Ugly Hedgehog - Photography Forum
Mirrorless Camera or DSLR
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Feb 17, 2021 12:36:43   #
bcharrison
 
I am thinking about buying a Canon R5 or R6.
I currently own a Canon EOS 6d. I have researched both Rs.

I wanted to get input from people who have switched to these mirrorless cameras, or stayed with the DSLR camera that they have. If they bought another camera, would they buy a mirrorless camera or stay with DSLR?

Thanks.

barb

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Feb 17, 2021 12:42:24   #
ORpilot Loc: Prineville, Or
 
Not a Canon person but my 2 cents is to keep the 6d and get the mirrorless. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain.

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Feb 17, 2021 12:58:50   #
CHG_CANON Loc: the Windy City
 
Barb, what do you want to accomplish? What lenses do you have already? Do you plan to sell the EF and replace with RF versions?

The R5 would be a major jump in pixel resolution and file sizes. Have you considered any possible upgrade needs for computer equipment and storage?

The R6 would be no change of pixel resolution, staying at 20MP. You'll pick-up the many modern mirrorless features of the R6, but not more pixels for printing and / or cropping deep into the details.

If you keep the DSLR, why? What would two cameras with only partial lens compatibility accomplish / support for your photography needs.

The grass is always greener when captured with a mirrorless camera.

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Feb 17, 2021 13:09:07   #
ShelbyDave Loc: Lone Rock, WI
 
I recently switched from Canon 50D to Sony A7iii, and am so glad I did. The reduction of noise at higher ISO is one of the main reasons I decided to get a new camera. I was not disappointed, that alone makes it worthwhile for me. But then all of the other benefits keep adding up. Focus peaking, back button focusing, 24 megapixels. Those are just a few that I can think of at the moment. The only disadvantage I have encountered is because the sensor sits out in the open more, it does need cleaning more often. But that isn't the problem some people make it out to be. I have the Visible Dust Arctic Butterfly cleaning system which makes cleaning the sensor easy. For me, switching was definitely the right thing to do.

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Feb 17, 2021 13:35:40   #
Leitz Loc: Solms
 
bcharrison wrote:
I am thinking about buying a Canon R5 or R6.
I currently own a Canon EOS 6d. I have researched both Rs.

I wanted to get input from people who have switched to these mirrorless cameras, or stayed with the DSLR camera that they have. If they bought another camera, would they buy a mirrorless camera or stay with DSLR?

Thanks.

barb

If what I've been reading here on the UHH the past couple of years is any indication, mirrorless cameras are preferred by women and decrepit old men. Rather than copy others, I encourage you to think for yourself.

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Feb 17, 2021 13:55:49   #
Ysarex
 
bcharrison wrote:
I am thinking about buying a Canon R5 or R6.
I currently own a Canon EOS 6d. I have researched both Rs.

I wanted to get input from people who have switched to these mirrorless cameras, or stayed with the DSLR camera that they have. If they bought another camera, would they buy a mirrorless camera or stay with DSLR?

Thanks.

barb


I switched to mirrorless some 1/2 dozen years ago and now all of my cameras are mirrorless. I can make a couple observations:

Overall I'm happier than not for the switch and would do it again. I switched to get smaller and lighter and over all. I did get smaller and lighter but it may not be as big a change as it first seems. Mirrorless makes the camera smaller but not the lenses.

Biggest plus for me: Mirrorless cameras reduce the sensor to flange distance substantially. This means I can put just about anything in the way of lenses on my cameras and I do. One of my favorite macro lenses is a 60mm Rodagon enlarging lens. I like wide angle lenses and that mirrorless flange distance allows for better wide lenses because they don't have to be designed to clear the mirror. This is enough for me to call it an overall positive change. I have some wide lenses that couldn't be used on an SLR.

Biggest minus for me: I want my OVF back! Half a dozen years later and I still want my OVF back. I miss it and as much as I've adjusted to the camera's EVFs they're not the same and I'd much rather look through the camera and see what's there rather than see an electronic interpretation of what's there. I will never entirely adjust to the loss of an OVF.

