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Computer Monitor for Photo Editing
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Feb 22, 2021 22:59:27   #
authorizeduser Loc: Monroe, Michigan
 
I am currently using an HP 27" monitor 1920x1080 60hz. Works fine so far as I am concerned.
Local photo club is of the opinion I need a monitor which can display 27" 2560x1440 144hz monitor.

I thought my photo looked good on my current monitor. Can someone who uses the higher resolution
monitor chime in and tell me is it going to be better for photo editing? I would hate to drop $500 and be
disappointed.

I use my computer for photo editing and general use. I am NOT a gamer and will never be.


Thanks

Feb 22, 2021 23:22:12   #
Orphoto Loc: Oregon
 
First of all is the local club projecting with that high a resolution? Most that i'm aware of are still using the PSA standard of 1400x1050. If the club is running at the lower rate, you can too. It is really helpful to see those submitted images at 100% and all at once.

Having said that, the higher resolution screens are really nice. It is personally rewarding to see your work in somewhat higher resolutions. If you are doing lots of cloning and touch up work, it is helpful to work at higher resolutions and then reduce them down for presentation. Also, most of the higher res screens do a better job of projecting the entire srgb and adobe rgb gamuts and can be calibrated nicely.

Lastly, you do not need the 144 Hz refresh rate. That is for the gamers.

Feb 22, 2021 23:22:53   #
Fotoartist Loc: Detroit, Michigan
 
Well, it wouldn't hurt to up your resolution.
I have a 2560 x 1440 27" display but I use it at a resolution of 2048 x 1152 (That's only one size up from you) for the reason that the type and panels become too small to read at 2560 x 1440 resolution.

 
 
Feb 23, 2021 05:23:30   #
tcthome Loc: Keansburg , NJ
 
Fotoartist wrote:
Well, it wouldn't hurt to up your resolution.
I have a 2560 x 1440 27" display but I use it at a resolution of 2048 x 1152 (That's only one size up from you) for the reason that the type and panels become too small to read at 2560 x 1440 resolution.


Adobe only? Think they would of fixed it by now.

Feb 23, 2021 05:41:33   #
tcthome Loc: Keansburg , NJ
 
Orphoto wrote:
First of all is the local club projecting with that high a resolution? Most that i'm aware of are still using the PSA standard of 1400x1050. If the club is running at the lower rate, you can too. It is really helpful to see those submitted images at 100% and all at once.

Having said that, the higher resolution screens are really nice. It is personally rewarding to see your work in somewhat higher resolutions. If you are doing lots of cloning and touch up work, it is helpful to work at higher resolutions and then reduce them down for presentation. Also, most of the higher res screens do a better job of projecting the entire srgb and adobe rgb color gamuts and can be calibrated nicely.

Lastly, you do not need the 144 Hz refresh rate. That is for the gamers.
First of all is the local club projecting with tha... (show quote)


Can you calibrate the monitor you have now? Anyway check out some models from Dell & BenQ. Look to get as close to 100% srgb & 100% Adobe rgb as you can with your budget. You would probably want to make sure it can be calibrated(contact manufacture). I have a LG, that is some where up in the 90's % with both sRGB & Adobe RGB & was had on sale for $220 a few years back. It calibrates & my prints match my screen which is all I need.

Feb 23, 2021 06:10:34   #
John N Loc: HP14 3QF Stokenchurch, UK
 
Orphoto wrote:
First of all is the local club projecting with that high a resolution? Most that i'm aware of are still using the PSA standard of 1400x1050. If the club is running at the lower rate, you can too. It is really helpful to see those submitted images at 100% and all at once.


I queried this with the Royal Photographic Society when a club I was a member of needed a new projector. They were keeping an open eye on it. For many clubs the next generation in resolution projection is a big financial commitment.

My current club use 1400 x 1050 so pretty much whatever screen you use you are going to have to resize for competition / club display. Personally I'd like an UHDTV on the wall (that Panasonic CRT refuses to die) and a monitor of similar specification, perhaps 27 / 29" for editing. Refresh rate not to important but I've been told that a higher refresh rate is easier on the glimmers if you are sitting close for long periods of time.

