Bridges across the Reuss were in Lucerne, Bremgarten (1230), Mellingen (mentioned 1253) and Gisikon (1432). In 1528, the Catholic cantons blocked the trade routes across the Reuss for Protestant cantons and trade between Zürich and Berne was re-routed through Windisch.

Because ferries and bridges were a source of income, the construction of new crossings was opposed during the early modern period, and only one new bridge was built, commissioned by Zug, at Sins (1640). New bridges were built only after the collapse of the Old Swiss Confederacy, e.g. at Windisch (1799), Ottenbach (1864) and Mühlau (1940).

By the end of the 20th century, there were more than a dozen crossings of the lower Reuss, including a number of railway and motorway bridges.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reuss_%28river%29

I hope you enjoy these images. For additional images of the Chapel Bridge, Lake Lucerne and Lucerne street scenes, please see my previous posts:
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-712513-1.html
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-712232-1.html
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-711865-1.html
Mark
My last post of The Kapellbrücke (literally, Chape... (show quote)


Superb set Mark. The needle dam is very interesting; something I had never heard of.

Reply
Sep 24, 2021 15:13:13   #
Longshadow Loc: Audubon, PA, United States
 

Reply
Sep 24, 2021 15:38:17   #
srfmhg Loc: Marin County, CA
 
Susan yamakawa wrote:
Lovely pictUres👍😊


Thanks Susan.

Reply
Sep 24, 2021 15:39:06   #
srfmhg Loc: Marin County, CA
 
kpmac wrote:
Another excellent set of images and thanks for the narrative, too.


Thank you very much Ken, especially for taking the time to read the narrative.

Reply
 
 
Sep 24, 2021 15:40:33   #
srfmhg Loc: Marin County, CA
 
DJphoto wrote:
Superb set Mark. The needle dam is very interesting; something I had never heard of.


Thanks very much Dennis. I was unaware of it as well despite seeing it and I learned about it researching this post!

Reply
Sep 24, 2021 15:40:56   #
srfmhg Loc: Marin County, CA
 
Longshadow wrote:


Thanks Bill.

Reply
Sep 24, 2021 16:13:06   #
NMGal Loc: NE NM
 
Beautiful city with no apparent excessively tall buildings.

Reply
Sep 24, 2021 16:24:52   #
srfmhg Loc: Marin County, CA
 
NMGal wrote:
Beautiful city with no apparent excessively tall buildings.


It is a beautiful city. Thanks for your comments Barbara.

Reply
 
 
Sep 24, 2021 16:26:43   #
joecichjr Loc: Chicago S. Suburbs, Illinois, USA
 
srfmhg wrote:
My last post of The Kapellbrücke (literally, Chapel Bridge) would not be complete if I didn't post images of some of the magnificent views of the Reuss Rivew taken from the bridge and along the banks.

The Reuss (Swiss German: Rüüss) is a river in Switzerland. With a length of 164 kilometres (102 mi) and a drainage basin of 3,426 square kilometres (1,323 sq mi), it is the fourth largest river in Switzerland (after the Rhine, Aare and Rhône). The upper Reuss forms the main valley of the canton of Uri. The course of the lower Reuss runs from Lake Lucerne to the confluence with the Aare at Brugg and Windisch.

The Reuss is one of the four major rivers taking their source in the Gotthard region, along with the Rhine, Ticino and Rhône.

The Gotthardreuss rises in the Gotthard massif, emerging from Lago di Lucendro (reservoir built in 1947; elevation 2,134 m) in the canton of Ticino and passing into the canton of Uri at Brüggboden (1,910 m).

The Furkareuss rises east of Furka Pass from Schwärziseeli and forms the valley called Urseren, passing Realp at 1,540 m. This source is only around 5km away from, and on the same mountain massif as the source of the Rhône, but will ultimately lead to the opposite side of the continent.

Gotthardreuss and Furkareuss join at Hospental (1,452 m). Downstream of Andermatt (1,432 m) the Reuss passes through Schöllenen Gorge and under the legendary Devil's Bridge. At Göschenen (1,102 m) it is joined by the Göschenerreuss. From here it forms the main valley of the canton of Uri, passing below Wassen (840 m), Gurtnellen (711 m), Silenen (500 m), and through Erstfeld (471 m), past Attinghausen and Altdorf (452 m), joining the southernmost part of Lake Lucerne (the Urnersee) between Flüelen and Seedorf (434 m).

