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The Best Free Photoshop Alternative Online
Feb 22, 2021 00:10:50   #
selena18
 
This is a free Photoshop clone running entirely on your browser. I'm actually really impressed by what it can
achieve, and I've been even more shocked to find it operates.
https://www.photopea.com/
https://epho.mystrikingly.com/blog/free-image-editing-program-suggested



Feb 22, 2021 03:27:48   #
Craigdca Loc: Pasadena, California
 
Even if the software is amazing, consider the fact that your data/image/intellectual property is stored on someone else’s system.

Feb 22, 2021 09:14:58   #
twosummers
 
OMG! This is absolutely brilliant and thank you for posting the information. After searching for days to find some way of altering the initial viewing point of my panorama files - here is the simplest solution. Prior to this my son-in-law has had to help by using his photoshop app. Thanks again!!!!

 
 
Feb 22, 2021 10:51:53   #
Ysarex
 
Ouch! It is 100% not color managed -- to the point where it actually removes any color space tags from photos you load into it. All color then in that app is by default undefined.

Feb 22, 2021 11:20:16   #
Hanson
 
Please explain more. What happens to the colors? Are they lost or they cannot be changed/manipulated?

Feb 22, 2021 12:41:47   #
Ysarex
 
Hanson wrote:
Please explain more. What happens to the colors? Are they lost or they cannot be changed/manipulated?

The default structure that we use for our color photographs (JPEGs, TIFFs, PNGs, etc.) is three channel RGB. A pixel in a photo then has a red channel value, a green channel value and a blue channel value. They're digital so we're talking about numbers. The range of numbers we use is typically from 0 to 255 (2^8). So a green pixel in your photo might be R = 20, G = 170, B = 25. Those three color values mix to make green (see 1st illustration below).

However that's not enough yet to identify the color. An analogy would be that many of the different languages in use around the world have adopted the same alphabetic symbols. I'm writing in English and I just used the conjunction "and." You know what I meant. BUT in a different language context I could use "and" like this: En ny and i dammen. And in Danish is a water fowl.

So with only the three RGB values we don't really know the specific color. In the 2nd illustration below I hope you see two different greens. Both have the exact same RGB values so that based only on those numbers there's only one color there. Just like with the language context for "and" those RGB values require a color space context in order to have meaning. We maintain and use different color spaces for different reasons. We don't have a one size fits all option and we're not going to do that. So when we create a digital photo and want to specify the colors in the photo we have to use the correct color space -- color management.

All digital cameras without exception assign a color space when they create a final photo. The color space is embedded in the photo file as an ICC profile tag. All raw processing software assigns that color space tag when a photo is exported in an RGB format. All digital photos must have a color space tag embedded in the file if the colors in the photo are to be interpreted and displayed correctly. Color managed software (almost all photo processing and display software) looks for and correctly applies that color space tag that should be in the photo. Any software that doesn't do that is doing something very wrong.

The photo comparison below is an egregious example and I set it up to make the point. For most people they won't notice the change because it'll be less extreme. I deliberately looked for a photo with lots of intense greens as they are especially effected. I opened the photo in PS (left side) and then opened the exact same photo in Photopea and made no changes but used Photopea to export a new JPEG. The difference you see is that Photopea not only ignored but in fact removed the photo's ICC color space tag and so left the colors in the photo undefined.






(Download)

Feb 22, 2021 16:52:44   #
Hanson
 
Ysarex wrote:
The default structure that we use for our color photographs (JPEGs, TIFFs, PNGs, etc.) is three channel RGB. A pixel in a photo then has a red channel value, a green channel value and a blue channel value. They're digital so we're talking about numbers. The range of numbers we use is typically from 0 to 255 (2^8). So a green pixel in your photo might be R = 20, G = 170, B = 25. Those three color values mix to make green (see 1st illustration below).

However that's not enough yet to identify the color. An analogy would be that many of the different languages in use around the world have adopted the same alphabetic symbols. I'm writing in English and I just used the conjunction "and." You know what I meant. BUT in a different language context I could use "and" like this: En ny and i dammen. And in Danish is a water fowl.

So with only the three RGB values we don't really know the specific color. In the 2nd illustration below I hope you see two different greens. Both have the exact same RGB values so that based only on those numbers there's only one color there. Just like with the language context for "and" those RGB values require a color space context in order to have meaning. We maintain and use different color spaces for different reasons. We don't have a one size fits all option and we're not going to do that. So when we create a digital photo and want to specify the colors in the photo we have to use the correct color space -- color management.

All digital cameras without exception assign a color space when they create a final photo. The color space is embedded in the photo file as an ICC profile tag. All raw processing software assigns that color space tag when a photo is exported in an RGB format. All digital photos must have a color space tag embedded in the file if the colors in the photo are to be interpreted and displayed correctly. Color managed software (almost all photo processing and display software) looks for and correctly applies that color space tag that should be in the photo. Any software that doesn't do that is doing something very wrong.

The photo comparison below is an egregious example and I set it up to make the point. For most people they won't notice the change because it'll be less extreme. I deliberately looked for a photo with lots of intense greens as they are especially effected. I opened the photo in PS (left side) and then opened the exact same photo in Photopea and made no changes but used Photopea to export a new JPEG. The difference you see is that Photopea not only ignored but in fact removed the photo's ICC color space tag and so left the colors in the photo undefined.
The default structure that we use for our color ph... (show quote)


Thank you for such a knowledgeable explanation. So what can we derive from this? This software is no good?

 
 
Feb 22, 2021 17:08:09   #
Ysarex
 
Hanson wrote:
Thank you for such a knowledgeable explanation. So what can we derive from this? This software is no good?


Well, it certainly has one glaring hole -- photo processing software should support standard color management. You could try and work around that as long as you know what it's doing, but there are other alternatives including free ones that do the job right. Look at Glimpse for example.

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