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Cause of Halos around Objects in Post Processing
Mar 14, 2021 17:57:21   #
StanMac Loc: Tennessee
 
I have posted the original image and the processed image below for examination. The issue I'm inquiring about is the halo that surrounds the long uprights at the near end of the dock in the processed image. They are not evident in the SOOC image. I don't see the halos on the other parts of the dock. I do see some chromatic aberration around the roof of the hut at the end of the dock and some of the pilings.

I processed this image some months ago and unfortunately didn't save the .psd file. I was preparing to get this image printed for our camera club exhibition next month and noticed the halos. Don't know why I hadn't seen them earlier. What post processing adjustments can create halos like those on the processed image below?

Thank you in advance for your help and advice.

Stan


(Download)


(Download)

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Mar 14, 2021 18:06:04   #
Fotoartist Loc: Detroit, Michigan
 
It's in both images it's just more pronounced in the second. It's natural digital sharpening. Halos are caused by the sharpening effect: Dark on one side of an edge, light on the other. Clarity, de-haze, contrast, and sharpening all create it. That is how digital images are sharpened, with modified halos. I would just strive to keep the halos to a minimum for sharpening purposes which they are in your case.

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Mar 14, 2021 18:17:27   #
letmedance Loc: Walnut, Ca.
 
StanMac wrote:
I have posted the original image and the processed image below for examination. The issue I'm inquiring about is the halo that surrounds the long uprights at the near end of the dock in the processed image. They are not evident in the SOOC image. I don't see the halos on the other parts of the dock. I do see some chromatic aberration around the roof of the hut at the end of the dock and some of the pilings.

I processed this image some months ago and unfortunately didn't save the .psd file. I was preparing to get this image printed for our camera club exhibition next month and noticed the halos. Don't know why I hadn't seen them earlier. What post processing adjustments can create halos like those on the processed image below?

Thank you in advance for your help and advice.

Stan
I have posted the original image and the processed... (show quote)


If you look closely at the original you can see Chromatic Aberration to the left side of the tall supports in front.

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Mar 14, 2021 18:21:37   #
Ysarex
 
StanMac wrote:
I have posted the original image and the processed image below for examination. The issue I'm inquiring about is the halo that surrounds the long uprights at the near end of the dock in the processed image. They are not evident in the SOOC image. I don't see the halos on the other parts of the dock. I do see some chromatic aberration around the roof of the hut at the end of the dock and some of the pilings.

I processed this image some months ago and unfortunately didn't save the .psd file. I was preparing to get this image printed for our camera club exhibition next month and noticed the halos. Don't know why I hadn't seen them earlier. What post processing adjustments can create halos like those on the processed image below?

Thank you in advance for your help and advice.

Stan
I have posted the original image and the processed... (show quote)


The halos are from an attempt to darken the sky using a mask that kept the darkening process away from the dock and hut. If you take the original and just darken the entire image to an equal level the halos do not appear.

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Mar 14, 2021 19:16:13   #
fredpnm Loc: Corrales, NM
 
StanMac wrote:
I have posted the original image....


What I see in the second image is the need to reduce color noise...and noise. In the second image, there is still some chromatic aberration on the foreground uprights that was easily removed. I did not see much in the way of what most call haloing in the second image. The color noise and noise are most noticeable along the horizon line - sky and water.

In the attached I removed/adjusted for that mentioned above - using PS and Topaz DeNoise AI - so you can see what I'm referring to.


(Download)

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Mar 14, 2021 19:26:07   #
letmedance Loc: Walnut, Ca.
 
I think the exposure is part and parcel to problem. The exposure on the bright horizon is correct but the foreground is a little under.

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Mar 14, 2021 19:44:38   #
Craigdca Loc: Pasadena, California
 
Stan, layers will take care of it. Here’s a masking trick I figured out on Photoshop CS3.
- make two duplicate layers of the photo.
- make one of them Max brightness and contrast to make the outline of the object to be masked as strong as possible.
- use magic wand’s Quick Selection tool around the inside of the object.
- in the Layers sidebar, click the button to create a mask which will reflect your selection
- you can move the mask to the second copy of the image: in the Layers box, click off the link icon between the image and the mask, then drag the mask to the other layer. You now have an excellent mask on the layer that looks normal.
- duplicate this layer to keep a backup layer.
- only this and the original layer should be set to visible
- On the masked layer, use Ctrl-I to inverse the mask if needed and make adjustments to the sky and ocean.
- the good hut and bridge from the original layer should remain unchanged.

I attached the edited version - hopefully you're okay with my doing so!


(Download)

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Mar 15, 2021 08:04:30   #
joehel2 Loc: Cherry Hill, NJ
 
Craigdca wrote:
Stan, layers will take care of it. Here’s a masking trick I figured out on Photoshop CS3.
- make two duplicate layers of the photo.
- make one of them Max brightness and contrast to make the outline of the object to be masked as strong as possible.
- use magic wand’s Quick Selection tool around the inside of the object.
- in the Layers sidebar, click the button to create a mask which will reflect your selection
- you can move the mask to the second copy of the image: in the Layers box, click off the link icon between the image and the mask, then drag the mask to the other layer. You now have an excellent mask on the layer that looks normal.
- duplicate this layer to keep a backup layer.
- only this and the original layer should be set to visible
- On the masked layer, use Ctrl-I to inverse the mask if needed and make adjustments to the sky and ocean.
- the good hut and bridge from the original layer should remain unchanged.

I attached the edited version - hopefully you're okay with my doing so!
Stan, layers will take care of it. Here’s a maskin... (show quote)


👍👍

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Mar 15, 2021 08:56:40   #
R.G. Loc: Scotland
 
Craigdca did a good job of telling you how to get rid of it, but you probably want to know what caused it so that you can avoid it in the future. First off, when you use the term "haloing" you need to be aware that there are two distinct artefacts that the term refers to. One is the thin white line that over-sharpening can give you along edges, the other, which you have, refers to a diffuse halo effect which typically occurs around high contrast edges. I like to avoid confusion by referring to them as tight haloing and diffuse haloing.

The main causes of diffuse haloing are Clarity, Contrast and HDR processing (which includes merging of exposure bracketed shots and also includes HDR processing of a single image using HDR presets and the like).

Some cameras produce files that are prone to haloing and it only takes an increase in contrast to bring it out. With other cameras the SOOC files aren't intrinsically prone to haloing, and in those cases the worst culprit for causing it is the Clarity slider. In either case, once it's there it only takes extra contrast to aggravate it, and HDR processing is pretty well guaranteed to give it to you, sometimes in large quantities.

I suspect that your small sensor G9 may be giving you files that have a tendency for haloing baked in to them SOOC. If not, if you have the chance to re-do the edit, use less Clarity and find another way to get more vividness, such as more Contrast or making more use of the Shadows and Highlights (and Blacks and Whites) sliders if you have them to give you more contrast.

Further to what Craigdca suggested, you can treat haloing by using a well feathered brush to select the haloed area and lowering Highlights and tweaking (reducing) Clarity and Contrast for that selection. However, that will only have a reducing effect on them rather than getting rid of them altogether, especially if the haloing is pronounced. The best answer is to avoid haloing in the first place.

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Mar 16, 2021 14:14:03   #
PCL92
 
If you use photoshop just use the blur tool at 5-10% with a small brush and run it around the edge it will mitigate the halo.

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Mar 16, 2021 14:36:29   #
StanMac Loc: Tennessee
 
Thanks to all of you for all your information and pointers. I'm working on redoing the image post processing and will post my results and method when I'm finished.

Stan

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