The Reuss leaves Lake Lucerne some 20 km to the north-west, at the city of Lucerne. Notable bridges in Lucerne are the Kapellbrücke, first built 1333, rebuilt 1993 and Spreuerbrücke, built 1408. A needle dam just upstream from the Spreuerbrücke) maintains the water level. It receives the Kleine Emme from Entlebuch at Emmen (432 m). From here, it flows north-east through Buchrain, Root, Gisikon and Honau, and downstream of Honau (402 m) leaves the canton of Lucerne, now forming the border between Aargau and Zug, passing Dietwil (Aargau), Risch-Rotkreuz (Zug), Oberrüti (Aargau) and Sins (Aargau), Hünenberg (Zug) and Mühlau (Aargau). It receives the Lorze from Lake Zug downstream of Maschwanden.

Downstream of this confluence, the Reuss forms the border between Aargau and Zürich, passing Merenschwand (Aargau, 389 m) and Ottenbach (Zurich, 384 m), and enters Aargau downstream of Ottenbach.

The lower Reuss flows along a series of former glacial lakes. Settlements along the river were built on lateral moraines, while the river bed itself was marshy and subject to flooding, and thus unsuitable for settlement. The oldest river crossings are along terminal moraines between the former glacial lakes.

The Reuss valley was under Habsburg Austrian rule during the 14th century.

In the 15th century, the Reuss became the border between territories of the Swiss Confederacy, in 1429 between Lucerne and Zürich, and later between Zug, Zürich and the Freie Ämter condominium, between Freie Ämter and Baden, and between Baden and Berne. The Reuss downstream of Ottenbach came to lie within Aargau with the creation of this canton in 1803.

The Reuss had the status of "imperial road" (freie Reichsstrasse) in the late medieval period. Until 1798, it was the responsibility of cantonal authorities (the Reussherren of Lucerne and Zug) to keep the river navigable. The river was important as waterway for traffic between Lucerne and Zurzach, and via Aare and Rhine to Basel, until the construction of transit roads in the 18th century. River crossings by ferry in the medieval period were at Lunkhofen (mentioned 1160), Windisch, Sins, Mühlau, Oberrüti, and Dietwil. The crossing at Lunkhofen was on the main route from Zürich to Berne. Bridges across the Reuss were in Lucerne, Bremgarten (1230), Mellingen (mentioned 1253) and Gisikon (1432). In 1528, the Catholic cantons blocked the trade routes across the Reuss for Protestant cantons and trade between Zürich and Berne was re-routed through Windisch.

Because ferries and bridges were a source of income, the construction of new crossings was opposed during the early modern period, and only one new bridge was built, commissioned by Zug, at Sins (1640). New bridges were built only after the collapse of the Old Swiss Confederacy, e.g. at Windisch (1799), Ottenbach (1864) and Mühlau (1940).

By the end of the 20th century, there were more than a dozen crossings of the lower Reuss, including a number of railway and motorway bridges.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reuss_%28river%29

I hope you enjoy these images. For additional images of the Chapel Bridge, Lake Lucerne and Lucerne street scenes, please see my previous posts:
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-712513-1.html
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-712232-1.html
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-711865-1.html
Mark
My last post of The Kapellbrücke (literally, Chape... (show quote)


Magnificent, mindbogglingly, eye-catchingly beautiful compositions 💜❤️💛💚🧡💙

Reply
Sep 24, 2021 18:39:31   #
srfmhg Loc: Marin County, CA
 
joecichjr wrote:
Magnificent, mindbogglingly, eye-catchingly beautiful compositions 💜❤️💛💚🧡💙


Thganks so much Joe. I always appreciate your superlative comments!

Reply
Sep 25, 2021 05:39:38   #
nimbushopper Loc: Tampa, FL
 
Beautiful photos!

Reply
Sep 25, 2021 05:47:38   #
J-SPEIGHT Loc: Akron, Ohio
 
srfmhg wrote:
My last post of The Kapellbrücke (literally, Chapel Bridge) would not be complete if I didn't post images of some of the magnificent views of the Reuss Rivew taken from the bridge and along the banks.

The Reuss (Swiss German: Rüüss) is a river in Switzerland. With a length of 164 kilometres (102 mi) and a drainage basin of 3,426 square kilometres (1,323 sq mi), it is the fourth largest river in Switzerland (after the Rhine, Aare and Rhône). The upper Reuss forms the main valley of the canton of Uri. The course of the lower Reuss runs from Lake Lucerne to the confluence with the Aare at Brugg and Windisch.

