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Camera News, 35mm camera outsells digital cameras
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Apr 1, 2021 17:23:20   #
Apr 1, 2021 17:44:39   #
CWGordon
 
Architect: I sorta get it. While having 2 d850’s and a plethora of lenses, my very recent purchases are a pentax 6X7 and a nikon rs af. The pentax and associated lenses should give a different look to things I like to shoot and enlarge large. The nikon underwater cameras are fun to play with and I always just wanted the rs af. The only problem, of course, is the weight cost incurred in travel to Mexico and the Caribbean where the clear water of many locales make the performance of such cameras worth their inconvenience. It seems many other photographers are similarly looking to try new/old techniques to see what different looks do for their work. Times are perfect for this mini-revival. The Pandemic keeping many from travel and restaurants has provided the extra income for the purchase of such extras and the experimentation that come with these cameras. Secondly, because so little travel has been taking place, those who have been photographing familiar sites repeatedly may be open to trying new/old techniques and a way to keep their images fresh and with a bit of a different look. Hauling around older stuff can be fun when you have the time to do so. One knows they can go back and try again if they make mistakes regarding exposure.
Going back to basics can be fun and educational, reminding us of what it was about back in the day. I have plenty of old to really old cameras. I use them when planning for a leisurely day in the field. When going somewhere new I usually take my digital. Less chance I will make a mistake when going somewhere I might not get to go to again, or at least anytime soon.
I don’t know if others are considering things the way I am. However, it seems like a possibility. Interesting issue. Thanks for pointing it out.

Apr 1, 2021 17:56:30   #
Architect1776 Loc: In my mind
 
CWGordon wrote:
Architect: I sorta get it. While having 2 d850’s and a plethora of lenses, my very recent purchases are a pentax 6X7 and a nikon rs af. The pentax and associated lenses should give a different look to things I like to shoot and enlarge large. The nikon underwater cameras are fun to play with and I always just wanted the rs af. The only problem, of course, is the weight cost incurred in travel to Mexico and the Caribbean where the clear water of many locales make the performance of such cameras worth their inconvenience. It seems many other photographers are similarly looking to try new/old techniques to see what different looks do for their work. Times are perfect for this mini-revival. The Pandemic keeping many from travel and restaurants has provided the extra income for the purchase of such extras and the experimentation that come with these cameras. Secondly, because so little travel has been taking place, those who have been photographing familiar sites repeatedly may be open to trying new/old techniques and a way to keep their images fresh and with a bit of a different look. Hauling around older stuff can be fun when you have the time to do so. One knows they can go back and try again if they make mistakes regarding exposure.
Going back to basics can be fun and educational, reminding us of what it was about back in the day. I have plenty of old to really old cameras. I use them when planning for a leisurely day in the field. When going somewhere new I usually take my digital. Less chance I will make a mistake when going somewhere I might not get to go to again, or at least anytime soon.
I don’t know if others are considering things the way I am. However, it seems like a possibility. Interesting issue. Thanks for pointing it out.
Architect: I sorta get it. While having 2 d850’s ... (show quote)


It just really was an interesting thing.

 
 
Apr 1, 2021 21:22:02   #
JohnSwanda Loc: San Francisco
 
It shouldn't be a surprise that they sell lots of those cheap singe use film cameras. Some people buy them in quantity for wedding guests to use.

Apr 2, 2021 08:02:01   #
whfowle Loc: Tampa first, now Albuquerque
 
Is film making a comeback? Maybe! We are seeing new film coming on the market or returning. The price of old film cameras is going through the roof. For me, the last four purchases are related to film: Mamiya 645 system, Nikon F2AS, and two Voigtlander f mount lenses. Professionally, I don't think so because of the demands of the customer for speed and the ease of getting the product to the customer. But for hobbyists like me, or professionals just making personal photos, the trend is to go back to film or in the case of younger photographers, to experiment. I've been doing the hybrid thing too. With various adapters, I've been using old MF lenses on my digital bodies. Since I don't care too much about AF capabilities, the slower process doesn't bother me.

Apr 2, 2021 08:32:12   #
wmurnahan Loc: Bloomington IN
 
Those disposable film cameras are popular at weddings and events. People are buying large numbers with each purchase, not really a statement on film vs digital.

