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taking pictures of sun sets and sun downs
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Feb 22, 2021 07:33:38   #
JOEharbor
 
any help on how to get the best colors in pictures taken of sunsets or sun downs. any filters you suggest? thank you Joe

Feb 22, 2021 08:12:39   #
camerapapi Loc: Miami, Fl.
 
I would swear we had a similar question recently in this forum. I guess you missed it!

For best colors use sunlight white balance. Each camera is different as it is their rendition of colors. You can always saturate colors to taste in post. Underexposing slightly always saturates colors.
In regard to filters I do not use any. If shooting seascapes to obtain that silky effect in the water a neutral density filter is useful.

Feb 22, 2021 08:13:27   #
JOEharbor
 
Thank you for your help. Joe

 
 
Feb 22, 2021 08:14:31   #
JOEharbor
 
Thank yo for your help. I didn't see the other information. Joe

Feb 22, 2021 08:48:30   #
RichardTaylor Loc: Sydney, Australia
 
Possibly a ND graduated filter will help control the contrast, depending on the light.

Feb 22, 2021 09:25:01   #
E.L.. Shapiro Loc: Ottawa, Ontario Canada
 
Bracket your exposure for various effects. Meter different parts of the scene. If you have the time and patience, arrive at the location just before sunrise and make a series of exposures- you will get more dramatic colours and effects earlier in the event. For sunsets, also arrive early and hang in there 'till just before twilight. Picturesque cloud formations and skyscapes add to the effect. Look for compositionally effective landscapes and objects for foreground framing. You are shooting directly into the sun and at certain times, flare can be a problem- a tree or structure can be a handy lens shade from certain angles. Mist, steam, smoke, fog, airborne particles and pollution can add interesting texture and colours. Shoot a bunch and pick the best. Sometimes dramatic changes occur in just a few seconds or minutes. You don't want to see the best effect in your rearview mirror!

Additional edit- The colour temperature at sunrise and sunset is way below "daylight" midday temperatures. A daylight WB setting will usually yield a yell/red bias which is fine. If however, you also try some exposure at a "tungsten" setting you may get a cooler or more authentic colour rendition- may be surprisingly interesting.

Feb 22, 2021 09:38:50   #
saxman71 Loc: Seattle
 
E.L.. Shapiro wrote:
Sometimes dramatic changes occur in just a few seconds or minutes. You don't want to see the best effect in your rearview mirror!


That last sentence is particularly sound advice in my opinion. In the case of sunsets it is easy to give up on them too soon. Some of the best color often occurs at the very end of the sunset. There were occasions in the past where I have been guilty of seeing the "best effect in [my] rearview mirror". Stay until the end.

 
 
Feb 22, 2021 09:47:09   #
CHG_CANON Loc: the Windy City
 
camerapapi wrote:
I would swear we had a similar question recently in this forum. I guess you missed it!

For best colors use sunlight white balance. Each camera is different as it is their rendition of colors. You can always saturate colors to taste in post. Underexposing slightly always saturates colors.
In regard to filters I do not use any. If shooting seascapes to obtain that silky effect in the water a neutral density filter is useful.


Yes, the question was recently asked, even by the same member: https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-686585-1.html

Feb 22, 2021 09:49:37   #
Leitz Loc: Solms
 
JOEharbor wrote:
any help on how to get the best colors in pictures taken of sunsets or sun downs. any filters you suggest? thank you Joe

What's the difference between sun set and sun down?

Feb 22, 2021 09:58:29   #
bleirer
 
JOEharbor wrote:
any help on how to get the best colors in pictures taken of sunsets or sun downs. any filters you suggest? thank you Joe


Exposure is important but it depends on your artistic intent. If your camera has blinkies that can make things easier. Otherwise the histogram can help, plus old fashioned chimping.

With blinkies, just decide what part of the scene is ok to you for it to have no detail or texture. Anything blinking is in danger of being blown out. But that might be OK with you. For example if the sun is visible you might say it is ok for it to be a detail-less blob of color, so take a test shot and if the sun is not blinking increase the exposure until it barely is. On the other hand if the sun is blinking but you want it to have texture and detail then reduce the exposure until it is just barely not blinking. If there is no sun in the scene, the same idea goes for whatever part is the brightest, if you care about that part having texture and detail, adjust the exposure until it is just below blinking. Any part of the scene that is blinking might be blown out, but you have to decide if that is how you like it. I personally like texture and detail in everything but the sun itself.

