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Why the bum rap?
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Apr 8, 2021 07:14:30   #
Jimmy T Loc: Quicksburg, Virginia
 
jradose wrote:
I often research camera gear, just to see what is new and exciting. I own the Nikon D7500, as well as the D600, and have taken many wonderful photos with them. However, many "camera gear experts" really bad mouth the D7500, mainly because it has just one card slot. Really? So, I am wondering, does the average hobbyist photographer really need two card slots on their camera? I have been shooting for more than 15 years now, have gone out on all-day long photo shoots, and have never filled up one card, and yes, I usually shoot in raw. Plus, I have never had a card failure where I lost the photos on my card, perhaps I am very lucky. So, weigh in please with your opinion.
I often research camera gear, just to see what is ... (show quote)


I have Canon cameras with both one and two card slots.
I learned years ago that name brand (I prefer SanDisk) perform and last.
Bargain and off-brand cards eventually fail. Sometimes electronically and sometimes physically.
So, the off-brand cards that remain from the past go in picture frames and are discarded at the first sign of any trouble.
I use SanDisk cards rated at or above the transfer speed Canon recommends so that should the occasion arise they may
be used for future generations of (Canon) cameras. I also like larger cards because I still have 2 and 4 GB cards left over
from the past when they were considered large.
Smile,
JimmyT Sends

Apr 8, 2021 08:33:23   #
olemikey Loc: 6 mile creek, Spacecoast Florida
 
jradose wrote:
I often research camera gear, just to see what is new and exciting. I own the Nikon D7500, as well as the D600, and have taken many wonderful photos with them. However, many "camera gear experts" really bad mouth the D7500, mainly because it has just one card slot. Really? So, I am wondering, does the average hobbyist photographer really need two card slots on their camera? I have been shooting for more than 15 years now, have gone out on all-day long photo shoots, and have never filled up one card, and yes, I usually shoot in raw. Plus, I have never had a card failure where I lost the photos on my card, perhaps I am very lucky. So, weigh in please with your opinion.
I often research camera gear, just to see what is ... (show quote)


The 1st position (Primary #1) card slot on my D7100 stopped talking to the card at about 28K clicks - Home remedy, blowouts, several attampts at cleaning & resurecting - never did (I did not send it in to a shop since it has two) and I have other Nikon and Sony bodies. I have used the 2nd slot successfully for the next 10-15K shots.

The only change I've made with all my camera bodies, I now use the micro SD high capacity cards, and the little plastic holder/adapter stays in the slot all the time, and I remove the micro card to download - I figure the wear and tear is on the little plastic micro card holder/adapter, and not the pin/spring and locking mechanism in the camera card slot, as the adapter moves only once in while. If the connection becomes unreliable, easy to install another adapter and continue on.

This is the only "on-board" card reader fail I've had with a number of camera bodies during my digital camera life, no card failures in all years of digital, several failures with the cheap external card readers, but that's it. Don't know what caused the D7100 fail, could not see the issue.

I WOULD NOT BE AFRAID OF A ONE SLOT CAMERA - but I would use the micro card adapter method if I only had one slot, just to add to the longevity...because if it is going to fail, it will probably be long after warranty has expired, and parts may/may not be available.

I guess the need for two is kind of like having a spare tire, it just hangs around till you need it (unless you download to two at the same time) - but then, the factory spare tire/donut is still in my old "go to work" 95 Jeep Cherokee, I have never needed it, the truck is almost 27 yrs. old, the spare still holds air to this day, never pulled off it's cradle.

So, my take on one versus two cards - not a deal breaker, but nice to have....and I would treat it gently!

Apr 8, 2021 09:10:48   #
anotherview Loc: California
 
The so-called experts who write about photography earn their living from this activity. So, they have to come up with an interesting issue to present to individuals who do photography. The two-card versus one card comparison likely serves as a talking-point for general consumption.

But in the field, does it matter enough to sway a checked-out photographer? I doubt it, and for this reason: Seasoned photographers note that when shooting, replacing a card before it becomes filled up protects its contents and avoids putting all eggs in the same basket.

