Ugly Hedgehog - Photography Forum
A Look At The Past....
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Feb 22, 2021 15:33:54   #
Cany143 Loc: SE Utah
 
....and a look to the future.

Archaeology doesn't always present a pretty picture. While I hope no one takes offense at any of these images, they do in fact represent what is both actual and is in place. Only #5 can be considered in any way 'inaccurate' since it shows --as a multi-shot pano-- a greater than 180 degree view of the setting.

Congress designated Arches Nat'l Park a National Monument in 1929; National Park status was not conferred until 1971. This site was first documented in 1957, though it had obviously been seen --and camped at-- well before then. Its difficult to know whether the J. Harpole inscription was made in 1946 or 1948, and it's even harder to know when the (difficult to see) concentric circles, geometrics and animal figures were made, but corrugated and polished grayware pottery that had been recovered, and stone tools that can still be found on site, suggests the presence of people over 700 years previous.

A good place to camp is a good place to camp. The SE facing cliff wall absorbs a lot of radiant energy, and it keeps the place relatively warm well into the night, even in the coldest days of winter.


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Feb 22, 2021 15:56:30   #
Sinewsworn Loc: Port Orchard, WA
 
Cany143 wrote:
....and a look to the future.

Archaeology doesn't always present a pretty picture. While I hope no one takes offense at any of these images, they do in fact represent what is both actual and is in place. Only #5 can be considered in any way 'inaccurate' since it shows --as a multi-shot pano-- a greater than 180 degree view of the setting.

Congress designated Arches Nat'l Park a National Monument in 1929; National Park status was not conferred until 1971. This site was first documented in 1957, though it had obviously been seen --and camped at-- well before then. Its difficult to know whether the J. Harpole inscription was made in 1946 or 1948, and it's even harder to know when the (difficult to see) concentric circles, geometrics and animal figures were made, but corrugated and polished grayware pottery that had been recovered, and stone tools that can still be found on site, suggests the presence of people over 700 years previous.

A good place to camp is a good place to camp. The SE facing cliff wall absorbs a lot of radiant energy, and it keeps the place relatively warm well into the night, even in the coldest days of winter.
....and a look to the future. br br Archaeology d... (show quote)


Great set! Do you think the natives who originally left us some petroglyphs were simply leaving messages just as the assholes did more recently? Thanx for sharing.

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Feb 22, 2021 16:17:34   #
Cany143 Loc: SE Utah
 
Sinewsworn wrote:
Great set! Do you think the natives who originally left us some petroglyphs were simply leaving messages just as the assholes did more recently? Thanx for sharing.


Some years ago, I was asked to write a piece about rock art for an NPS publication. The following is what got published:

Reading Rock Art

If you travel the canyons of the American Southwest, you are sure to see figures carved or painted on rock faces. These include abstractions like spirals and dots, or more recognizable forms like animals, humans and handprints. Whatever they represent, these curious figures provoke within most people the desire to understand.

For lack of a better term, we call it “rock art,” but these images are more than mere adornments hung on the landscape. They are communications between people, written not with letters but with visceral, vital imagery. And if we look closely and compare different rock art panels, themes and characteristics emerge, as well as something on the edge of comprehension. A figure on horseback suggests a relatively recent date of production. The portrayal of an atlatl recalls a much older archaic period. A line of ghostly figures holding snakes with birds or other animals hovering above them may suggest an otherworldly experience. In effect, the odd figures convey the social, economic and religious concerns of many different cultures, both historic and prehistoric.

Imagine trying to convey a concept as simple as “food this way” in pictures, or one as complex as your deepest fears and highest aspirations. What symbols would you use? Would a person a thousand years from now
understand them? Would they be able to follow your directions to water or understand your place in the cosmos?
Whatever the intent, rock art can be considered the celebrations, maps and practical wisdom left by indigenous people for those who would follow. Through rock art, knowledge could be passed to future generations—including our own. Though we may not understand them, petroglyphs and pictographs often inspire a sense of awe and
wonder.

One translation of these images might well be: “listen and survive.”

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Feb 22, 2021 16:19:33   #
Sinewsworn Loc: Port Orchard, WA
 
Cany143 wrote:
Some years ago, I was asked to write a piece about rock art for an NPS publication. The following is what got published:

Reading Rock Art

If you travel the canyons of the American Southwest, you are sure to see figures carved or painted on rock faces. These include abstractions like spirals and dots, or more recognizable forms like animals, humans and handprints. Whatever they represent, these curious figures provoke within most people the desire to understand.

For lack of a better term, we call it “rock art,” but these images are more than mere adornments hung on the landscape. They are communications between people, written not with letters but with visceral, vital imagery. And if we look closely and compare different rock art panels, themes and characteristics emerge, as well as something on the edge of comprehension. A figure on horseback suggests a relatively recent date of production. The portrayal of an atlatl recalls a much older archaic period. A line of ghostly figures holding snakes with birds or other animals hovering above them may suggest an otherworldly experience. In effect, the odd figures convey the social, economic and religious concerns of many different cultures, both historic and prehistoric.

Imagine trying to convey a concept as simple as “food this way” in pictures, or one as complex as your deepest fears and highest aspirations. What symbols would you use? Would a person a thousand years from now
understand them? Would they be able to follow your directions to water or understand your place in the cosmos?
Whatever the intent, rock art can be considered the celebrations, maps and practical wisdom left by indigenous people for those who would follow. Through rock art, knowledge could be passed to future generations—including our own. Though we may not understand them, petroglyphs and pictographs often inspire a sense of awe and
wonder.

