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Long Exposure
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Jun 20, 2021 18:00:56   #
GiGiMac103 Loc: Garden State
 
I chose this topic because I struggle with it and would like to improve my skills. Please show me your long exposure shots and include your camera settings as well, if possible.

From Wikipedia: Long-exposure, time-exposure, or slow-shutter photography involves using a long-duration shutter speed to sharply capture the stationary elements of images while blurring, smearing, or obscuring the moving elements. Long-exposure photography captures one element that conventional photography does not: an extended period of time.

Technique: Whereas there is no fixed definition of what constitutes "long", the intent is to create a photo that somehow shows the effect of passing time, be it smoother waters or light trails. A 30-minute photo of a static object and surrounding cannot be distinguished from a short exposure, hence, the inclusion of motion is the main factor to add intrigue to long exposure photos. Images with exposure times of several minutes also tend to make moving people or dark objects disappear (because they are in any one spot for only a fraction of the exposure time), often adding a serene and otherworldly appearance to long exposure photos.
Settings for all: Shutter Priority F36 @ 1/8 100 ISO using an ND4 filter
Settings for all:  Shutter Priority F36 @ 1/8 100 ...
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Jun 20, 2021 18:09:47   #
WCS
 
Thanks for sharing your experiments! They really 'work'!
I did not expect 1/8th of second exposure to get this type of result - good to know!
f32? Whoa! I haven't a lens that can stop down that much.
Well done and thank you so much GiGiMac 103~

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Jun 20, 2021 18:11:03   #
GiGiMac103 Loc: Garden State
 
WCS wrote:
Thanks for sharing your experiments! They really 'work'!
I did not expect 1/8th of second exposure to get this type of result - good to know!
f32? Whoa! I haven't a lens that can stop down that much.
Well done and thank you so much GiGiMac 103~


Thank you so much, I appreciate your kind comment!

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Jun 20, 2021 18:21:27   #
SWFeral Loc: SWNM
 
Of these photos, I find #2 the most pleasing for its composition, colors, and flow of water. You're probably already finding out that it's never enough to get one rushing water photo, whether sharp or blurred; you can take twenty photos and they'll all look different. I know a lot of people fuss about "milky" or "cotton candy" water, but I think the contrast between stationary objects in sharp focus and blurred water or clouds or whatever can be compelling.

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Jun 20, 2021 18:25:17   #
GiGiMac103 Loc: Garden State
 
SWFeral wrote:
Of these photos, I find #2 the most pleasing for its composition, colors, and flow of water. You're probably already finding out that it's never enough to get one rushing water photo, whether sharp or blurred; you can take twenty photos and they'll all look different. I know a lot of people fuss about "milky" or "cotton candy" water, but I think the contrast between stationary objects in sharp focus and blurred water or clouds or whatever can be compelling.


I can agree with you on all points, addicting and frustrating all at the same time! #2 is one of about 65 shots I took of that rock. Thank you for your comment, it is very much appreciated.

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Jun 20, 2021 19:51:18   #
Photogirl17 Loc: Glenwood, Ark.
 
GiGiMac103 wrote:
I chose this topic because I struggle with it and would like to improve my skills. Please show me your long exposure shots and include your camera settings as well, if possible.

From Wikipedia: Long-exposure, time-exposure, or slow-shutter photography involves using a long-duration shutter speed to sharply capture the stationary elements of images while blurring, smearing, or obscuring the moving elements. Long-exposure photography captures one element that conventional photography does not: an extended period of time.

Technique: Whereas there is no fixed definition of what constitutes "long", the intent is to create a photo that somehow shows the effect of passing time, be it smoother waters or light trails. A 30-minute photo of a static object and surrounding cannot be distinguished from a short exposure, hence, the inclusion of motion is the main factor to add intrigue to long exposure photos. Images with exposure times of several minutes also tend to make moving people or dark objects disappear (because they are in any one spot for only a fraction of the exposure time), often adding a serene and otherworldly appearance to long exposure photos.
I chose this topic because I struggle with it and ... (show quote)


Great start Nancy..I'll get some together..