The protection rationale for switching out a card may seem like a remote occurrence, yet I can testify that a card can go bad and stop faithfully storing images. Thankfully, I have learned to carry a spare card just in case.
jradose wrote:
I often research camera gear, just to see what is new and exciting. I own the Nikon D7500, as well as the D600, and have taken many wonderful photos with them. However, many "camera gear experts" really bad mouth the D7500, mainly because it has just one card slot. Really? So, I am wondering, does the average hobbyist photographer really need two card slots on their camera? I have been shooting for more than 15 years now, have gone out on all-day long photo shoots, and have never filled up one card, and yes, I usually shoot in raw. Plus, I have never had a card failure where I lost the photos on my card, perhaps I am very lucky. So, weigh in please with your opinion.
I often research camera gear, just to see what is ... (show quote)

 
 
Apr 8, 2021 09:20:04   #
User ID
 
Imagemine wrote:
you should get a YouTube channel

Viewers might have problems with a Canadian accent, eh ?

Apr 8, 2021 13:06:44   #
amfoto1 Loc: San Jose, Calif. USA
 
jradose wrote:
I often research camera gear, just to see what is new and exciting. I own the Nikon D7500, as well as the D600, and have taken many wonderful photos with them. However, many "camera gear experts" really bad mouth the D7500, mainly because it has just one card slot. Really? So, I am wondering, does the average hobbyist photographer really need two card slots on their camera? I have been shooting for more than 15 years now, have gone out on all-day long photo shoots, and have never filled up one card, and yes, I usually shoot in raw. Plus, I have never had a card failure where I lost the photos on my card, perhaps I am very lucky. So, weigh in please with your opinion.
I often research camera gear, just to see what is ... (show quote)


Yes, some people feel the need for two slots, like the D7200 had and, for some reason, Nikon deleted from the D7500 that replaced it.

The thing is, it's not just the D7500's single memory card slot...

D7200 was 24MP while the D7500 is 21MP. This was probably done so that the D7500 could accommodate 4K video, where the D7200 was limited to HD.

DXO also rates the D7200 to have slightly higher color depth and about 1/2 stop more dynamic range. On the other hand, probably thanks to the reduced resolution, the D7500 has slightly higher ISO usability rating and one stop higher selectable setting (though it's probably higher than you'd ever want to use).

The D7500 uses the same battery as the D7200, but is rated to get around 15% fewer shots with it. Something closely related to this that might be of concern to some shooters, for some reason Nikon also deleted the D7500's compatibility with a battery grip and doesn't offer one for use with it. The previous D7100 and D7200 models can optionally be fitted with MB-D15 grip to double battery capacity at the same time it provides a vertical grip and secondary controls, whichare quite useful when shooting in portrait orientation. Yes, there's a very inexpensive third party grip from Vello for the D7500... but it DOES NOT allow a 2nd battery to be used and it lacks most of the controls. It only provides a shutter release button and that has to be connected using a funky external wire to the remote release socket. Likely Nikon deleted the D7500's compatibility with the MB-D15 as a cost saving measure and so that it wouldn't compete too closely with their own more expensive D500 model (which does have capacity for a Nikon-made grip with full controls and 2nd battery). While these things may not matter to a lot of users, I can't help but wonder if it's cost Nikon some potential customers for the D7500.

Some of the exterior panels that were magnesium on the D7200 are reinforced plastic on the D7500. This reduces the newer camera's weight a little and doesn't seem to effect the feel of the camera or change weather resistance.

In spite of the above, there are some definite upgrades in the D7500 too...

It offers 8 frames per second continuous shooting versus the D7200's 6 fps.(But, for some shooters this increases the need for a battery grip and increased battery capacity.)

D7500 has Nikon's Anti-Flicker, which is very useful shooting under fluorescent and similar types of lighting. D7200 didn't have that feature.

While both D7200 and D7500 use a very similar, excellent 51-point AF system, the D7500's got a few new tricks such as additional, user selectable AF point groupings. D7500 also got a chip upgrade and has a more advanced AF fine tuning feature. The touchscreen of the D7500 also can be used for AF point selection and even to trip the shutter, when using in Live View.

The D7500 got an articulated (tilt) rear LCD touchscreen, which the D7200 lacked. However, on D7500 that screen is a bit lower resolution than the fixed screen in the D7200. It's not enough difference in resolution to be noticeable most of the time, though.

Apr 8, 2021 15:15:36   #
al lehman Loc: San jose, ca.
 