The Reuss is one of the four major rivers taking their source in the Gotthard region, along with the Rhine, Ticino and Rhône.

The Gotthardreuss rises in the Gotthard massif, emerging from Lago di Lucendro (reservoir built in 1947; elevation 2,134 m) in the canton of Ticino and passing into the canton of Uri at Brüggboden (1,910 m).

The Furkareuss rises east of Furka Pass from Schwärziseeli and forms the valley called Urseren, passing Realp at 1,540 m. This source is only around 5km away from, and on the same mountain massif as the source of the Rhône, but will ultimately lead to the opposite side of the continent.

Gotthardreuss and Furkareuss join at Hospental (1,452 m). Downstream of Andermatt (1,432 m) the Reuss passes through Schöllenen Gorge and under the legendary Devil's Bridge. At Göschenen (1,102 m) it is joined by the Göschenerreuss. From here it forms the main valley of the canton of Uri, passing below Wassen (840 m), Gurtnellen (711 m), Silenen (500 m), and through Erstfeld (471 m), past Attinghausen and Altdorf (452 m), joining the southernmost part of Lake Lucerne (the Urnersee) between Flüelen and Seedorf (434 m).

The Reuss leaves Lake Lucerne some 20 km to the north-west, at the city of Lucerne. Notable bridges in Lucerne are the Kapellbrücke, first built 1333, rebuilt 1993 and Spreuerbrücke, built 1408. A needle dam just upstream from the Spreuerbrücke) maintains the water level. It receives the Kleine Emme from Entlebuch at Emmen (432 m). From here, it flows north-east through Buchrain, Root, Gisikon and Honau, and downstream of Honau (402 m) leaves the canton of Lucerne, now forming the border between Aargau and Zug, passing Dietwil (Aargau), Risch-Rotkreuz (Zug), Oberrüti (Aargau) and Sins (Aargau), Hünenberg (Zug) and Mühlau (Aargau). It receives the Lorze from Lake Zug downstream of Maschwanden.

Downstream of this confluence, the Reuss forms the border between Aargau and Zürich, passing Merenschwand (Aargau, 389 m) and Ottenbach (Zurich, 384 m), and enters Aargau downstream of Ottenbach.

The lower Reuss flows along a series of former glacial lakes. Settlements along the river were built on lateral moraines, while the river bed itself was marshy and subject to flooding, and thus unsuitable for settlement. The oldest river crossings are along terminal moraines between the former glacial lakes.

The Reuss valley was under Habsburg Austrian rule during the 14th century.

In the 15th century, the Reuss became the border between territories of the Swiss Confederacy, in 1429 between Lucerne and Zürich, and later between Zug, Zürich and the Freie Ämter condominium, between Freie Ämter and Baden, and between Baden and Berne. The Reuss downstream of Ottenbach came to lie within Aargau with the creation of this canton in 1803.

The Reuss had the status of "imperial road" (freie Reichsstrasse) in the late medieval period. Until 1798, it was the responsibility of cantonal authorities (the Reussherren of Lucerne and Zug) to keep the river navigable. The river was important as waterway for traffic between Lucerne and Zurzach, and via Aare and Rhine to Basel, until the construction of transit roads in the 18th century. River crossings by ferry in the medieval period were at Lunkhofen (mentioned 1160), Windisch, Sins, Mühlau, Oberrüti, and Dietwil. The crossing at Lunkhofen was on the main route from Zürich to Berne. Bridges across the Reuss were in Lucerne, Bremgarten (1230), Mellingen (mentioned 1253) and Gisikon (1432). In 1528, the Catholic cantons blocked the trade routes across the Reuss for Protestant cantons and trade between Zürich and Berne was re-routed through Windisch.

Because ferries and bridges were a source of income, the construction of new crossings was opposed during the early modern period, and only one new bridge was built, commissioned by Zug, at Sins (1640). New bridges were built only after the collapse of the Old Swiss Confederacy, e.g. at Windisch (1799), Ottenbach (1864) and Mühlau (1940).

By the end of the 20th century, there were more than a dozen crossings of the lower Reuss, including a number of railway and motorway bridges.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reuss_%28river%29

I hope you enjoy these images. For additional images of the Chapel Bridge, Lake Lucerne and Lucerne street scenes, please see my previous posts:
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-712513-1.html
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-712232-1.html
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-711865-1.html
Mark
My last post of The Kapellbrücke (literally, Chape... (show quote)

Nice set Mark

Reply
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