Ugly Hedgehog - Photography Forum
Home Active Topics Newest Pictures Search Login Register
Main Photography Discussion
Breaking the Rules
Page 1 of 7 next> last>>
Jun 8, 2021 03:50:10   #
Wallen
 
With so many rules binding us, more rules to photography, specifically about composition seems to be an unwelcome guest.

Truth is, calling them rules is a misnomer. They are actually guides.
To give an example, Symmetry is opposite the Rule of Thirds. If they are both rules, one of them will be wrong.
These rules come about from studies & observation of what creates a desired effect and why they do.
I for example has my own rules -The Rule of Shadows, Make a Hero & Shoot to Purpose. This came from my experience in animation, graphic design & advertising.

Why have rules? They are invaluable tools in understanding and therefore repeating or aiming for a specific outcome. They are also good for sharing the "technique" so others understand and can repeat a desired effect.

It is true that just relying on one's own "eye" can create a good image. But knowing the rules allows one to be more consistent. It also allows for planning ahead and shooting for a purpose, not just for aesthetics and relying on luck.

Repetitive use makes it second nature will not not slow down action nor the creativity. They can be a fallback when given a challenging circumstance and finally a person's style of photography.

Again they are guides. If someone sticks to them by the letter, the photo can become too repetitive, mechanical & rigid. Probably here is where the tenet, "breaking the rules came into being", misunderstanding that they were not rules at all.

Below is a visual example of how rules guides get created and how they work or how they are applied.

1. On the first row we can see the same image repeated.
2. On the second row, we add lips and a bow that is slightly changing in shape & distance from the initial graphic.
Here we can see that the simple adjustment changes the age of the face.

3. Using a guideline for comparison, the changes are more visible.
4. We now finish with some details to support our intent to show age.
-3a mouth is adjusted. Made a little bit smaller in 4A.
-4c & 4d actually have the exact same hair but they still look a different age.

From this sample we can invent some rules for ourselves, should we want to draw the same person in different ages. We can do that by understanding what changes. Like the proportion of the face changes with age. We can say the rule of age is that the face becomes longer and more oval with time . Also in observing that a rounder face looks younger, we can use that as (one of the) creative technique if we are designing a character, thereby using the rule as guide to plan ahead a composition.

Simply put, composition in photography, is the relationship, appearance and the unifying effect of all the elements in a photo.

And the rules of composition are just guides for arranging the elements to fit a predetermined output. One must not strive to know the rules but rather to understand it. Why such arrangement works and hence know by heart what it does, thus becoming creative to how far one can play with or break it.


(Download)

Reply
Jun 8, 2021 05:55:12   #
dpullum Loc: Tampa Florida
 
Wallen said in part, " rules of composition are just guides for arranging the elements to fit a predetermined output. One must not strive to know the rules but rather to understand them. Why such arrangement works and hence know by heart what it does, thus becoming creative to how far one can play with or break it."
So True ... Wallen is right.

Images are the visual reward of an effective photo... tickles the brain to react. A helpful free ever-expanding book about Image Composition and how the mind reacts is "Photographic Psychology: Image and Psyche"
http://truecenterpublishing.com/photopsy/article_index.htm

Reply
Jun 8, 2021 06:36:37   #
lamiaceae Loc: San Luis Obispo County, CA
 
Wallen wrote:
With so many rules binding us, more rules to photography, specifically about composition seems to be an unwelcome guest.

Truth is, calling them rules is a misnomer. They are actually guides.
To give an example, Symmetry is opposite the Rule of Thirds. If they are both rules, one of them will be wrong.
These rules come about from studies & observation of what creates a desired effect and why they do.
I for example has my own rules -The Rule of Shadows, Make a Hero & Shoot to Purpose. This came from my experience in animation, graphic design & advertising.

Why have rules? They are invaluable tools in understanding and therefore repeating or aiming for a specific outcome. They are also good for sharing the "technique" so others understand and can repeat a desired effect.

It is true that just relying on one's own "eye" can create a good image. But knowing the rules allows one to be more consistent. It also allows for planning ahead and shooting for a purpose, not just for aesthetics and relying on luck.

Repetitive use makes it second nature will not not slow down action nor the creativity. They can be a fallback when given a challenging circumstance and finally a person's style of photography.

Again they are guides. If someone sticks to them by the letter, the photo can become too repetitive, mechanical & rigid. Probably here is where the tenet, "breaking the rules came into being", misunderstanding that they were not rules at all.

Below is a visual example of how rules guides get created and how they work or how they are applied.

1. On the first row we can see the same image repeated.
2. On the second row, we add lips and a bow that is slightly changing in shape & distance from the initial graphic.
Here we can see that the simple adjustment changes the age of the face.

3. Using a guideline for comparison, the changes are more visible.
4. We now finish with some details to support our intent to show age.
-3a mouth is adjusted. Made a little bit smaller in 4A.
-4c & 4d actually have the exact same hair but they still look a different age.

From this sample we can invent some rules for ourselves, should we want to draw the same person in different ages. We can do that by understanding what changes. Like the proportion of the face changes with age. We can say the rule of age is that the face becomes longer and more oval with time . Also in observing that a rounder face looks younger, we can use that as (one of the) creative technique if we are designing a character, thereby using the rule as guide to plan ahead a composition.

Simply put, composition in photography, is the relationship, appearance and the unifying effect of all the elements in a photo.

And the rules of composition are just guides for arranging the elements to fit a predetermined output. One must not strive to know the rules but rather to understand it. Why such arrangement works and hence know by heart what it does, thus becoming creative to how far one can play with or break it.
With so many rules binding us, more rules to photo... (show quote)


The rules of photographic composition are mostly based on the rules of oil painting, acrylic and such. These and the math behind many of them far predate photography. Know the rules but don't be consumed by them.