Apr 2, 2021 10:28:02   #
zug55 Loc: Austin, Texas
 
Amazon mostly serves the entry-level market so this is not necessarily representative. Pros and enthusiasts buy at local camera stores or at B&H and Adorama. There are too many fakes and grey market items being peddled on the Amazon site.

 
 
Apr 2, 2021 11:18:21   #
bwana Loc: Bergen, Alberta, Canada
 
Architect1776 wrote:
Amazon sales of cameras by volume.
Quite a surprise.
35mm film camera took first place.

https://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-Electronics-Digital-Cameras/zgbs/electronics/281052/ref=zg_bs_pg_1?_encoding=UTF8&pg=1

I guess Kodak is still alive and well with the Kodak FunSaver 35mm Single Use Camera...

bwa

Apr 2, 2021 13:36:10   #
CWGordon
 
I think weddings do use a lot of the disposable cameras. More than I was even aware of until I actually viewed the results and read some of the comments. We who use cameras much more seriously may not be buying those and spend far more for those cameras we do buy. Thus, numbers of cameras sold is somewhat less of an accurate picture than what is being spent. I wonder where those numbers would lead us.
I do see a revival in the purchase of older lenses and mechanical film purchases. While this is a harder market to quantify the increasing prices for such items leaves one with the inescapable conclusion that people are doing more experimenting. The interest in film photography may have something to do with the greater knowledge required to succeed at it. Digital is far more easy and quick. Some years back someone quite smart noted that everyone with a D40 now thinks they are a professional photographer. There was some truth to that. It comes out in every generation of our field. Remember, back when 35mm was big, the purists talked about how Ansel Adams and others took minutes or hours or days to set up the one or two pictures they would take as opposed to SLR guys just “cranking off” a bunch of shots w/o much thought, because it was easy and one of the shots (or more) would work out.
Going back to film and mechanicals is so similar a concept to what the old purists thought. They were in their own way quite correct. We do need to think and pre-visualize more than most of us do. We need to imagine what we want to “say” or convey before we start shooting eleven frames a second. How many times are we disappointed with what we shot? How many times do we get discouraged, put the camera down and don’t shoot for awhile? We say, eh. I am just not that good. I think technical skills are important, but mean nothing compared to thoughtful pre-visualizing and trying to figure out most of why you are attracted to the scene in front of us. Is it the bird or the bird in its’ environment? Is it the eyes or the whole head, body or relation to the bird it is with? What do I want to show to those who will look at what I did today and what will I have shared? Will they wish they had taken in such a subject during their day or will they just say that’s nice and quickly move on to something else more interesting or, at that moment, more important to them? These are the questions and the self reflection I am doing these days. I need to improve this, as do many of us, I presume.
I received a book recently as a gift. Title: WILD ENCOUNTERS, by David Yarrow. Some have criticized some of what he has done, but he is a terrific photographer who really works hard to do those things of which I wrote above. As useful as the photographs are, it is his written narrative that I am finding most useful. He has and does wrestle with those issues we all face. He doesn’t tell you what ISO or fstop he used. He tells a story of what he was trying to do and convey. He writes of his position, height, distance, from his topic. Why and what were his thought processes and goals. Reading this book I find invaluable. It is clear some sacrifice of ease and convenience may, at times, may be the difference between a great image and “meh.” I highly recommend this book to anyone wishing to raise the caliber of their images.