Another plus however with the EVF is focus peaking. It goes hand in hand with the various manual lenses I use. The EVF can magnify the image for precise focus.

Another mirrorless minus worth noting: Seems like I'm always charging batteries. When I shot with my SLR I didn't consider it a basic requirement to have multiple spare batteries and always be sure they were charged. I was accustomed to taking out the SLR and using it all day on a battery charge. Now I have a drawer pretty much dedicated to a collection of chargers and batteries that I'm always charging.

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Feb 17, 2021 14:38:57   #
twosummers
 
I moved from the EOS 6D (which I loved) to the EOS R - which I love just a bit more (and it's the future). The EVF is a terrific advantage too. I considered the R6 (the R5 is just too much and an expensive card) but I'm now happy with the very robust R

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Feb 17, 2021 14:39:37   #
wdross Loc: Castle Rock, Colorado
 
bcharrison wrote:
I am thinking about buying a Canon R5 or R6.
I currently own a Canon EOS 6d. I have researched both Rs.

I wanted to get input from people who have switched to these mirrorless cameras, or stayed with the DSLR camera that they have. If they bought another camera, would they buy a mirrorless camera or stay with DSLR?

Thanks.

barb


I went from film Olympus, Canon, and Hasselblad straight to mirrorless Olympus and have never regretted doing so. I still hope to get a digital back for my Hasselblad. I made the switch once Olympus advertised the original E-M5 covered with water (it was a weatherproof and dustproof camera and is still being used by my grandson today). My system's present reach is 14mm to 840mm (in 35mm angle of view) and weights just slightly over 10 pounds (lenses, body, flashes, batteries, filters, viewsight, and a small handmeter; no tripod needed although I own a very good 2.5 pound carbonfiber tripod). Please note; I still have the Olympus and Hasselblad film cameras and lenses (the Olympus film lenses can be used on my 4/3rds system).

But in your case, I would not suggest selling off your original system without a proper reason for doing so. I would add to your system by buying a R5 or R6 along with any required adapters. Until weight and size becomes a factor, use what you have since it will be the least costly option.

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Feb 17, 2021 14:56:51   #
jdmiles Loc: Texas
 
I have had a R5 for less than 2 weeks and I have been amazed how much more effective I can be compared to the 5dIV. The 5.7m viewfinder is great which is more than the 2.1m screen. The ability to see the RGB histogram of the image before snapping is great. The ability to review images in the viewfinder is great. The 6X and 15X magnification inside the viewfinder is also great. The wireless connection works great. In manual mode, I have 3 dedicated controls for A, T, and ISO. Never thought about these before buying so I am very happy.

I think the noise level is probably better than the 5DIV but I haven't had a chance to compare.

The reason I got it was to allow me to keep shooting because my hands are not as steady at 72. From the test I have done so far, I can shoot at least 2 stops lower than the rule 1/focal_len.

I tried one test at 1/20, 70mm, f5, ISO 100 with my EF24-70 f4L. I shot my bookcase and included the room ceiling light (close to camera) pic. The light is covered in white cotton to keep the light muted. I exposed to the right to avoid clipping the light. In Lightroom I pulled the exposure up 4 stops to get the bookcase looking normal. Highlight control brought the room light back into non clipping. Acceptable noise in the dark areas. I compared sharpening in Lightroom to Topaz DeNoise AI. Topaz was better.

Auto focusing is great. The focusing zones on the 5DIV did not cover the whole screen like the 5R.

Face tracking has not been tried in any detail, but I have one try. 70-200 2.8 EF, 2X extender, EF-RF adapter. At 400mm f5.6, 1/30, ISO12800, focusing nailed cats' eye.

I can't see having just on EF-RF adapter. I get nervous when I leave the camera exposed without a lens or cap.

There is a lot to like. There were so many positive surprises I don't want to be negative at all.

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Feb 17, 2021 15:25:44   #
mcmama
 
I have the Nikon Z6 and absolutely love it. No regrets.

