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This is a handout that I came up with for one of my photography classes I teach
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Sep 12, 2021 10:01:18   #
grandpaw
 
I have posted this before but it may help a lot of new photographers understand their camera settings.


(Download)

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Sep 12, 2021 10:06:14   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
The bottom statement is misleading. The aperture and shutter speed are the factors that affect the amount of light entering the camera. ISO is not related to that.
--Bob
grandpaw wrote:
I have posted this before but it may help a lot of new photographers understand their camera settings.

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Sep 12, 2021 10:17:27   #
grandpaw
 
rmalarz wrote:
The bottom statement is misleading. The aperture and shutter speed are the factors that affect the amount of light entering the camera. ISO is not related to that.
--Bob


You are technically correct that ISO doesn't change the amount of light coming into the camera but it will amplify the amount of light or cut the amplification in half that is produced by the aperture and or shutter speed by moving to the left or right.

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Sep 12, 2021 10:20:24   #
LEWHITE7747 Loc: 33773
 
grandpaw wrote:
I have posted this before but it may help a lot of new photographers understand their camera settings.


I think this will help new people and how light affects their photography. The iso is a little confusing but I think if it is explained it should be no problem.

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Sep 12, 2021 10:23:10   #
Hip Coyote
 
grandpaw wrote:
I have posted this before but it may help a lot of new photographers understand their camera settings.


I like it a lot. The iso thing is tricky because it has to do with sensor sensitivity. Maybe “light coming into or recorded by camera?” Not sure exactly. It your does makes sense to me.

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Sep 12, 2021 10:28:54   #
Abo Loc: Victoria Australia
 
grandpaw wrote:
I have posted this before but it may help a lot of new photographers understand their camera settings.


For a student, the table you have created is an excellent learning tool IMHO.

The (pedantic?) issue with ISO, not actually letting in more light, could
be addressed by adding a foot note, explaining that the ISO
amplifies the signal (by said factor), rather than actually
adjusting the amount of light.

Good work Sir.

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Sep 12, 2021 10:33:35   #
grandpaw
 
This is a handout that I give out in my class and explain all of this when I hand it out. I think you can see what I am trying to get across is how the settings affect each other. I try and make it a simple as to understand as possible. If I would have left out the last three words, "into your camera", and everyone would be happy.

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Sep 12, 2021 10:41:18   #
Charlie157 Loc: San Diego, CA
 
My opinion, for what its worth, is that I so does affect the light coming into the camera. If you meter in on a subject the values of both the shutter speed and aperture have a certain value. Change the iso the values of the shutter and aperture changes.

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Sep 12, 2021 11:14:38   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
Charlie, exposure is simply amount of light and duration of that amount of light. It becomes a photographic exposure when a photosensitive material is placed at the receiving end of that aforementioned light.

Yes, photography is somewhat technical and conversations regarding photography need to have commonly understood terms in order to have those conversations have clear meaning.
--Bob
Charlie157 wrote:
My opinion, for what its worth, is that I so does affect the light coming into the camera. If you meter in on a subject the values of both the shutter speed and aperture have a certain value. Change the iso the values of the shutter and aperture changes.

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Sep 12, 2021 11:14:54   #
pumakat
 
Thank you for this. I don't get out taking pictures too often and this will be a good reminder for folks like me.

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Sep 12, 2021 11:45:14   #
LEWHITE7747 Loc: 33773
 
rmalarz wrote:
Charlie, exposure is simply amount of light and duration of that amount of light. It becomes a photographic exposure when a photosensitive material is placed at the receiving end of that aforementioned light.

Yes, photography is somewhat technical and conversations regarding photography need to have commonly understood terms in order to have those conversations have clear meaning.

Conversely, if your statement is correct, how, exactly, does ISO affect the amount of light coming into the camera?
--Bob
Charlie, exposure is simply amount of light and du... (show quote)


I understand you are taking the statement verbatim. If all settings were on automatic and only the iso was a set number the amount of light would change to accomdate the iso number. Shutter speeed and aperature would adjust to accomadate said iso number. In this way iso would affect the amount of light coming into the camera. I would agree the statement is confusing.

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Sep 12, 2021 11:52:31   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
Your statement is true. However, exposure deals only with aperture and shutter speed. If one wishes to capture an image then an photosensitive material becomes involved, and, thus, its sensitivity has to be taken into account.
--Bob
LEWHITE7747 wrote:
I understand you are taking the statement verbatim. If all settings were on automatic and only the iso was a set number the amount of light would change to accomdate the iso number. Shutter speeed and aperature would adjust to accomadate said iso number. In this way iso would affect the amount of light coming into the camera. I would agree the statement is confusing.

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Sep 12, 2021 12:05:29   #
OwlHarbor Loc: Pacific North West USA
 
ISO is what ASA used to be with film. Rather than changing film ASA rating, you switch ISO. With that said the higher ASA or ISO the more sensitive the film or chip. The higher the ISO either you have to increase the shutter speed or close the iris (make the hole smaller) I have taught a few classes over the years to beginning students and taken many classes. The last one I took the instructor was a beginning photographer teaching beginning photography. He had never experienced film cameras. It is like a dance with Apture, shutter speed, and ISO, and lenses. He had the technicalities down but had difficulties understanding the effect of ISO and did not understand ASA. Digital in my view is much better than film because of its versatility. ISO is a setting on the camera while ASA you had to change the film out. RAW, HDR are things that come closer to what we view with our eyes. The point I see a student could think that the chart you provided is a constant and it maybe but I not sure of that.

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Sep 12, 2021 12:09:07   #
LEWHITE7747 Loc: 33773
 
rmalarz wrote:
Your statement is true. However, exposure deals only with aperture and shutter speed. If one wishes to capture an image then an photosensitive material becomes involved, and, thus, its sensitivity has to be taken into account.
--Bob


I guess you lost me with the photosensitive material thing. I think we can all agree that the iso statement is indeed confusing and could have been presented in a different manner. My statement being true is still not the way one would approach controlling exposure..

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Sep 12, 2021 12:18:52   #
R.G. Loc: Scotland
 
ISO determines how much amplification the sensor signal is given and in doing so it affects the brightness of the exposure, but it is just wrong to say that ISO affects how much light is captured. If you continue to say so you risk losing credibility, which isn't a good thing to happen to a teacher.

It won't be difficult to explain how aperture and shutter speed affect the amount of light that's captured when taking a shot, and it'll be obvious that when you amplify the sensor signal you amplify any noise along with it. If someone asks how ISO affects the amount of light captured you risk getting embroiled in complicated explanations that won't be based on the facts of the matter.

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