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Intertek Hard Drive
Jun 6, 2021 16:31:12   #
wjones8637 Loc: Burleson, TX
 
We recently upgraded our security system and the hard drive for storing our videos is no longer compatible. I am trying to format it to use with my 2012 Macbook Pro running Catalina. It appears to power up ok, but when the activity light goes from a slowly pulsing pale blue to a flashing red. My mbp gives a message that the cable is connected and it needs an ip address. I contacted the security company and it took three days for them to confirm it wasn't caopatible with the new system and after over a week they cannot tell me how to format it.There is an usb port with an odd cable end. While out tomorrow I'll try to find the usb cable. Until then, does anyone have any ideas? Right now it is sitting next to me making noises like the drive is trying to initialize.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions.
Bill

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Jun 6, 2021 19:49:36   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
I’ve read your post severL times and I’m still not clear as to the setup. Was the HD in question previously directly attached to your old security system, and if so, was it USB connected, or was it a Network drive with an Ethernet connection? So does your new security system have a HD? And does your new system need an external drive, and does it need a computer for administration? I’m not getting how the MPB is related to the security system. If the security system needs an external HD for storage, what is the connection. Please clarify, and we’ll try to assist.

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Jun 6, 2021 20:46:10   #
wjones8637 Loc: Burleson, TX
 
TriX wrote:
I’ve read your post severL times and I’m still not clear as to the setup. Was the HD in question previously directly attached to your old security system, and if so, was it USB connected, or was it a Network drive with an Ethernet connection? So does your new security system have a HD? And does your new system need an external drive, and does it need a computer for administration? I’m not getting how the MPB is related to the security system. If the security system needs an external HD for storage, what is the connection. Please clarify, and we’ll try to assist.
I’ve read your post severL times and I’m still not... (show quote)


Thank you TriX,

Often my mind assumes others can fully read it.

First, it was connected directly to our old system through ethernet

Second, the new control station has a 4T ssd in it and doesn't need external storage (at least according to the security company).

Lastly, since the HD is no longer needed nor compatible with the new control box, I want to repurpose it for external storage on my mbp and will have no relationship with the security system. I just cannot get it to connect to the mbp so I can reformat it.

Thanks again,
BIll

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Jun 6, 2021 22:02:35   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
wjones8637 wrote:
Thank you TriX,

Often my mind assumes others can fully read it.

First, it was connected directly to our old system through ethernet

Second, the new control station has a 4T ssd in it and doesn't need external storage (at least according to the security company).

Lastly, since the HD is no longer needed nor compatible with the new control box, I want to repurpose it for external storage on my mbp and will have no relationship with the security system. I just cannot get it to connect to the mbp so I can reformat it.

Thanks again,
BIll
Thank you TriX, br br Often my mind assumes other... (show quote)


Ah, now I understand, and I think I can help although I’m not a Mac guru. Does your home Network have a router and if so, does it have an open Ethernet port? If so plug the HD into the router with a standard Ethernet cable and then try to mount it from the Mac. Unless there’s SW to enable the Mac to be a DHCP server (Mac gurus jump in here), you can’t directly hook an IP client (which the HD is) directly to another client (the Mac) without a router or switch with a DHCP server in between.

By way of explanation, there are two potential issues. First, the transmit and receive lines need to be “crossed” - the TX line of one needs to be attached to the RX line of the other and vice versa. You can do this with an Ethernet crossover cable, but a router automatically performs this. The second issue is the Mac seems to be looking for the device’s IP address from your explanation. It’s possible that you may be able to set up the HD with a fixed IP address, but it sounds as if it typically requests one from the old security system and since the Mac isn’t a DHCP server, it can’t supply one. A router (or switch) solves both these issues - it routes the TX and RX lines appropriately, and it will assign an IP address to the HD when it requests one, and then the Mac should be able to connect to the device like any other NAS device.

Finally, the HD may not be formatted with a file system that the Mac can read and write to, but if you can connect to the device, you should be able to format it directly. BTW, HDs that are designed for video recording are not typically very fast as they’re optimized for size and continuous writes, not speed.