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Feb 18, 2021 05:33:36   #
f8lee Loc: New Mexico
 
bcharrison wrote:
I am thinking about buying a Canon R5 or R6.
I currently own a Canon EOS 6d. I have researched both Rs.

I wanted to get input from people who have switched to these mirrorless cameras, or stayed with the DSLR camera that they have. If they bought another camera, would they buy a mirrorless camera or stay with DSLR?

Thanks.

barb


I think @Ysarix has iterated the major pros and cons of mirrorless (I switched from DSLR to mirrorless about 6 years ago as well) - and simply wanted to add that if you haven't actually held a mirrorless model you really need to do that.

Forget spec sheets - the most important factor is ergonomics - how well if "fits" your body (and eye). What he said about the OVF is true for me as well - that's why I kept my DSLR with a 200MM macro lens - even with focus peaking the mirrorless pales in comparison to an optical viewfinder. However, when I have mentioned this (very obvious to me) difference before, other folks claim they cannot tell a difference.

The point is, no matter how well meaning people are in trying to give you their thoughts, without actually testing the mirrorless you are, well, flying blind.

Perhaps it will be worthwhile to rent a mirrorless for a week and live with it to see how YOU like it.

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Feb 18, 2021 05:57:04   #
w00dy4012 Loc: Thalia, East Virginia
 
bcharrison wrote:
I am thinking about buying a Canon R5 or R6.
I currently own a Canon EOS 6d. I have researched both Rs.

I wanted to get input from people who have switched to these mirrorless cameras, or stayed with the DSLR camera that they have. If they bought another camera, would they buy a mirrorless camera or stay with DSLR?

Thanks.

barb


Which do you prefer? Do you need a new camera, or just want a new camera?

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Feb 18, 2021 06:02:46   #
Peterfiore Loc: Eastern PA
 
w00dy4012 wrote:
Do you need a new camera, or just want a new camera?



Much of life is the want, not so much the need.

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Feb 18, 2021 07:12:41   #
billnikon Loc: Pennsylvania/Ohio/Florida/Maui/Oregon/Vermont
 
Leitz wrote:
If what I've been reading here on the UHH the past couple of years is any indication, mirrorless cameras are preferred by women and decrepit old men. Rather than copy others, I encourage you to think for yourself.


decrepit? Please explain this slur.

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Feb 18, 2021 07:28:21   #
Capn_Dave
 
CHG_CANON wrote:
Barb, what do you want to accomplish? What lenses do you have already? Do you plan to sell the EF and replace with RF versions?

The R5 would be a major jump in pixel resolution and file sizes. Have you considered any possible upgrade needs for computer equipment and storage?

The R6 would be no change of pixel resolution, staying at 20MP. You'll pick-up the many modern mirrorless features of the R6, but not more pixels for printing and / or cropping deep into the details.

If you keep the DSLR, why? What would two cameras with only partial lens compatibility accomplish / support for your photography needs.

The grass is always greener when captured with a mirrorless camera.
Barb, what do you want to accomplish? What lenses ... (show quote)


CHG_CANON usually have very good information, however this time, altho correct the information is not complete. I am a wildlife photographer, and I was fortunate to get to try out both the R5 and the R6, thank you Canon. I really never was a fan of mirrorless until I tried them. old Electronic View Finders lagged after you pushed the shutter button and many times you would miss the shot. Not with these two cameras. The EVF doesn't black out when shooting it stays lit The auto focus is amazing on both these cameras, better than anything else I have ever used Canon jumped ahead of everybody with these two beasts. Sorry Sony. As for lenses with the adapter you can use all of your old Canon lenses and they will be as sharp as they will allow. Internal stabilization coupled with lens stabilization I can hand hold an eight hundred mm lens and get sharp focus. I ended up buying the R6. Only 20 mp but the sensor is reported to be the same amazing sensor as the 1DX and it has the same processor to boot. I usually advocate to invest in glass not cameras. Being a wildlife photographer I normally use the Canon 7D and the 7D MKll. Here is a full frame camera with a magnesium frame that focuses on the eye of wildlife and keeps focus, shoots up to 20 Frames Per Second, has great video, Both the R5 and R6 are amazing machines.

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