One translation of these images might well be: “listen and survive.”
Some years ago, I was asked to write a piece about... (show quote)



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Feb 22, 2021 16:42:49   #
CindyHouk Loc: Columbia Falls MT
 
Love the shots and history to go with it. And your article is excellent! We have quite a few places here in MT where you can see the petroglyphs, some well know locations but I love coming across them in unknown locations!

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Feb 22, 2021 17:18:24   #
UTMike Loc: South Jordan, UT
 
It has been a while since you posted some of your excellent "rock art" work, Jim, thanks!

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Feb 22, 2021 17:55:01   #
Xmsmn Loc: Minnesota
 
Wow, talk about making you think. Still pondering what kind of signage/symbols one would leave now to communicate the simple but important things as you suggested. Great series, thanks for sharing.
Mark

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Feb 22, 2021 18:06:42   #
Raz Theo Loc: Music City
 
[quote=Cany143]....and a look to the future.
Jim, all of your wonderful images of that incredible land always vividly bring me back to 1969 when my new bride and I were traveling from Escalante to Green River and on to Denver. It was a wild and crazy ride for a couple of neophytes. I remember an awe inspiring emptiness wherever we looked and I also remember some small billboard signs right around what I think is now the main entrance to Arches which proclaimed "Arches National Park Coming Soon".
All of which brings me to the question I've wanted to ask you: I'm certain there are many roads in places now where 50 years ago there weren't even places, so do you hike or drive to most of your locales and how far off the beaten path do these treks take you.
Yeah I know, I'm a bag of gas.
RTW

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Feb 22, 2021 19:10:55   #
Cany143 Loc: SE Utah
 
Rather than commenting on your memories of the 'awe inspiring emptiness' (emptiness? hah! the place is chock full of wonders big and small!!!), I'll instead just cut to your question.

Depends on how you define 'roads.' On the one hand, men stood on the Moon before I-70 was blasted through Spotted Wolf Canyon and up and over the San Rafael Swell to cross southern Utah. On the other hand, there's more two-track 4WD "roads" now that lead off in all sorts of directions than there's ever been. Of a hundred illustrations I could describe, there's one place in particular I've been meaning to get back to that the first few times I'd gone there, I knew to take the third turn, the one where the remains of an old and blasted out truck tire marked the spot. Now --or the last couple of times I've been out that way these past several (ten?) years-- there's half a dozen more "roads" in about the right spot, and the truck tire has either disintegrated completely, or its been carted off by some old and blasted out truck tire collector. As for me, now, I've saved GPS waypoints and routes by the score. Which doesn't mean I don't try out places --even "roads"-- I haven't previously been.

So far as whether I hike or drive to most of my locales, Raz, I (almost) always drive. Those drives get me to within either 10 feet or 10 miles of where I want to be. After that, its always downhill. And then its uphill. Coupled with some more downhill. And after that, its up that talus slope or down and eventually out of that gulley. These days --since I'm an 'old' (and I've gotten as lazy as I've gotten jaded)--, I seldom hike more than a mile or three. Or four. All at once.

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Feb 22, 2021 19:50:28   #
Cany143 Loc: SE Utah
 
Xmsmn wrote:
Wow, talk about making you think. Still pondering what kind of signage/symbols one would leave now to communicate the simple but important things as you suggested. Great series, thanks for sharing.
Mark


I like to think hope that some of photography might work toward exactly what you're pondering, Mark.

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Feb 22, 2021 20:01:45   #
Cany143 Loc: SE Utah
 
CindyHouk wrote:
Love the shots and history to go with it. And your article is excellent! We have quite a few places here in MT where you can see the petroglyphs, some well know locations but I love coming across them in unknown locations!


Yup, there's some nifty stuff up there in Montanistan, too, Cindy. Seen one or three really killer ones up there, too, but probably nothing quite as good as the stuff only the locals know about. And besides, the ones I'd seen were only shown to me by some high-fallutin' archaeologist/roquert specialists. Their (a married couple) name is Greer. Ever heard of 'em?

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Feb 22, 2021 20:10:55   #
CindyHouk Loc: Columbia Falls MT
 
Cany143 wrote:
Yup, there's some nifty stuff up there in Montanistan, too, Cindy. Seen one or three really killer ones up there, too, but probably nothing quite as good as the stuff only the locals know about. And besides, the ones I'd seen were only shown to me by some high-fallutin' archaeologist/roquert specialists. Their (a married couple) name is Greer. Ever heard of 'em?


Sorry to say but No I haven't heard of them.

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Feb 22, 2021 21:07:55   #
Raz Theo Loc: Music City
 
[quote=Cany143]Rather than commenting on your memories of the 'awe inspiring emptiness' (emptiness? hah! the place is chock full of wonders big and small!!!), I'll instead just cut to your question.

Jim, just to be sure you know your world gets the ultimate respect from me, when I said "awe inspiring" it wasn't the emptiness I was referring to; it was those very wonders big & small you mention. And in my travels all over the globe I've yet to witness (up close) such wide open scenes as those in the Monuments part of Utah short of traveling to the extreme latitudes like, say Agostini National Park in Patagonia or ANWR in Alaska. And there's a lot of "emptiness" there too - you'd need a drone to see those wonders; definitely no roads.
RT

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Feb 23, 2021 11:51:39   #
Earnest Botello Loc: Hockley, Texas
 
Great set, Jim.

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Feb 23, 2021 13:47:53   #
brucebc Loc: Tooele, Utah
 
In reference to the more modern art in images 3 and 4; my grandma said "Fools names and fools faces often appear in public places". I also Googled 42GR290 and spent some time looking at it. Where do you find these publications? Your photos and comments are the main reason I look at this site every day. Please keep posting.

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