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Heat and smoke damage
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Jul 20, 2021 12:45:58   #
Alby144 Loc: Northern Nevada
 
Our garage caught on fire and burned down along with part of out home. The clean-up contractor tells us there are indications that the rooms that did not burn have indications of temperatures exceeding 1200°. The heat and smoke damage is insane. What did not burn has been damaged by heat and smoke. Basically they have declared most of what is in our home to be non-salvageable.

I have a Nikon D7200 with 18-140mm lens attached, which was on the tripod in my home office. I keep my lenses in a camera back pack, but it was unzipped and open. I e-mailed Nikon to find out what the likelihood of them being good after this fire would be and received a reply telling me what to do to send it to them for service. So, I am wondering if anybody here has had any experience with this type of issue? I

If my camera and lenses are non-salvageable then so be it and I'll have to replace them, but I'd like to know the likelihood of them being salvageable. Any help would be appreciated - if you have some real knowledge on the subject.

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Jul 20, 2021 13:25:27   #
NMGal Loc: NE NM
 
Have you tried to use any of them?

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Jul 20, 2021 13:26:21   #
Ava'sPapa Loc: Cheshire, Ct.
 
Alby144 wrote:
Our garage caught on fire and burned down along with part of out home. The clean-up contractor tells us there are indications that the rooms that did not burn have indications of temperatures exceeding 1200°. The heat and smoke damage is insane. What did not burn has been damaged by heat and smoke. Basically they have declared most of what is in our home to be non-salvageable.

I have a Nikon D7200 with 18-140mm lens attached, which was on the tripod in my home office. I keep my lenses in a camera back pack, but it was unzipped and open. I e-mailed Nikon to find out what the likelihood of them being good after this fire would be and received a reply telling me what to do to send it to them for service. So, I am wondering if anybody here has had any experience with this type of issue? I

If my camera and lenses are non-salvageable then so be it and I'll have to replace them, but I'd like to know the likelihood of them being salvageable. Any help would be appreciated - if you have some real knowledge on the subject.
Our garage caught on fire and burned down along wi... (show quote)


How're you going to know unless Nikon tells you? Have you tried using them? Do they work at all?

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Jul 20, 2021 13:40:32   #
Longshadow Loc: Audubon, PA, United States
 
Dang, sorry that happened!

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Jul 20, 2021 13:56:25   #
Alby144 Loc: Northern Nevada
 
NMGal wrote:
Have you tried to use any of them?


I have not tried using them, as we are in the beginnings of the clean-up process. I have been told the smoke and chemicals in the smoke create acid that continues to corrode electronics...they don't want to risk anything that is not low voltage and told us eventually they will be a fire hazard.

At this point I am inclined to allow everything to be considered non-salvageable. I was just wondering if anybody else here has had any experience with smoke and heat damage to their gear, due to fire.

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Jul 20, 2021 14:21:58   #
Najataagihe
 
Smoke and heat with cameras: no.


Smoke and heat with electronic circuit boards: Oh, my Heavens, do I ever!

(Telephone company switching computers (mainframes), peripherals, PCs, etc.)



Consider ALL your camera gear non-salvageable.

That includes cases, filters, flash, etc.


:(

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Jul 20, 2021 14:28:02   #
BebuLamar
 
Alby144 wrote:
I have not tried using them, as we are in the beginnings of the clean-up process. I have been told the smoke and chemicals in the smoke create acid that continues to corrode electronics...they don't want to risk anything that is not low voltage and told us eventually they will be a fire hazard.

At this point I am inclined to allow everything to be considered non-salvageable. I was just wondering if anybody else here has had any experience with smoke and heat damage to their gear, due to fire.
I have not tried using them, as we are in the begi... (show quote)


If the insurance will pay you then it's OK. Otherwise, I would turn the camera on and test. I am not afraid of any danger a damage camera would make.

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Jul 20, 2021 14:45:59   #
Gene51 Loc: Yonkers, NY, now in LSD (LowerSlowerDelaware)
 
Alby144 wrote:
Our garage caught on fire and burned down along with part of out home. The clean-up contractor tells us there are indications that the rooms that did not burn have indications of temperatures exceeding 1200°. The heat and smoke damage is insane. What did not burn has been damaged by heat and smoke. Basically they have declared most of what is in our home to be non-salvageable.

I have a Nikon D7200 with 18-140mm lens attached, which was on the tripod in my home office. I keep my lenses in a camera back pack, but it was unzipped and open. I e-mailed Nikon to find out what the likelihood of them being good after this fire would be and received a reply telling me what to do to send it to them for service. So, I am wondering if anybody here has had any experience with this type of issue? I

If my camera and lenses are non-salvageable then so be it and I'll have to replace them, but I'd like to know the likelihood of them being salvageable. Any help would be appreciated - if you have some real knowledge on the subject.
Our garage caught on fire and burned down along wi... (show quote)


The three lenses in the images below were locked in a trunk on a Volvo that caught fire after being rear-ended. Who was the genius that came up with putting the battery in the trunk - not very far from the gas tank. Must have been during the Ford/Volvo collaboration.