Feb 23, 2021 07:41:33   #
Ourspolair
 
Good question. What is the native output of your camera? 24k sensor is 4000x6000 pixels...
There are a lot of 27" 4k IFS screens out there for less than $500. I would recommend that you do your research and read the reviews. I have been using a 27" (calibrated) 4k screen and also have a 55" 4k television with hdmi input that I calibrate and use when I am feeling "picky" and want to work a little further away from the screen. As others have said, just make sure that you have access to the OSD (On Screen Display) for calibration.

 
 
Feb 23, 2021 08:11:37   #
keywest305
 
I bought a 40" LG 4k and can honestly say I love looking at my pics on here. So crisp and clean and photo editing if very enjoyable now as my eyes are not what they used to be. Best Buys had it on sale and I grabbed it. Love it

Feb 23, 2021 08:50:17   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
I'd suggest an EIZO ColorEdge CG319X 31.1" 17:9 Hardware Calibration IPS Monitor. This would certainly quiet your photo club.
--Bob
authorizeduser wrote:
I am currently using an HP 27" monitor 1920x1080 60hz. Works fine so far as I am concerned.
Local photo club is of the opinion I need a monitor which can display 27" 2560x1440 144hz monitor.

I thought my photo looked good on my current monitor. Can someone who uses the higher resolution
monitor chime in and tell me is it going to be better for photo editing? I would hate to drop $500 and be
disappointed.

I use my computer for photo editing and general use. I am NOT a gamer and will never be.


Thanks
I am currently using an HP 27" monitor 1920x1... (show quote)

Feb 23, 2021 08:58:21   #
BigDaddy Loc: Pittsburgh, PA
 
authorizeduser wrote:
I am currently using an HP 27" monitor 1920x1080 60hz. Works fine so far as I am concerned.
Local photo club is of the opinion I need a monitor which can display 27" 2560x1440 144hz monitor.

I thought my photo looked good on my current monitor. Can someone who uses the higher resolution
monitor chime in and tell me is it going to be better for photo editing? I would hate to drop $500 and be
disappointed.

I use my computer for photo editing and general use. I am NOT a gamer and will never be.
Thanks
I am currently using an HP 27" monitor 1920x1... (show quote)

I have a 27" monitor and run it at 1920x1080. That is pretty much a standard that HD TV's use, and cell phones use.
My monitor is a cheap one, under $200. Like you, I'm happy with it and really, I resize all my photo's for viewing on my desktop, or HD TV or cell phone. 1920x1080 is what they use. I reckon a better monitor would show more problems in my editing, but as long as my work looks good to me, I'm happy. For example, a number of people here have complained about jpg vs raw showing banding that I simply could not see. No way I would run out and buy a super expensive monitor just so I could see the banding I could not see.

I could easily re-size my photo's with double, triple or whatever resolution I want as long as it is in the 1.77:1 ratio my
24mp, 6000x4000 camera will allow.. I've done it and the pictures look the same (to me) on my 55",47", 42" and 32" HD TV's, so that is the resolution I crop my pictures to for my viewing on all my screens.

To me, what you have now is perfect. I guess it depends on what you are doing with the pics. Your camera determines the initial resolution, in my case, it maxes out at 6000x4000. I can re-size and or crop it to 1440x1050, or any resolution I want, within that range. I choose 1920x1080 because that's the size all my screens chose to use. If I were in your club, I reckon I'd resize those to 1440x1050.

Feb 23, 2021 11:01:19   #
Fotoartist Loc: Detroit, Michigan
 
Does anybody have the issue I have that when my monitor (27" 2560x1440 144hz) is set to a very high resolution the type in the panels becomes very tiny and hard to see?