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Jun 7, 2021 05:29:01   #
chrissybabe Loc: New Zealand
 
TriX wrote:
You can do this with an Ethernet crossover cable, but a router automatically performs this. The second issue is the Mac seems to be looking for the device’s IP address from your explanation. It’s possible that you may be able to set up the HD with a fixed IP address, but it sounds as if it typically requests one from the old security system and since the Mac isn’t a DHCP server, it can’t supply one. A router (or switch) solves both these issues - it routes the TX and RX lines appropriately, and it will assign an IP address to the HD when it requests one, and then the Mac should be able to connect to the device like any other NAS device.
You can do this with an Ethernet crossover cable, ... (show quote)


Routers do, sorta, perform this operation BUT since almost forever both sides of all ethernet devices automatically swap transmit and receive pairs. You might have to go back 10-15 years to find occasions where you would need a swap-over cable.
Secondly if your hard drives ethernet port is set up for DHCP then it should work if you plug it into your network maybe at your router. If your hard drive has a hardware IP set then the problem just got complicated because it will never work. Your best bet here is to acquire a copy of the drives manual (it is called the internet) and find out how to reset the drives IP address
Without knowing the drive details you may find that it will default to DHCP and will work again.
A discussion of DHCP and IP address's and how to use and access is beyond this forum.

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Jun 7, 2021 09:12:53   #
Brian S. Loc: Oak Park, MI
 
wjones8637 wrote:
We recently upgraded our security system and the hard drive for storing our videos is no longer compatible. I am trying to format it to use with my 2012 Macbook Pro running Catalina. It appears to power up ok, but when the activity light goes from a slowly pulsing pale blue to a flashing red. My mbp gives a message that the cable is connected and it needs an ip address. I contacted the security company and it took three days for them to confirm it wasn't caopatible with the new system and after over a week they cannot tell me how to format it.There is an usb port with an odd cable end. While out tomorrow I'll try to find the usb cable. Until then, does anyone have any ideas? Right now it is sitting next to me making noises like the drive is trying to initialize.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions.
Bill
We recently upgraded our security system and the h... (show quote)


Bill,

How OLD is the drive in question? If it has been connected to your security system then for ALL of those YEARS it has been running full time. The best thing to do would be to purchase a new drive which will probably last much longer.

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Jun 7, 2021 09:20:51   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
chrissybabe wrote:
Routers do, sorta, perform this operation BUT since almost forever both sides of all ethernet devices automatically swap transmit and receive pairs. You might have to go back 10-15 years to find occasions where you would need a swap-over cable...


Yep, all modern NICs (at least the ones I’ve encountered) auto detect, but since his Mac was a 2012 (and I’m not that familiar with Mac HW which tends to be a little “behind” mainstream on technology), wasn’t sure.

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Jun 7, 2021 14:24:57   #
BobU Loc: Sarasota Florida
 
A picture of this drive would be helpful.

Was this drive a stand alone external drive to a video security system main unit, or is this the security system recorder itself?

If it is a stand alone drive and has a usb connection, the a usb connection to the Mac may be the easiest way to get access to the drive as it bypasses the ethernet issues. Some security systems encrypt the video data on the drive, or may use a format that is not readable by a mac.

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Jun 7, 2021 15:11:12   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
BobU wrote:
A picture of this drive would be helpful.

Was this drive a stand alone external drive to a video security system main unit, or is this the security system recorder itself?

If it is a stand alone drive and has a usb connection, the a usb connection to the Mac may be the easiest way to get access to the drive as it bypasses the ethernet issues. Some security systems encrypt the video data on the drive, or may use a format that is not readable by a mac.


Did you read the OP’s response that it was Ethernet connected?

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Jun 7, 2021 19:52:46   #
BobU Loc: Sarasota Florida
 
TriX wrote:
Did you read the OP’s response that it was Ethernet connected?


Yes, I did read it, and he mentioned the drive also has a usb port. That is why a picture of the drive would be helpful to determine exactly what it is. If it is a portable drive with both ethernet and usb, the usb would bypass the IP address problems.

