Ugly Hedgehog - Photography Forum
Home Active Topics Newest Pictures Search Login Register
Main Photography Discussion
Straightening curved pano shorelines
Page 1 of 2 next>
Jul 31, 2021 17:20:23   #
UTMike Loc: South Jordan, UT
 
At one point I had a great tutorial as to how to straighten the curvature introduced by multiple photo panorama merges. I cannot find it now.

Any guidance, tutorials would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Reply
Jul 31, 2021 17:24:14   #
NJFrank Loc: New Jersey
 
Mike not sure, but I think both LF and PS will allow you to make the corrections. I know that really doesn't answer your question but at least it is a start. For me when all else fails i go to YouTube.

Reply
Jul 31, 2021 17:29:40   #
UTMike Loc: South Jordan, UT
 
NJFrank wrote:
Mike not sure, but I think both LF and PS will allow you to make the corrections. I know that really doesn't answer your question but at least it is a start. For me when all else fails i go to YouTube.


Thanks, Frank.

Reply
 
 
Jul 31, 2021 17:43:11   #
quixdraw Loc: American Free States -- Montana
 
UTMike wrote:
At one point I had a great tutorial as to how to straighten the curvature introduced by multiple photo panorama merges. I cannot find it now.

Any guidance, tutorials would be appreciated.

Thanks.


Not much of a post guy, but a tip I got from someone here is to shoot panos in Portrait orientation. It appears to reduce the distortion. Yes, the horse is gone and the barn door is open on the past stuff!

Reply
Jul 31, 2021 18:16:57   #
NMGal Loc: NE NM
 
Mike, all you need to do is cuss loud and long, click on everything in sight, take a deep breath and viola! There it happens.

Reply
Jul 31, 2021 18:37:49   #
Cany143 Loc: SE Utah
 
After merging multiple images in Lr, if there's any unintended curvature in the result, I'll right-click to 'Edit In' Ps. There, >Select >All >Edit >Transform >Warp and move/manipulate any of the top or side 'dots,' or left-click mouse to 'drag' one or more portions of the image, to the point that the curvature is eliminated. It only takes seconds, and admittedly it is done 'by eye' as opposed to anything formulaic, but it does work.

Reply
Jul 31, 2021 18:58:46   #
Cany143 Loc: SE Utah
 
quixdraw wrote:
Not much of a post guy, but a tip I got from someone here is to shoot panos in Portrait orientation. It appears to reduce the distortion. Yes, the horse is gone and the barn door is open on the past stuff!


Even though you may not be a post guy, its worth mentioning that a primary reason for shooting pano segments in Portrait orientation is that by doing so, its more likely (if one plans to do so in advance) that the 'film plane' (the sensor) will be perpendicular in relation to the subject. (i.e., in relation to the plane of the Earth rather than --necessarily-- the 'horizon' since in places other than large bodies of water or Kansas, the 'horizon' may be higher or lower than the 'Earth's actual' horizon. The result of tilting the 'film plane' up or down results in the keystone-ing that produces unwanted curvatures in a merged pano. It may seem counter-intuitive --and the 'throws pixels away' crowd may balk-- but if the final shot has been properly planned, and has been effectively 'over shot' by potentially including more top or more bottom than may be wanted (and will by plan be subsequently cropped off), shooting in that portrait orientation will all but eliminate unwanted curvatures, and the intended composition can be had.

Reply
 
 
Jul 31, 2021 19:19:11   #
quixdraw Loc: American Free States -- Montana
 
Cany143 wrote:
Even though you may not be a post guy, its worth mentioning that a primary reason for shooting pano segments in Portrait orientation is that by doing so, its more likely (if one plans to do so in advance) that the 'film plane' (the sensor) will be perpendicular in relation to the subject. (i.e., in relation to the plane of the Earth rather than --necessarily-- the 'horizon' since in places other than large bodies of water or Kansas, the 'horizon' may be higher or lower than the 'Earth's actual' horizon. The result of tilting the 'film plane' up or down results in the keystone-ing that produces unwanted curvatures in a merged pano. It may seem counter-intuitive --and the 'throws pixels away' crowd may balk-- but if the final shot has been properly planned, and has been effectively 'over shot' by potentially including more top or more bottom than may be wanted (and will by plan be subsequently cropped off), shooting in that portrait orientation will all but eliminate unwanted curvatures, and the intended composition can be had.
Even though you may not be a post guy, its worth m... (show quote)


Thanks for the info! I have the old Nikon Pan head, which I still use on occasion when sufficiently motivated. Panning, like many things has analogs in other activities. I don't do it often, but enjoy the challenge, and the outcome when it works well.

Reply
Jul 31, 2021 19:59:34   #
Cany143 Loc: SE Utah
 
quixdraw wrote:
Thanks for the info! I have the old Nikon Pan head, which I still use on occasion when sufficiently motivated. Panning, like many things has analogs in other activities. I don't do it often, but enjoy the challenge, and the outcome when it works well.