 
 
Feb 23, 2021 11:33:45   #
BigDaddy Loc: Pittsburgh, PA
 
Fotoartist wrote:
Does anybody have the issue I have that when my monitor (27" 2560x1440 144hz) is set to a very high resolution the type in the panels becomes very tiny and hard to see?

The more pixels, the smaller the pixels. Your choices are to decrease the number of pixels or increase the size of your type.
2560x1440 is 1.77:1, or 16x9 or 1920x1080. All are the same ratio. Try changing your screen resolution to 1920x1080. You should also be able to tell your system to change the size of your type.

Feb 23, 2021 12:27:19   #
Jahmoe
 
for $$599 you could have the Cadillac of photo editing monitor: BenQ SW2700PT 27" 16:9 Photographer IPS Monitor

Feb 23, 2021 14:53:24   #
volvo13 Loc: Sacramento, CA
 
I stepped up from an old Samsung 21" 1080p to this;

ASUS ProArt Display PA278QV 27” WQHD (2560 x 1440) Monitor

It was the best bang for the buck that I could find reviews wise. Great screen size to work on editing details and it comes factory calibrated. Looks like it's $289 on Amazon right now.

At 27" running 1080p your just not getting the screen resolution that you need for a computer monitor at that size. Don't beleive the 4k hype either, you don't "need" to push 4k resolution until you go above 27".

Make sure that your computer can push that high a resolution. My PC has a R9 390 graphics card that easily pushes up that high. I had no idea the pica from D7000 looked that good.

Even as a sometimes gamer I find that a 60hz refresh rate is completely fine.

....and finally, if your happy with what you have, why upgrade?

This is all just my opinion. I did a bunch of Google research before stepping up from my old monitor.

Feb 23, 2021 15:08:42   #
burkphoto Loc: High Point, NC
 
authorizeduser wrote:
I am currently using an HP 27" monitor 1920x1080 60hz. Works fine so far as I am concerned.
Local photo club is of the opinion I need a monitor which can display 27" 2560x1440 144hz monitor.

I thought my photo looked good on my current monitor. Can someone who uses the higher resolution
monitor chime in and tell me is it going to be better for photo editing? I would hate to drop $500 and be
disappointed.

I use my computer for photo editing and general use. I am NOT a gamer and will never be.


Thanks
I am currently using an HP 27" monitor 1920x1... (show quote)


More important than refresh rate or resolution is COLOR ACCURACY. You want a monitor that can display 100% of the sRGB ICC color gamut, or better, 100% of the P3 color gamut, or best, 99% of Adobe RGB.

The bit depth of output is important, too. Most cheap monitors use 8 bits per color channel. 10 bits per channel is better. 14 bits per channel is phenomenal. Office monitors are calibrated for budgets. Gaming monitors are made for speed. Monitors made for graphic arts and photography are engineered for color accuracy.

For best use in photography, your monitor should be calibrated at least monthly with a hardware device (colorimeter or spectrophotometer), using the software that comes with the calibration device. That takes about ten minutes or so.

To get "What You See Is What You Get" color (your prints look very much like the image on your monitor), you need to calibrate to these aims, or close to them:

Color Temperature 5800K to 6500K
White Point 80 to 120 candelas per square meter (cd/m^2) (I like 105-120)
Black Point 0.5 cd/m^2
Gamma 2.2

If your prints are too dark, the monitor is too bright. Increase the white point.
If your prints are too light, the monitor is too dark. Lower the white point.

If your prints are off-color, too contrasty, or too flat, your calibration and/or monitor profile are wrong. Use a calibration kit with the aims above, and try again.

Keep your "color evaluation area" very dimly lit with a 5000K CFL lamp, and as close to neutral gray in color as you can. My computer desktop is medium dark gray (no desktop picture).

I calibrate my old iMac with a DataColor SpyderProX kit. It is a very close match to my prints. The same kit calibrates TVs and projectors.

I'd be wary of advice you get from camera club members unless they have had professional training in color management systems and procedures. There is plenty of BS flying around out there. Both DataColor and X-Rite have plenty of educational materials on their websites.

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