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Dust spots
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Feb 26, 2021 19:47:59   #
GoofyNewfie Loc: Kansas City
 
Mileagemaker wrote:
Picture attached shows several dark dust spots. Have to enlarge it to see dust spots. Tried everything from rocket blaster to wet wipes. Tried at least 6 times. It is better but dark dust spots still show. Using a 18-300 Nikor lens with a Z-50 Mirrorless.


You need to check the "Store Original" box so we have something to enlarge.

( I shoot a white sheet of paper, a blank wall or a blank white computer screen to check my sensor.
Can do it anytime of day, doesn't matter how long the shutter is open because the sensor and dust is locked together...and no birds.)

I am curious to see what is recommended to use with mirrorless cameras that have IBIS.
Possibly looking at a Nikon Z6 next.

Feb 26, 2021 19:55:24   #
CHG_CANON Loc: the Windy City
 
Mileagemaker wrote:
Picture attached shows several dark dust spots. Have to enlarge it to see dust spots. Tried everything from rocket blaster to wet wipes. Tried at least 6 times. It is better but dark dust spots still show. Using a 18-300 Nikor lens with a Z-50 Mirrorless.

Thank you for the continued effort to post an example. But, please create a new <reply> and click the box 'store original' when posting the attachment. Thanks.



Feb 26, 2021 20:40:15   #
Mileagemaker Loc: Jackson NJ
 
hopefully this will do it. This picture is fine until I go smaller than F13. After F13 you will see dust spots. I am using a Nikor 18-300 mm with a Nikon Z-50 Mirrorless. Another comment was to take a picture of a white wall which I did. Again, it was shot at 5.6 since it was indoors and it showed no spots. Every picture I have taken is perfect until I go smaller than f13. I am shooting at 18mm on a cropped camera. I have a magnifying glass and I do not see any contamination on the lens or sensor.


(Download)

 
 
Feb 26, 2021 20:49:16   #
GoofyNewfie Loc: Kansas City
 
Mileagemaker wrote:
....Another comment was to take a picture of a white wall which I did. Again, it was shot at 5.6 since it was indoors and it showed no spots.


You can shoot inside at whatever shutter setting you need to test the smaller apertures.
1/2 sec, 1 sec... 3 seconds. Won’t matter., just just get the exposure right, or actually setting it to over expose by a stop or a bit more will help. You don't need to worry about camera shake because as I said above, the dust and sensor are locked together. Don’t even try to hold it steady. Don’t crank up the ISO either. What is important is the aperture. Stop it down The dust shows up more with smaller apertures because the light coming through the lens is more of a point source and will give you more defined shadows.

Feb 26, 2021 21:02:22   #
CHG_CANON Loc: the Windy City
 
Mileagemaker wrote:
hopefully this will do it. This picture is fine until I go smaller than F13. After F13 you will see dust spots. I am using a Nikor 18-300 mm with a Nikon Z-50 Mirrorless. Another comment was to take a picture of a white wall which I did. Again, it was shot at 5.6 since it was indoors and it showed no spots. Every picture I have taken is perfect until I go smaller than f13. I am shooting at 18mm on a cropped camera. I have a magnifying glass and I do not see any contamination on the lens or sensor.
hopefully this will do it. This picture is fine un... (show quote)


I went through your attachment and highlighted all the sensor dust I could find. Some are rather subtle and can be seen only when moving the image up n down. You'll find the dust easier to verify during cleaning by picking a brighter 'clean' background, like the ceiling of your room with lights on or taping a white piece of paper to the wall under a lamp.

Like the doctor says when you say it hurts when you do this, don't shoot at apertures smaller than f/11. Really, there's rarely a valid need in digital photography to go smaller than f/11 to f/13.

For cleaning, the dust is hard to see, even with a magnifying glass. Just use your blower and test. When using the blower, hold the camera fasting down and blow up into the body, without touching the sensor. Consider the more powerful Giotto Rocket-air as your blower tool. Give several strong blasts, restore the lens and capture a few test images at f/13. Repeat until the test images are clean.


(Download)

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