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Oct 4, 2012 15:30:12   #
sarge69
 
I'm lazy so here's what I would have done.

Take the picture the second time BUT

Focus on the child and when it's done, don't press the button the rest of the way, tell the child to blow the bubbles and THEN press the rest of the way. She's in focus and bubble are within the DOF.

Sarge69

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Oct 4, 2012 15:30:23   #
sarge69
 
I'm lazy so here's what I would have done.

Take the picture the second time BUT

Focus on the child and when it's done, don't press the button the rest of the way, tell the child to blow the bubbles and THEN press the rest of the way. She's in focus and bubble are within the DOF.

Sarge69

| Reply
Oct 4, 2012 20:30:45   #
Wabbit (suspended)
 
SheenaghGebhard wrote:
Thanks to you all and to you TK - I've just checked it in Piccaso and this is what it says......EOS 7D, 1/1250s, focal length 52.0mm, f/6.3, ISO 400. Would that translate that I had set the shutter speed fast because the kids were moving and the day was bright and then the camera set the rest automatically? I think I might have been experimenting with Tv Shutter priority. If you were shooting photographing moving objects on a bright sun shiny day and you wanted to try something otherthan auto, what would you suggest would capture the best images, TV (shutter) priority or Av (apeture) priority. Apologies again for such a basic question!
Thanks to you all and to you TK - I've just checke... (show quote)


Eh Doc ..... to answer your question, when photographing moving subjects TV (shutter) priority would be your best bet.

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Oct 5, 2012 05:42:38   #
Theo_cupent42
 
I think the easiest solution is to change the focus point manually. Unless I'm doing sports, I like to have control of the focal point, so I keep it on manual and adjust it as I go. It'd become second nature, and it works really well.

I personally think the problem in the photo is negligible - its such a beautiful photo, and you really know what you're doing with the composition.

Just my 2ยข...

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Oct 5, 2012 05:47:52   #
farmerjim
 
Sheenagh, that's a great pic and I'd be well happy with it, like others say, the bubbles are perfect and the little girl is soft with the background out of focus. It works well.
FYI, with your camera and settings ie. Canon 7D, 52mm and f6.3 The DOF at 10 feet is between 8.8ft and 11.5ft [2.5 feet] and at 20 feet it's between 15.8ft and 27.4ft [11.6 feet]
So stand back would give you DOF and bring the girl into sharp focus BUT it would spoil the pic IMHO!

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Oct 5, 2012 06:05:18   #
Forest Squirrel
 
Great photo, if you use Picassa as suggested (this is a free download from Google) right click on your image then scroll down and click on Properties a mass of camera info will then appear

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Oct 5, 2012 06:09:14   #
john merry
 
great photo nice out of focus background great camara all looks good to me

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Oct 5, 2012 06:12:38   #
johna800
 
DOF or Depth of Field refers to the area of focus behind and infront of the subject your primary focus point is on. DOF is mainly controlled by the F/Stop setting.

The DOF is controlled by the F/Stop.

The bigger your F/Stop number is the larger your DOF becomes.
The smaller your F/Stop equates to the smaller your DOF becomes. Quick reference: F/2.8 ='s small DOF, F/16 and up ='s greater DOF.

Shutter speed (S/S) has very little to do with DOF. However, S/S does affect DOF when you are using very long S/S such as when you are using a "B" Bulb type setting or a very long exposure, say a 2min exposure. Nevertheless, S/S in general does not affect DOF when your exposure is under 1min exposure.

In your picture of the girl with bubbles it is visually evident your DOF is just a bit narrow so as to capture both the bubbles and the young girls face in sharp focus. (Bubbles are sharp, Girl's face is slightly out of sharp focus.)

Not knowing the F/Stop you used for this photo makes it difficult to nail the answer on the head. However, it is safe to say that based on the image, you are only .5 to 1 stops from nailing the area of focus you desire.

Example: If you used, let us say, F/11 to snap the image, then you should increase your DOF by changing your F/Stop from F/11 to F/11 - F/16 or one full stop to F/16. That adjustment should now capture the bubbles and the girl's face in sharp focus.

Keep in mind the following: F/Stops provide adjustment not only between whole numbers printed on the adjustment ring, such as from F/11 to F/16 or from F/11 to F/8.

F/Stops are also functional at all points between noted/printed numbers. An example would be setting your F/Stop manually toF/11-F/16 or F/11-F/8. These settings would represent HALF F/Stop adjustments. Quarter adjustments are also available via F/Stops when setting them manually.

Also, use of a hand-held light meter, not the light meter located in the camera, will assist you in easier nailing of your exposures if you so desire. As for knowing the DOF of any lens at a given F/Stop will be found in the techinical data for the lens being used.

Further, on a related topic, data for each image you create digitally normally is captured in the EXIF data with the image. This information can be seen by using BRIDGE or other available software used to view your image data. You can search the web and download a free copy of this particular type of sofware to your computer. You may want to become familiar with this type of software for future reference and use.