If you have a single slot and it fails, you are done. I shoot in remote areas at times, such as Africa, and having two card slots just makes life a bit easier when in the field. At minimum I have a back up storage source. Many DLSR's today have the capability to shoot video in addition to still imagery. You can fill up a card quickly if you shoot video, especially if you are shooting in a raw format. I have a Canon C200B video camera and it has three card slots.

Apr 8, 2021 17:11:35   #
yssirk123 Loc: New Jersey
 
My daughter runs her own wedding studio, and was very interested in the Z6 when it was introduced.......but the single card slot made it a no-go. Fortunately Nikon fixed that with the Z6II which she happily purchased and is now using.

 
 
Apr 8, 2021 22:12:51   #
Francisco Fernandez
 
Yes! Carry that second camera all the time, but don’t use it! Remember it’s just in case your first camera breaks.

Apr 9, 2021 06:24:11   #
AGO
 
I haven't used the spare tire on my car in over 5 years so I guess I'll get rid of it. I also haven't made a claim on my house insurance since I've lived here, so I guess I can get rid of that as well. And, I haven't had a hard drive failure on my computer so I think I'll also get rid of my back up system.

The bottom line, that most people seem to be missing, is that the second card can be used as a back up. I find that invaluable. For those of you who don't see the utility of that, I hope you don't find out the hard way that it is useful.

Apr 9, 2021 09:22:45   #
anotherview Loc: California
 
Using the second card as a backup of shots does justify this additional card. Yet, the camera-makers have produced millions of cameras without the second card slot. We may presume that the camera-makers tested the the single-slot approach to image storage and found the failure rate of it as miniscule, and thus not supporting the need of a second slot.

In my years of shooting, I've had only two card failures. One failure I believe had more to do with a camera software glitch. The second failure resulted from a card contact delaminating from the card body.
AGO wrote:
I haven't used the spare tire on my car in over 5 years so I guess I'll get rid of it. I also haven't made a claim on my house insurance since I've lived here, so I guess I can get rid of that as well. And, I haven't had a hard drive failure on my computer so I think I'll also get rid of my back up system.

The bottom line, that most people seem to be missing, is that the second card can be used as a back up. I find that invaluable. For those of you who don't see the utility of that, I hope you don't find out the hard way that it is useful.
I haven't used the spare tire on my car in over 5 ... (show quote)

Apr 9, 2021 09:53:59   #
burkphoto Loc: High Point, NC
 
anotherview wrote:
Using the second card as a backup of shots does justify this additional card. Yet, the camera-makers have produced millions of cameras without the second card slot. We may presume that the camera-makers tested the the single-slot approach to image storage and found the failure rate of it as miniscule, and thus not supporting the need of a second slot.

In my years of shooting, I've had only two card failures. One failure I believe had more to do with a camera software glitch. The second failure resulted from a card contact delaminating from the card body.
Using the second card as a backup of shots does ju... (show quote)


Wedding and other special event photographers rest a bit easier with two slots. Of course, the probability that they'll drop a full SD card in someone's drink (or down a street sewer) while swapping it is arguably greater than losing a card slot's function...

No, the utility of a spare slot extends far beyond backup. I detailed a few scenarios a few pages back. I will welcome the presence of two slots in my next camera.

 
 
Apr 9, 2021 21:57:30   #
Basil Loc: Gone
 
rmalarz wrote:
I've never understood the one slot paranoia either. My film cameras only have one roll of film. One's all one needs.
--Bob


My 6D has one slot and that has never been an issue. My 5D4 has two slots but I usually only write to the CF card (in rare instances I will write to the SD if teh CF gets full). Ditto the 7DII. I could see a single slot being a concern for a professional whose livlihood relies on their gear, but for an amature like me, meh...

Apr 18, 2021 21:08:43   #
Nicholas J DeSciose
 
Your wife,{Girlfriend} only has one slot! What more do you need?

Apr 18, 2021 23:34:05   #
anotherview Loc: California
 
Ditto.
Basil wrote:
My 6D has one slot and that has never been an issue. My 5D4 has two slots but I usually only write to the CF card (in rare instances I will write to the SD if teh CF gets full). Ditto the 7DII. I could see a single slot being a concern for a professional whose livlihood relies on their gear, but for an amature like me, meh...

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