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Jun 20, 2021 20:06:12   #
Transbuff1985 Loc: east central Iowa
 
GiGiMac103 wrote:
I chose this topic because I struggle with it and would like to improve my skills. Please show me your long exposure shots and include your camera settings as well, if possible.

From Wikipedia: Long-exposure, time-exposure, or slow-shutter photography involves using a long-duration shutter speed to sharply capture the stationary elements of images while blurring, smearing, or obscuring the moving elements. Long-exposure photography captures one element that conventional photography does not: an extended period of time.

Technique: Whereas there is no fixed definition of what constitutes "long", the intent is to create a photo that somehow shows the effect of passing time, be it smoother waters or light trails. A 30-minute photo of a static object and surrounding cannot be distinguished from a short exposure, hence, the inclusion of motion is the main factor to add intrigue to long exposure photos. Images with exposure times of several minutes also tend to make moving people or dark objects disappear (because they are in any one spot for only a fraction of the exposure time), often adding a serene and otherworldly appearance to long exposure photos.
I chose this topic because I struggle with it and ... (show quote)


Great start Nancy - good examples - THANKS FOR HOSTING!

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Jun 20, 2021 20:43:56   #
GiGiMac103 Loc: Garden State
 
Photogirl17 wrote:
Great start Nancy..I'll get some together..


Thank you and I'm looking forward to seeing them!

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Jun 20, 2021 20:44:46   #
GiGiMac103 Loc: Garden State
 
Transbuff1985 wrote:
Great start Nancy - good examples - THANKS FOR HOSTING!


Thank you and it is my pleasure!

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Jun 21, 2021 06:26:20   #
Fstop12 Loc: Kentucky
 
For me, your last image is my favorite! May I ask why you chose F36, instead of, say F16 or less? I am just starting to learn about this style of photography. I recently purchased a NISI filter kit. Am I correct in saying the reason 1/8 shutter speed gave you that silky smooth look on the last shot was because the water was moving very fast? So the slower whatever the object in your scene is moving,Clouds, water, etc, the longer the shutter speed you will need in order to reach silky smooth or maxium blur, right? Just trying to wrap my ahead around the process.

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Jun 21, 2021 07:21:47   #
Triplets Loc: Reading, MA
 
GiGiMac103 wrote:
I chose this topic because I struggle with it and would like to improve my skills. Please show me your long exposure shots and include your camera settings as well, if possible.

From Wikipedia: Long-exposure, time-exposure, or slow-shutter photography involves using a long-duration shutter speed to sharply capture the stationary elements of images while blurring, smearing, or obscuring the moving elements. Long-exposure photography captures one element that conventional photography does not: an extended period of time.

Technique: Whereas there is no fixed definition of what constitutes "long", the intent is to create a photo that somehow shows the effect of passing time, be it smoother waters or light trails. A 30-minute photo of a static object and surrounding cannot be distinguished from a short exposure, hence, the inclusion of motion is the main factor to add intrigue to long exposure photos. Images with exposure times of several minutes also tend to make moving people or dark objects disappear (because they are in any one spot for only a fraction of the exposure time), often adding a serene and otherworldly appearance to long exposure photos.
I chose this topic because I struggle with it and ... (show quote)


These were taken during a workshop along the Kancamagus Highyway in New Hampshire.

First Image -- f/16, 8 seconds, ISO 100, 6 Stop ND Filter

Second Image -- f/11, 1.6 seconds, ISO 200, 6 Stop ND Filter


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(Download)

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Jun 21, 2021 08:16:15   #
Bbarn Loc: Ohio
 
Very nice shots. Do you recall what brand of ND filter was used?

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Jun 21, 2021 08:37:14   #
Triplets Loc: Reading, MA
 
Bbarn wrote:
Very nice shots. Do you recall what brand of ND filter was used?


https://breakthrough.photography/pages/nd-buying-guide

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Jun 21, 2021 09:27:17   #
Rick from NY Loc: Metro NYC
 
Koi pond at Selby Gardens in Sarasota FL. Nikon D850 and 24-70/2.8. No ND filter used. Just slow shutter speed.



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Jun 21, 2021 10:08:19   #
David Martin Loc: Cary, NC
 
f/36, 145mm, 30 seconds, ISO 100, 6-stop ND filter


(Download)

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