Apr 2, 2021 14:06:45   #
bwana Loc: Bergen, Alberta, Canada
 
CWGordon wrote:
I think weddings do use a lot of the disposable cameras. More than I was even aware of until I actually viewed the results and read some of the comments. We who use cameras much more seriously may not be buying those and spend far more for those cameras we do buy. Thus, numbers of cameras sold is somewhat less of an accurate picture than what is being spent. I wonder where those numbers would lead us.
I do see a revival in the purchase of older lenses and mechanical film purchases. While this is a harder market to quantify the increasing prices for such items leaves one with the inescapable conclusion that people are doing more experimenting. The interest in film photography may have something to do with the greater knowledge required to succeed at it. Digital is far more easy and quick. Some years back someone quite smart noted that everyone with a D40 now thinks they are a professional photographer. There was some truth to that. It comes out in every generation of our field. Remember, back when 35mm was big, the purists talked about how Ansel Adams and others took minutes or hours or days to set up the one or two pictures they would take as opposed to SLR guys just “cranking off” a bunch of shots w/o much thought, because it was easy and one of the shots (or more) would work out.
Going back to film and mechanicals is so similar a concept to what the old purists thought. They were in their own way quite correct. We do need to think and pre-visualize more than most of us do. We need to imagine what we want to “say” or convey before we start shooting eleven frames a second. How many times are we disappointed with what we shot? How many times do we get discouraged, put the camera down and don’t shoot for awhile? We say, eh. I am just not that good. I think technical skills are important, but mean nothing compared to thoughtful pre-visualizing and trying to figure out most of why you are attracted to the scene in front of us. Is it the bird or the bird in its’ environment? Is it the eyes or the whole head, body or relation to the bird it is with? What do I want to show to those who will look at what I did today and what will I have shared? Will they wish they had taken in such a subject during their day or will they just say that’s nice and quickly move on to something else more interesting or, at that moment, more important to them? These are the questions and the self reflection I am doing these days. I need to improve this, as do many of us, I presume.
I received a book recently as a gift. Title: WILD ENCOUNTERS, by David Yarrow. Some have criticized some of what he has done, but he is a terrific photographer who really works hard to do those things of which I wrote above. As useful as the photographs are, it is his written narrative that I am finding most useful. He has and does wrestle with those issues we all face. He doesn’t tell you what ISO or fstop he used. He tells a story of what he was trying to do and convey. He writes of his position, height, distance, from his topic. Why and what were his thought processes and goals. Reading this book I find invaluable. It is clear some sacrifice of ease and convenience may, at times, may be the difference between a great image and “meh.” I highly recommend this book to anyone wishing to raise the caliber of their images.
I think weddings do use a lot of the disposable ca... (show quote)

It is not just film cameras being handed out at events. I was at a recent wedding where each of the guests was offered an inexpensive digital camera with the understanding they would return the memory card before going home; they got to keep the camera. The intent was for the couple to possibly get some good impromptu shots.

bwa

Apr 2, 2021 14:09:33   #
CWGordon
 
bwa: Yes, you are correct. There are also digital “throwaway” cameras now, too. I have in the past kept such items in my auto console. Just in case, you know?

 
 
Apr 2, 2021 15:37:34   #
bwana Loc: Bergen, Alberta, Canada
 
CWGordon wrote:
bwa: Yes, you are correct. There are also digital “throwaway” cameras now, too. I have in the past kept such items in my auto console. Just in case, you know?

There are actually some pretty reasonable throwaway digitals... At least in the sense of having a camera available as opposed to totally missing a shot.

bwa

Apr 2, 2021 17:10:49   #
CWGordon
 
We have so many choices and each year so little space. I enjoy every choice. There seems a purpose for them all.
I am headed out to some islands in the Chesapeake Bay next week. Weather seems promising. The only problem: which lenses, which cameras do I want to take with me? Shoot film or digital? All 1st world problems, I know. Ain’t retirement grand, though?!?

Apr 2, 2021 17:15:00   #
CWGordon
 
By the way, bwana, my mother was born in Alberta. Calgary, as a matter of fact. She grew up mostly in Regina, Saskatchewan, where I lived as a tyke for about 2 years. I love Canada 🍁. She had 4 sisters who lived from Nova Scotia to British Columbia.

Apr 2, 2021 17:59:31   #
bwana Loc: Bergen, Alberta, Canada
 
CWGordon wrote:
By the way, bwana, my mother was born in Alberta. Calgary, as a matter of fact. She grew up mostly in Regina, Saskatchewan, where I lived as a tyke for about 2 years. I love Canada 🍁. She had 4 sisters who lived from Nova Scotia to British Columbia.

I grew up in Saskatchewan and went to the UofS. I worked in Regina for a year before moving to Alberta. 1st to Edmonton, then Ft. McMurray and finally Calgary for 20+years. Retired to a ranch just outside Sundre.

bwa

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