Good Shooting,
JohnA

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Oct 5, 2012 06:14:15   #
thehing
 
SheenaghGebhard wrote:
I'm sorry to ask such a dumb question, but after trawling through many questions and answers regarding, depth of field, apeture, ISO settings etc., I don't even know where you find the information that tells you the settings your photo was taken on in order to address the problem in the image! The attached photo has the bubbles in focus but the child is blurred. I think this is because my DOF is too short? Can someone tell me where I can find the info on the picture so I could maybe begin to figure out how I could have taken them both in focus? I am in the process of organising some tutoring so the technical jargon of F stops, ISO and apeture do not remain what currently might as well be "Swahili"
I'm sorry to ask such a dumb question, but after t... (show quote)

If you are using windows just right click on the photo, click on properties, click on details and scroll down to see all the settings that the camera used for the picture.

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Oct 5, 2012 06:36:36   #
gwong1
 
Here is a website that you can visit to obtain lots of information. I have the 7D as well, a great camera. Best of luck, and by the way I love the picture you posted, a very cute little girl. Gary http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/understanding-series/
SheenaghGebhard wrote:
I'm sorry to ask such a dumb question, but after trawling through many questions and answers regarding, depth of field, apeture, ISO settings etc., I don't even know where you find the information that tells you the settings your photo was taken on in order to address the problem in the image! The attached photo has the bubbles in focus but the child is blurred. I think this is because my DOF is too short? Can someone tell me where I can find the info on the picture so I could maybe begin to figure out how I could have taken them both in focus? I am in the process of organising some tutoring so the technical jargon of F stops, ISO and apeture do not remain what currently might as well be "Swahili"
I'm sorry to ask such a dumb question, but after t... (show quote)

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Oct 5, 2012 06:51:22   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
SheenaghGebhard wrote:
I'm sorry to ask such a dumb question, but after trawling through many questions and answers regarding, depth of field, apeture, ISO settings etc., I don't even know where you find the information that tells you the settings your photo was taken on in order to address the problem in the image! The attached photo has the bubbles in focus but the child is blurred. I think this is because my DOF is too short? Can someone tell me where I can find the info on the picture so I could maybe begin to figure out how I could have taken them both in focus? I am in the process of organising some tutoring so the technical jargon of F stops, ISO and apeture do not remain what currently might as well be "Swahili"
I'm sorry to ask such a dumb question, but after t... (show quote)

Nice image. I like the effect of focusing on the bubbles. With a longer lens, FX camera, and larger aperture, you could have had the bubbles in sharp focus, but the girls' face blurred more. That would have given a nice effect.

I've been playing with SLRs for forty years, so I've absorbed quite a bit of terminology. Be patient, and in about thirty years, it will all begin to make sense. :D

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Oct 5, 2012 06:58:16   #
Nic42
 
I agree with Sarge; plus I would suggest keeping the Aperture at 6.3 or lower (5.6). If you use an Aperture smaller than this (F8+) the background will detract from the image. The photo is about the little girl and bubbles, not what is behind her.

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Oct 5, 2012 07:07:47   #
RacerDan
 
tramsey wrote:
Ugly Hedge Hog rule #8: Do not apologize for any question if the answer is not known. Please ask another, maybe I'll learn something to.

Frankly I don't see anything wrong with the photo. You have bubbles in focus, the girl is just slightly out of focus but nothing serious, lighting is great, compotion could be changed just a little but I think its a really good shot. What a beautiful little girl.


you must watch NCIS

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Oct 5, 2012 07:13:03   #
Pentony
 
SheenaghGebhard wrote:
Thanks to you all and to you TK - I've just checked it in Piccaso and this is what it says......EOS 7D, 1/1250s, focal length 52.0mm, f/6.3, ISO 400. Would that translate that I had set the shutter speed fast because the kids were moving and the day was bright and then the camera set the rest automatically? I think I might have been experimenting with Tv Shutter priority. If you were shooting photographing moving objects on a bright sun shiny day and you wanted to try something otherthan auto, what would you suggest would capture the best images, TV (shutter) priority or Av (apeture) priority. Apologies again for such a basic question!
Thanks to you all and to you TK - I've just checke... (show quote)


1. No need to apologize for asking questions. No question is "dumb." Always ask questions. Anyone who tries to put you down for asking any question, that person is ignorant.
2. You never said what type; brand and model, camera you're using. Knowing your camera type may preclude you from having to do any post processing (PP) and give you specific responses.

| Reply
Oct 5, 2012 07:13:52   #
Pentony
 
SheenaghGebhard wrote:
Thanks to you all and to you TK - I've just checked it in Piccaso and this is what it says......EOS 7D, 1/1250s, focal length 52.0mm, f/6.3, ISO 400. Would that translate that I had set the shutter speed fast because the kids were moving and the day was bright and then the camera set the rest automatically? I think I might have been experimenting with Tv Shutter priority. If you were shooting photographing moving objects on a bright sun shiny day and you wanted to try something otherthan auto, what would you suggest would capture the best images, TV (shutter) priority or Av (apeture) priority. Apologies again for such a basic question!
Thanks to you all and to you TK - I've just checke... (show quote)


1. No need to apologize for asking questions. No question is "dumb." Always ask questions. Anyone who tries to put you down for asking any question, that person is ignorant.
2. You never said what type; brand and model, camera you're using. Knowing your camera type may preclude you from having to do any post processing (PP) and give you specific responses.

| Reply
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