Reply
 
 
Jun 8, 2021 08:12:37   #
Wallen
 
lamiaceae wrote:
The rules of photographic composition are mostly based on the rules of oil painting, acrylic and such. These and the math behind many of them far predate photography. Know the rules but don't be consumed by them.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z4rZz38g4qA

Reply
Jun 8, 2021 08:14:58   #
Longshadow Loc: Audubon, PA, United States
 
lamiaceae wrote:
... Know the rules but don't be consumed by them.

What a concept!

Reply
Jun 8, 2021 09:03:19   #
BebuLamar
 
Longshadow wrote:
What a concept!


In my mind I think "Rules are made to be broken" but people keep telling me "I will suffer serious consequences if I break the rules".

Reply
Jun 8, 2021 09:11:02   #
CHG_CANON Loc: the Windy City
 
If you think you're good enough to break the rules, you're probably not.

Reply
 
 
Jun 8, 2021 09:25:32   #
BebuLamar
 
CHG_CANON wrote:
If you think you're good enough to break the rules, you're probably not.


So I broke the rules but just don't let anyone know.

Reply
Jun 8, 2021 09:25:52   #
Longshadow Loc: Audubon, PA, United States
 
BebuLamar wrote:
In my mind I think "Rules are made to be broken" but people keep telling me "I will suffer serious consequences if I break the rules".

Like vehicular rules?

Reply
Jun 8, 2021 09:26:39   #
Longshadow Loc: Audubon, PA, United States
 
BebuLamar wrote:
So I broke the rules but just don't let anyone know.

Your secret's safe with me.

Reply
Jun 9, 2021 07:02:34   #
ecobin Loc: Paoli, PA
 
The "rules" help one think about what's more pleasing to our eyes. I recommend reading about the "rules" with good examples. Then when shooting you needn't recall any rules as you will automatically know how to adjust for that look or to avoid a look that doesn't work. It's all experience but reading helps - reading continuously helps more.

Reply
 
 
Jun 9, 2021 07:04:36   #
billnikon Loc: Pennsylvania/Ohio/Florida/Maui/Oregon/Vermont
 
Wallen wrote:
With so many rules binding us, more rules to photography, specifically about composition seems to be an unwelcome guest.

Truth is, calling them rules is a misnomer. They are actually guides.
To give an example, Symmetry is opposite the Rule of Thirds. If they are both rules, one of them will be wrong.
These rules come about from studies & observation of what creates a desired effect and why they do.
I for example has my own rules -The Rule of Shadows, Make a Hero & Shoot to Purpose. This came from my experience in animation, graphic design & advertising.

Why have rules? They are invaluable tools in understanding and therefore repeating or aiming for a specific outcome. They are also good for sharing the "technique" so others understand and can repeat a desired effect.

It is true that just relying on one's own "eye" can create a good image. But knowing the rules allows one to be more consistent. It also allows for planning ahead and shooting for a purpose, not just for aesthetics and relying on luck.

Repetitive use makes it second nature will not not slow down action nor the creativity. They can be a fallback when given a challenging circumstance and finally a person's style of photography.

Again they are guides. If someone sticks to them by the letter, the photo can become too repetitive, mechanical & rigid. Probably here is where the tenet, "breaking the rules came into being", misunderstanding that they were not rules at all.

Below is a visual example of how rules guides get created and how they work or how they are applied.

1. On the first row we can see the same image repeated.
2. On the second row, we add lips and a bow that is slightly changing in shape & distance from the initial graphic.
Here we can see that the simple adjustment changes the age of the face.

3. Using a guideline for comparison, the changes are more visible.
4. We now finish with some details to support our intent to show age.
-3a mouth is adjusted. Made a little bit smaller in 4A.
-4c & 4d actually have the exact same hair but they still look a different age.

From this sample we can invent some rules for ourselves, should we want to draw the same person in different ages. We can do that by understanding what changes. Like the proportion of the face changes with age. We can say the rule of age is that the face becomes longer and more oval with time . Also in observing that a rounder face looks younger, we can use that as (one of the) creative technique if we are designing a character, thereby using the rule as guide to plan ahead a composition.

Simply put, composition in photography, is the relationship, appearance and the unifying effect of all the elements in a photo.

And the rules of composition are just guides for arranging the elements to fit a predetermined output. One must not strive to know the rules but rather to understand it. Why such arrangement works and hence know by heart what it does, thus becoming creative to how far one can play with or break it.
With so many rules binding us, more rules to photo... (show quote)


My most important one rule of photography is "Paint with light". I do know the other rules but this one is my main focus (pardon the pun). When I look for the right light, everything else falls in place.
Example below is of an Anhinga with nesting material taken in the first morning rays of light. Your not really supposed to put your main subject in the center of the frame, your supposed to put your subject at one of the four intersecting lines on your rule of thirds, but, as I said, my main point is light. (This image is from my new book, IMAGES III, which should be available toward the end of this year).
Good luck and keep on shooting until the end.



Reply
Jun 9, 2021 07:18:25   #
jerryc41 Loc: Catskill Mts of NY
 

Reply
Jun 9, 2021 07:30:56   #
DirtFarmer Loc: Way too close to New York City
 
CHG_CANON wrote:
If you think you're good enough to break the rules, you're probably not.


I know I’m not good enough so I can break them with impunity.

Reply
Jun 9, 2021 07:55:36   #
Bill_de Loc: US
 
The very first rule I learned was to make sure there is film in the camera. Beyond that I was exposed to a lot of suggestions.

---

Reply
Page 1 of 7 next> last>>
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
Main Photography Discussion
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2021 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.