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Learning camera settings
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Jun 7, 2021 15:26:22   #
Erp1938
 
After 3yrs of reading books looking at videos and shooting with my camera I am having a brain block about camera setting, It just doesn't sink in, I'm so frustrated.

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Jun 7, 2021 15:29:27   #
BebuLamar
 
Erp1938 wrote:
After 3yrs of reading books looking at videos and shooting with my camera I am having a brain block about camera setting, It just doesn't sink in, I'm so frustrated.


Can you elaborate your situation? Which books did you read? Which camera you have? What kind of settings are you talking about?

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Jun 7, 2021 15:43:21   #
boberic Loc: Quiet Corner, Connecticut. Ex long Islander
 
Pick one (doesn't matter which)) and work with it for your next shoot. See how it works for you. Then pick another for yoy next. Work your way through all the settinsgs. Sooner or later you will find out the best ones for your kind of shooting. Sorta like playing all 18 holes with just 1 club. Sooner or later you will see what it can do. Actually a good excersize

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Jun 7, 2021 15:51:50   #
donrent Loc: Punta Gorda , Fl
 
Uh, try the auto section of your camera sections.

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Jun 7, 2021 15:56:04   #
Erp1938
 
Nikon D5600 with a Tamron 18mm-400mm Lens for Wildlife pictures
Nikon D5600 for Dummies
National Geographic Complete Photography

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Jun 7, 2021 15:56:46   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
Are you sure you aren't making it more complicated than it really is? It's all rather simple, as far as exposure goes. The ISO indicates the sensitivity to light. The aperture controls how much light is passed through the lens, and shutter speed is how long the light is let through. It's just that simple.
--Bob
Erp1938 wrote:
After 3yrs of reading books looking at videos and shooting with my camera I am having a brain block about camera setting, It just doesn't sink in, I'm so frustrated.

Reply
Jun 7, 2021 15:58:28   #
Erp1938
 
Thanks may be trying to much at one time.

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Jun 7, 2021 15:58:48   #
BebuLamar
 
rmalarz wrote:
Are you sure you aren't making it more complicated than it really is? It's all rather simple, as far as exposure goes. The ISO indicates the sensitivity to light. The aperture controls how much light is passed through the lens, and shutter speed is how long the light is let through. It's just that simple.
--Bob


And you have to focus on the part of the subject you want to be the sharpest.

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Jun 7, 2021 16:01:03   #
BebuLamar
 
Erp1938 wrote:
Nikon D5600 with a Tamron 18mm-400mm Lens for Wildlife pictures
Nikon D5600 for Dummies
National Geographic Complete Photography


I see your interest is in wildlife. Perhaps you should start with subjects that don't move and allow you to get close and use lenses no longer than 50mm.

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Jun 7, 2021 16:03:53   #
quixdraw Loc: American Free States -- Montana
 
After 3 years of frustration and reading, apparently without success, two possible suggestions. Take an in person class or take advantage of the numerous automated features of your camera and just have fun. Every Nikon Manual I have seen has a Basic Settings or Quick Start section. A place to begin.

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Jun 7, 2021 16:06:36   #
CHG_CANON Loc: the Windy City
 
Using one or several specific examples, we can cut through the guess-game and speak to specific issues. Just take an unedited JPEG and attach and store the file attachment. Explain your issue(s) with the image and let people give actionable ideas of how to address that issue specifically with your D5600 camera, free ideas and consulting.



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Jun 7, 2021 16:19:50   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
That is a fairly common issue when people are learning photographic techniques. It's best to break it down to the basic parts and understand each part. This occurs with photo processing software, as well. People try to do too much in too short a period of time. It's best to master the parts and then put the parts together.
--Bob
Erp1938 wrote:
Thanks may be trying to much at one time.

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Jun 7, 2021 16:43:44   #
CO
 
Do a search online for photography meetup groups and camera clubs in your area. Meetup.com is very popular now. A lot of people use that to form groups. There will be people who can help you.

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Jun 7, 2021 17:47:47   #
Cany143 Loc: SE Utah
 
In mentioning your frustration with 'camera setting[s],' we're left to assume that the 'setting[s]' that are frustrating you have either to do with getting a 'correct' exposure, or are with either one or more of the camera settings that can be accessed using various of your camera's buttons or through the Menu choices your camera allows. One or the other. Or maybe both. Can you explain what the problem might be a little more precisely?

Not everyone is mechanically minded. These days, not everyone is computer minded either, and for all intents and purposes, a camera now is essentially a specialized sort of computer that records whatever it may be pointed at. I'll bet you're a spectacular bread maker, or you're an incredible gardener (holy cow, ERP, those roses you've genetically modified are to die for!), or you're the sort of person I'd want at my side while I'm dying, despite the fact(...?) that 1/125th of a second at f/11 with an ISO of 100 might go completely over your head. Its okay, y'know?

I find it weird to say this, but if you can figure out how to do so (it shouldn't be too difficult), put your camera (and lens, if need be) in A (automatic) mode and after you've pointed it in the direction you want it pointed, press the shutter button and let the camera do its thing. Before long you'll see that under certain conditions (it was kinda dark or it was daytime bright, etc) your pictures will be either too dark or too light, or maybe they're blurry or maybe they're just right, and if you pay attention to those that aren't 'just right,' you'll probably recognize that your bread wasn't baked long enough, or that your roses needed more water, or that you ushered me off to Hell unintentionally.

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Jun 7, 2021 18:25:55   #
martinfisherphoto Loc: Lake Placid Florida
 
Erp1938 wrote:
After 3yrs of reading books looking at videos and shooting with my camera I am having a brain block about camera setting, It just doesn't sink in, I'm so frustrated.


Trying to remember everything you read and then apply in the field is beyond frustrating. I remember my first couple of years. I went to the library and checked out every book I could on the subject. In the end I was more confused then when I started.. I was like everyone had a different opinion. How do you apply Opinions???

I then discovered the book, 'Understand Exposure' 3rd edition by Bryan Peterson. It's all about the exposure triangle and how it is applied to photography. Very, Very simple read with a handful of exercises that will Totally remove the mysteries of capturing a photograph. With this Core Knowledge no type of photography will be out of your grasp... No more guessing, trying to remember page after page of text. Learn the core basics of the camera (Exposure Triangle) and photography will become fun once again. You can find the book used on ebay for about $10.
I've posted at least a thousand photos on this site. If you like what you see get the book, that's where it all starts for me.....

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