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Jun 7, 2021 20:17:21   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
BobU wrote:
Yes, I did read it, and he mentioned the drive also has a usb port. That is why a picture of the drive would be helpful to determine exactly what it is. If it is a portable drive with both ethernet and usb, the usb would bypass the IP address problems.


Fair enough - worth a try. Lacking an image maybe a model number? I have Googled Intertek several times, and I don’t see an Intertek drive company and have never heard of them after 25 years of selling and designing storage. Perhaps the OP meant Inatek which makes external HD cases?

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Jun 7, 2021 22:00:59   #
wjones8637 Loc: Burleson, TX
 
Thanks to everyone that has offered suggestions, but I am still stumped. I tried connecting directly to the computer by ethernet without success.

Yes, the drive is about 4-5 years old and I want to attach it for the experience if nothing else.

The drive is Intertek, I have attached a photo of the label and I have also been unsuccessful finding a manual. One site showed promise but asked for credit information before displaying the document.

I am still looking for the usb cable, the combination of connectors is a little strange.

Again, thank you for the suggestions.

Bill


(Download)

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Jun 7, 2021 22:22:54   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
wjones8637 wrote:
Thanks to everyone that has offered suggestions, but I am still stumped. I tried connecting directly to the computer by ethernet without success.

Yes, the drive is about 4-5 years old and I want to attach it for the experience if nothing else.

The drive is Intertek, I have attached a photo of the label and I have also been unsuccessful finding a manual. One site showed promise but asked for credit information before displaying the document.

I am still looking for the usb cable, the combination of connectors is a little strange.

Again, thank you for the suggestions.

Bill
Thanks to everyone that has offered suggestions, b... (show quote)


Intertek is a testing service that performs electrical, performance and EMR testing and certification for computer peripherals, and since the Intertek logo is located among the other certifications, I suspect that’s what it refers to instead of being the manufacturer.

The model number is key. It turns out it’s a Vivint SM2-2w10 Smart Drive and here’s a link to the installation Manual:https://support.vivint.com/s/article/Smart-Drive-Installation-Guide

And as I suggested initially, it’s designed to be Ethernet connected to your router.

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Jun 7, 2021 23:46:47   #
chrissybabe Loc: New Zealand
 
I suspect that the model number is a false positive. The vivint doesn't look like the picture of the base of yours plus I am not sure just how the original would actually have been used by any half way decent surveillance system. I also tried the model number and got vivint. I think that trying to gain access via usb might be your best bet initially (if you can get in that way and the drive is stuffed/too small/not suitable then not worth pursuing further. Now as a photographer a better photograph of the connections should be possible to help identify the usb plugs.

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Jun 8, 2021 00:03:38   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
chrissybabe wrote:
I suspect that the model number is a false positive. The vivint doesn't look like the picture of the base of yours plus I am not sure just how the original would actually have been used by any half way decent surveillance system. I also tried the model number and got vivint. I think that trying to gain access via usb might be your best bet initially (if you can get in that way and the drive is stuffed/too small/not suitable then not worth pursuing further. Now as a photographer a better photograph of the connections should be possible to help identify the usb plugs.
I suspect that the model number is a false positiv... (show quote)


The reason it doesn’t look like the image in the manual is because the image the OP posted is looking into the bottom of the drive where the sticker is and the “manual” just shows a back view. Vivent makes surveillance systems, so this HD is just part of their system. It’s just too coincidental that exact model number refers to a HD with an Ethernet port that’s used on a surveillance system and that’s the origin of this drive. If you read the short manual, they mention plugging it into your router for playback of the recorded video from the surveillance system. What isn’t clear is if they wrote to the HD via the same port or wrote via USB and read via Ethernet. What we REALLY need is the manufacturer/model number of the previous surveillance system.

Either way, video drives for surveillance systems are not fast, they’re writing constantly (the head is constantly being moved 24x7), and this one has been in service for awhile, so not a good candidate for external storage on a computer used for post processing in my opinion if you care about your data. I understand it’s free (and a challenge), but if you want reliable and relatively fast external storage, buy an HGST UltraStar and mount it in a fan cooled external case or buy a USB connected SSD if you don’t need huge capacity.

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