This is also a good time to check out HDR in your camera or in programs like Lightroom. But that is a different topic. Also Lightroom and similar have a lot of tools that can be helpful, gradients for example, but nothing will bring back a blown out detail-less part of the image.

Feb 22, 2021 12:12:46   #
E.L.. Shapiro Loc: Ottawa, Ontario Canada
 
bleirer wrote:
Exposure is important but it depends on your artistic intent. If your camera has blinkies that can make things easier. Otherwise the histogram can help, plus old fashioned chimping.

With blinkies, just decide what part of the scene is ok to you for it to have no detail or texture. Anything blinking is in danger of being blown out. But that might be OK with you. For example if the sun is visible you might say it is ok for it to be a detail-less blob of color, so take a test shot and if the sun is not blinking increase the exposure until it barely is. On the other hand if the sun is blinking but you want it to have texture and detail then reduce the exposure until it is just barely not blinking. If there is no sun in the scene, the same idea goes for whatever part is the brightest, if you care about that part having texture and detail, adjust the exposure until it is just below blinking. Any part of the scene that is blinking might be blown out, but you have to decide if that is how you like it. I personally like texture and detail in everything but the sun itself.

This is also a good time to check out HDR in your camera or in programs like Lightroom. But that is a different topic. Also Lightroom and similar have a lot of tools that can be helpful, gradients for example, but nothing will bring back a blown-out detail-less part of the image.
Exposure is important but it depends on your artis... (show quote)


You are correct. That is why I suggested bracketing and shooting many variations and frames. One wouldn't think that a sunset or sunrise requires the same approach as to coverage of a rapidly moving sports event. The problematic issues are a high scene contrast, at some stage of the event, shooting directly into an intese ligh source, and trying to capture a scene that is well beyond the dynamic range of most cameras. At the beginning and end of each event, the light level and constant as well as the colour temperate is changing rapidly. With a variety of exposure options, you will have more to select from and enhance in post-processing.

 
 
Feb 22, 2021 16:46:36   #
JOEharbor
 
E.L.. Shapiro wrote:
Bracket your exposure for various effects. Meter different parts of the scene. If you have the time and patience, arrive at the location just before sunrise and make a series of exposures- you will get more dramatic colours and effects earlier in the event. For sunsets, also arrive early and hang in there 'till just before twilight. Picturesque cloud formations and skyscapes add to the effect. Look for compositionally effective landscapes and objects for foreground framing. You are shooting directly into the sun and at certain times, flare can be a problem- a tree or structure can be a handy lens shade from certain angles. Mist, steam, smoke, fog, airborne particles and pollution can add interesting texture and colours. Shoot a bunch and pick the best. Sometimes dramatic changes occur in just a few seconds or minutes. You don't want to see the best effect in your rearview mirror!

Additional edit- The colour temperature at sunrise and sunset is way below "daylight" midday temperatures. A daylight WB setting will usually yield a yell/red bias which is fine. If however, you also try some exposure at a "tungsten" setting you may get a cooler or more authentic colour rendition- may be surprisingly interesting.
Bracket your exposure for various effects. Meter d... (show quote)

Feb 22, 2021 16:46:52   #
JOEharbor
 
thank you very much. Joe

Feb 22, 2021 19:26:42   #
peekaboo
 
All I did was meter thru the camera and this was the results



Feb 23, 2021 06:13:24   #
awis01
 
camerapapi wrote:
I would swear we had a similar question recently in this forum. I guess you missed it!

For best colors use sunlight white balance. Each camera is different as it is their rendition of colors. You can always saturate colors to taste in post. Underexposing slightly always saturates colors.
In regard to filters I do not use any. If shooting seascapes to obtain that silky effect in the water a neutral density filter is useful.


Please se the above post re Any NewQuestions particularly the photo

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