Even though they tend to be heavier (generally) and a bit more cumbersome (not to mention having arms that stick out at ungainly angles that sometimes poke you in places you don't want to get poked), all my tripods have 3-way pan/tilt heads mounted on them. I shoot a lot of panos, and whenever I use one of the tripods to shoot 'em, I null the level bubbles before I shoot. Thing is, though, probably 80% of the time I'll be somewhere weird (oh, and I'm incredibly lazy, too, so more often than not, the tripods are left laying on the floor in front of the back seat in my Jeep instead of being out there in the weirdness with me) so what panos I shoot get mostly shot hand held. A dozen images side to side? No problem. Two or three rows of however many images, yeah, a little trickier, but still, no problem. Do something enuf times, and think about what you're going to do before you do it, and maybe everything isn't "perfect" but its perfect enough that with a little warp or skew or something that nobody --other than me-- will ever be aware of, and it'll pass muster. Or you won't see it.

Reply
Jul 31, 2021 20:00:50   #
quixdraw Loc: American Free States -- Montana
 
Cany143 wrote:
Even though they tend to be heavier (generally) and a bit more cumbersome (not to mention having arms that stick out at ungainly angles that sometimes get in the way), all my tripods have 3-way pan/tilt heads mounted on them. I shoot a lot of panos, and whenever I use one of the tripods to shoot 'em, I null the level bubbles before I shoot. Thing is, though, probably 80% of the time I'll be somewhere weird (oh, and I'm incredibly lazy, too, so more often than not, the tripods are left laying on the floor in front of the back seat in my Jeep instead of being out there in the weirdness with me) so what panos I shoot get mostly shot hand held. A dozen images side to side? No problem. Two or three rows of however many images, yeah, a little trickier, but still, no problem. Do something enuf times, and think about what you're going to do before you do it, and maybe everything isn't "perfect" but its perfect enough with a little warp or skew or something that nobody --other than me-- will ever be aware of.
Even though they tend to be heavier (generally) an... (show quote)



Reply
Jul 31, 2021 20:47:02   #
UTMike Loc: South Jordan, UT
 
quixdraw wrote:
Not much of a post guy, but a tip I got from someone here is to shoot panos in Portrait orientation. It appears to reduce the distortion. Yes, the horse is gone and the barn door is open on the past stuff!


There is always tomorrow, QD, thanks.

Reply
 
 
Jul 31, 2021 20:48:10   #
UTMike Loc: South Jordan, UT
 
Cany143 wrote:
Even though they tend to be heavier (generally) and a bit more cumbersome (not to mention having arms that stick out at ungainly angles that sometimes poke you in places you don't want to get poked), all my tripods have 3-way pan/tilt heads mounted on them. I shoot a lot of panos, and whenever I use one of the tripods to shoot 'em, I null the level bubbles before I shoot. Thing is, though, probably 80% of the time I'll be somewhere weird (oh, and I'm incredibly lazy, too, so more often than not, the tripods are left laying on the floor in front of the back seat in my Jeep instead of being out there in the weirdness with me) so what panos I shoot get mostly shot hand held. A dozen images side to side? No problem. Two or three rows of however many images, yeah, a little trickier, but still, no problem. Do something enuf times, and think about what you're going to do before you do it, and maybe everything isn't "perfect" but its perfect enough that with a little warp or skew or something that nobody --other than me-- will ever be aware of, and it'll pass muster. Or you won't see it.
Even though they tend to be heavier (generally) an... (show quote)


Yeah, Jim, but you will see it and give me grief (LOL).

Reply
Jul 31, 2021 20:50:52   #
UTMike Loc: South Jordan, UT
 
NMGal wrote:
Mike, all you need to do is cuss loud and long, click on everything in sight, take a deep breath and viola! There it happens.


We evidently have been using the same approach, Barbara.

Reply
Jul 31, 2021 20:51:40   #
Cany143 Loc: SE Utah
 
UTMike wrote:
Yeah, Jim, but you will see it and give me grief (LOL).


Mike.... I'll give you grief whether I see it or not. You oughta know that.

Reply
Jul 31, 2021 20:51:44   #
UTMike Loc: South Jordan, UT
 
Cany143 wrote:
After merging multiple images in Lr, if there's any unintended curvature in the result, I'll right-click to 'Edit In' Ps. There, >Select >All >Edit >Transform >Warp and move/manipulate any of the top or side 'dots,' or left-click mouse to 'drag' one or more portions of the image, to the point that the curvature is eliminated. It only takes seconds, and admittedly it is done 'by eye' as opposed to anything formulaic, but it does work.


Domo arigato, sensei.

Reply
Page 1 of 2 next>
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
Main Photography Discussion
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2021 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.