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Feb 19, 2021 16:29:48   #
greger Loc: benton harbor, mi
 
hi, I use a canon t5i. what would be a good canon camera for good low light performance? would I need to go full frame? I do have a couple ef lenes.
thanks

Feb 19, 2021 16:51:11   #
Mark Sturtevant Loc: Grand Blanc, MI
 
I have that body. I can't provide specific suggestions, but anything newer will likely do better in lower light. It being the case that this aspect of performance tends to improve with time.

Feb 19, 2021 16:53:09   #
Pepsiman Loc: New York City
 
Try a faster lens like the 50mm 1.8

 
 
Feb 19, 2021 16:55:51   #
sb Loc: Florida's East Coast
 
I upgraded to a Canon 6D a while back (the original version - I bought a refurbished one from Canon) and have been amazed at it's low light performance. Be aware that lenses for your t5i may not work on a full-frame camera.

The following is a post I did when I first got this camera. The photos are amazingly non-grainy for being done with very high ISO.

http://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-470932-1.html

Feb 19, 2021 17:17:34   #
RPaul3rd Loc: Arlington VA and Sarasota FL
 
I have Canon SL2 which I take on holidays overseas. It's light ... and all Canon digital lenses fit it. But it's been remarkable when it comes to taking lower light photos in places like churches and other places. Why do I say lower light photos? A tripod will always be necessary when shooting low light or nearly no light situations. These are from the interior of Paris Notre Dame Cathedral from a couple of years ago and inside The Duomo in Florence Italy. These are not perfect but, given the circumstances, I like them. BTW, the SL2 is NOT full-frame. Good luck!





Feb 19, 2021 17:39:03   #
bleirer
 
greger wrote:
hi, I use a canon t5i. what would be a good canon camera for good low light performance? would I need to go full frame? I do have a couple ef lenes.
thanks


You didn't mention a budget, so that would help. I have Canon's entry level mirrorless full frame, the EOS RP, and like it a lot. There is an adapter for ef and ef-s lenses, but the ef-s lenses switch the camera to crop mode which is fewer megapixels. There is rumored to be an even more budget minded full frame canon mirrorless in the planning stage if you are not in a hurry.

Feb 19, 2021 17:56:11   #
Longshadow Loc: Audubon, PA
 
Have you tried yours in any low light conditions?
How were the results? Acceptable? Not acceptable?
What is your current lens(es) largest aperture?
What are you planning on shooting?
Is it a prime reason for getting a new camera?

 
 
Feb 19, 2021 17:56:35   #
CHG_CANON Loc: the Windy City
 
greger wrote:
hi, I use a canon t5i. what would be a good canon camera for good low light performance? would I need to go full frame? I do have a couple ef lenes.
thanks


Your T5i features an older generation of 18MP sensors that were the Canon standard for cameras in 2010 to 2014. These cameras were challenged above say ISO-1600 without the use of flash and / or faster lenses to hold that ISO at ISO-1600 or lower.

That said, are you shooting in RAW and "exposing to the right" in your current work? Do you have an example JPEG you can post as a reply that shows the problems and actual low-light situations you encounter today? There may be opportunities in your technique or choice of lenses that will have a bigger impact before defaulting to a new camera.

Feb 20, 2021 05:26:04   #
miked46 Loc: Winter Springs, Florida
 
I'm getting great results with my 80D and also using a Sigma 30mm, f/1.4 lens for evening street photography.
I imagine the 90D would be an improvement

Feb 20, 2021 07:23:43   #
Mojaveflyer Loc: Denver, CO
 
I'm am member of Astrophotography For Beginners on Farcebook and I see many people shooting older Rebel bodies (T3i, T5i, etc) with very good results. I have a T6i and a 60D modded for astrophotography with good results. Shoot in RAW and then use software to reduce noise. I use Noise Filter in Photoshop Elements 20 for my editing and have good results.

Feb 20, 2021 07:44:19   #
rattydaddy Loc: Harisburg, NC
 
I started with a T2-i, used it for a couple years. It was a nice little starter. But I just couldn't get the shots I wanted so I moved up to a Canon 7d I. Loved it. I used it mostly for sports, landscaping, & some low light. Got a couple low end off brand lens. After few years I felt I was still missing on some photos. Upgraded to the Holy Trinity lens (not all at once), Then a 50mm 1.4 & later 100mm Macro. Then a few years ago I purchased a 5D IV, its by far the best upgrade I've done. I now mess around with all kinds of photograph. I still miss on some shots but nothing like I was before. My point is I have upgraded over the years as I can afford it, but my camera upgrade has been by far the best of them. The full frame made a huge difference. Lens make a big difference get the best glass that you can afford. And go have some fun.

 
 
Feb 20, 2021 08:27:04   #
BuckeyeBilly Loc: St. Petersburg, FL
 
CHG_CANON wrote:
Your T5i features an older generation of 18MP sensors that were the Canon standard for cameras in 2010 to 2014. These cameras were challenged above say ISO-1600 without the use of flash and / or faster lenses to hold that ISO at ISO-1600 or lower.

That said, are you shooting in RAW and "exposing to the right" in your current work? Do you have an example JPEG you can post as a reply that shows the problems and actual low-light situations you encounter today? There may be opportunities in your technique or choice of lenses that will have a bigger impact before defaulting to a new camera.
Your T5i features an older generation of 18MP sens... (show quote)


👍👍Look up the name Steve Winter, who happens to be a National Geographic photographer. His specialty is taking photos of big cats, like tigers and so forth. There is an article on the NG website that features Winter and his work. His primary camera used for that article was the T5i with no manipulation of the camera. Beautiful and amazing! The point is, try using better and different lenses, faster ones.

Feb 20, 2021 09:01:50   #
imagemeister Loc: Stuart, Florida
 
greger wrote:
hi, I use a canon t5i. what would be a good canon camera for good low light performance? would I need to go full frame? I do have a couple ef lenes.
thanks


Coming from a 60D, I have been very impressed with the 80D. I cannot imagine that with smaller pixels that the 90D could be "better" ... - but maybe ?? - as the 80D has smaller pixels than the 60D !

If you are truly serious about noise ( I assume we are primarily talking about noise here ?) , yes, FF is the way to go - BUT, you will need bigger glass to maintain your fields of view. However, with "low light performance" we could also be talking about AF - in which case a faster lens comes into play.
.

Feb 20, 2021 09:41:04   #
jeep_daddy Loc: Prescott AZ
 
greger wrote:
hi, I use a canon t5i. what would be a good canon camera for good low light performance? would I need to go full frame? I do have a couple ef lenes.
thanks


The price of a new camera will correlate almost exactly with how well it handle taking photos in low light. Keep in mind, there is no camera out there that is perfect in low light. For example, I had a Canon 7D which introduced noise at ISO400. It wasn't bad, but I always tried to keep it below that for perfect pictures. When I upgraded to the 7D II, it handled ISO400 easily and I could actually go up as high as ISO640 with very little noise. The 5D IV could go up to ISO800 and did well. But any camera is going to have quite a lot of noise at ISO3200 and above. But keep in mind, you can use software to get rid of most of the noise.

Feb 20, 2021 10:58:33   #
Picture Taker Loc: Michigan Thumb
 
Now with you growing, man a point to buy only full frame lenses as you can grow full frame with out replacing any of them.

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