Anyway, all three were refurbished and I still have them all, 8 years later. I had been reimbursed by insurance, but while that was being settled, I needed to purchase replacements. I ended up selling the replacements and keeping the ones that were repaired by Nikon and Sigma. The residue was caused by the extreme heat melting plastics, composites and vinyl in the trunk, and later the chemical used to put the fire out. Between the D700 and the lenses, there was almost $8,000 in camera and lenses in the fire -


(Download)


(Download)


(Download)

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Jul 20, 2021 14:54:17   #
Alby144 Loc: Northern Nevada
 
Wow...those look far worse than mine.

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Jul 20, 2021 14:55:55   #
Alby144 Loc: Northern Nevada
 
Najataagihe wrote:
Smoke and heat with cameras: no.


Smoke and heat with electronic circuit boards: Oh, my Heavens, do I ever!

(Telephone company switching computers (mainframes), peripherals, PCs, etc.)



Consider ALL your camera gear non-salvageable.

That includes cases, filters, flash, etc.


:(


I may take this advice, as I certainly don't want to run into problems down the raod, when I could have replaced them via our insurance. Fortunately we have very good coverage...

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Jul 20, 2021 14:59:20   #
joecichjr Loc: Chicago S. Suburbs, Illinois, USA
 
Gene51 wrote:
The three lenses in the images below were locked in a trunk on a Volvo that caught fire after being rear-ended. Who was the genius that came up with putting the battery in the trunk - not very far from the gas tank. Must have been during the Ford/Volvo collaboration.

Anyway, all three were refurbished and I still have them all, 8 years later. I had been reimbursed by insurance, but while that was being settled, I needed to purchase replacements. I ended up selling the replacements and keeping the ones that were repaired by Nikon and Sigma. The residue was caused by the extreme heat melting plastics, composites and vinyl in the trunk, and later the chemical used to put the fire out. Between the D700 and the lenses, there was almost $8,000 in camera and lenses in the fire -
The three lenses in the images below were locked i... (show quote)


Wow - talk about built to last

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Jul 20, 2021 15:21:39   #
Gene51 Loc: Yonkers, NY, now in LSD (LowerSlowerDelaware)
 
Najataagihe wrote:
Smoke and heat with cameras: no.


Smoke and heat with electronic circuit boards: Oh, my Heavens, do I ever!

(Telephone company switching computers (mainframes), peripherals, PCs, etc.)



Consider ALL your camera gear non-salvageable.

That includes cases, filters, flash, etc.


:(


Nonesense. Let the camera techs evaluate the damage. As you can see in my images, everything was, by your definition, non-salvageable. However, Nikon and Sigma had a different opinion. For a 20% - 25% of the price of new replacements the lenses were fixed and as they say, "better than new" when I got them back.

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Jul 20, 2021 15:40:22   #
krl48 Loc: South Cackalackee by way of NY & PA
 
Consider this advice....https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cAKb-mnr-KU


Sorry for your misfortune.

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Jul 20, 2021 16:22:03   #
Gene51 Loc: Yonkers, NY, now in LSD (LowerSlowerDelaware)
 
Alby144 wrote:
Wow...those look far worse than mine.


These were gold ring lenses (Nikon) and the Sigma was not one of their consumer lenses, and presumably built to a higher quality standard. This is why it's worth your while to have Nikon check your stuff. If the body wasn't melted, then there is a chance it can be repaired if there is something wrong. It could cost you a few hundred dollars, but if it can be fixed you'll have a good camera.

There is something fishy about a room that was presumably exposed to 1200°F - but had no fire in it. Especially when the paper facing on drywall ignites at 451° and wooden moldings ignite immediately at temps as low as 700°. If your camera was exposed to 1200° it would have looked a lot worse than mine.

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Jul 20, 2021 16:23:42   #
BebuLamar
 
Gene51 wrote:
These were gold ring lenses (Nikon) and the Sigma was not one of their consumer lenses, and presumably built to a higher quality standard. This is why it's worth your while to have Nikon check your stuff. If the body wasn't melted, then there is a chance it can be repaired if there is something wrong. It could cost you a few hundred dollars, but if it can be fixed you'll have a good camera.

There is something fishy about a room that was presumably exposed to 1200°F - but had no fire in it. Especially when the paper facing on drywall ignites at 451° and wooden moldings ignite immediately at temps as low as 700°. If your camera was exposed to 1200° it would have looked a lot worse than mine.
These were gold ring lenses (Nikon) and the Sigma ... (show quote)


The camera has a lot of plastic if the temp is 1200 degrees all plastic would be liquid and gone.

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