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Nov 4, 2020 23:11:46   #
Xmsmn Loc: Minnesota
 
Equipment: Olympus EM10 Mk3, 14-42 mm kit lens at 25mm, Manual mode, MF setting, with tripod. So here is my very flawed attempt at night photography, somewhat the best of the worst, trying to capture a (nearly) full moon shining on railroad tracks. The intent was: small but distinct moon, treeline framing the reflection on the tracks to infinity, and if I got very lucky, some visibility on the railroad ties. In hindsight I should have shot b&w but that’s not the big issue. I got the tracks, some ties/tie clips visibility and a very hazy moon, which the real thing was not. I moved all over the place with aperture, speed and ISO (this one is a noisy 2500). Where did I go wrong? (the list is probably long) I didn’t think of it until home that I possibly could have used the multiple exposure feature on the camera but I don’t know if I could combine 2 shots with very different exposures in-camera.


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Nov 4, 2020 23:16:28   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
I would have metered the moon and increased the exposure a slight bit. Then, in processing you'd probably have enough to work with in bringing details out in the darker areas.

I do like the concept.
--Bob
Xmsmn wrote:
Equipment: Olympus EM10 Mk3, 14-42 mm kit lens at 25mm, Manual mode, MF setting, with tripod. So here is my very flawed attempt at night photography, somewhat the best of the worst, trying to capture a (nearly) full moon shining on railroad tracks. The intent was: small but distinct moon, treeline framing the reflection on the tracks to infinity, and if I got very lucky, some visibility on the railroad ties. In hindsight I should have shot b&w but that’s not the big issue. I got the tracks, some ties/tie clips visibility and a very hazy moon, which the real thing was not. I moved all over the place with aperture, speed and ISO (this one is a noisy 2500). Where did I go wrong? (the list is probably long) I didn’t think of it until home that I possibly could have used the multiple exposure feature on the camera but I don’t know if I could combine 2 shots with very different exposures in-camera.
Equipment: Olympus EM10 Mk3, 14-42 mm kit lens at ... (show quote)

Nov 4, 2020 23:19:25   #
hoola
 
Moody . I like that . Wish though that moon were fully visable & lower . Also maybe try a bit of flash(maybe even coloured) to light up tracks .

 
 
Nov 4, 2020 23:38:37   #
Ourspolair
 
I would have made two exposures - one for the Moon, the other to get the tracks right, then done a photo merge (like HDR).

Nov 4, 2020 23:43:03   #
Xmsmn Loc: Minnesota
 
rmalarz wrote:
I would have metered the moon and increased the exposure a slight bit. Then, in processing you'd probably have enough to work with in bringing details out in the darker areas.

I do like the concept.
--Bob


Thanks for your comments. I’ll give that a try, maybe before the moon wanes more this week.
Mark

Nov 4, 2020 23:46:11   #
Xmsmn Loc: Minnesota
 
hoola wrote:
Moody . I like that . Wish though that moon were fully visable & lower . Also maybe try a bit of flash(maybe even coloured) to light up tracks .


Thanks for your comments. I was expecting it to be lower too, maybe next month as we get further into winter. As it was, I didn’t pay enough attention to the moonrise and angle, and ended up spending 2 hours waiting in the dark. At least it was unseasonably warm.
Mark

Nov 4, 2020 23:49:26   #
Xmsmn Loc: Minnesota
 
Ourspolair wrote:
I would have made two exposures - one for the Moon, the other to get the tracks right, then done a photo merge (like HDR).


Thanks for your comments. Unless we get a stretch of butt-chilling cold weather I’m going to add that to the list of things to try in my next attempt, both in-camera and in pp.
Mark

 
 
Nov 5, 2020 01:26:28   #
rgrenaderphoto Loc: Hollywood, CA
 
Xmsmn wrote:
Equipment: Olympus EM10 Mk3, 14-42 mm kit lens at 25mm, Manual mode, MF setting, with tripod. So here is my very flawed attempt at night photography, somewhat the best of the worst, trying to capture a (nearly) full moon shining on railroad tracks. The intent was: small but distinct moon, treeline framing the reflection on the tracks to infinity, and if I got very lucky, some visibility on the railroad ties. In hindsight I should have shot b&w but that’s not the big issue. I got the tracks, some ties/tie clips visibility and a very hazy moon, which the real thing was not. I moved all over the place with aperture, speed and ISO (this one is a noisy 2500). Where did I go wrong? (the list is probably long) I didn’t think of it until home that I possibly could have used the multiple exposure feature on the camera but I don’t know if I could combine 2 shots with very different exposures in-camera.
Equipment: Olympus EM10 Mk3, 14-42 mm kit lens at ... (show quote)


The easiest (relative) way to achieve this is to create two images, one for the tracks, the other for the moon, and combine them together in different layers in Photoshop.

Nov 5, 2020 06:07:34   #
wireloose
 
Standard exposure for the moon is likely to be somewhere around iso100, f8, 1/250, it’s very bright, so I Think you can see why everyone is saying to combine two images.

Nov 5, 2020 08:16:35   #
Xmsmn Loc: Minnesota
 
rgrenaderphoto wrote:
The easiest (relative) way to achieve this is to create two images, one for the tracks, the other for the moon, and combine them together in different layers in Photoshop.


Thanks for your comments. Sounds like the voice of experience.
Mark

Nov 5, 2020 08:22:38   #
Xmsmn Loc: Minnesota
 
wireloose wrote:
Standard exposure for the moon is likely to be somewhere around iso100, f8, 1/250, it’s very bright, so I Think you can see why everyone is saying to combine two images.


Thanks for your comments. I looked up the data on a more successful full moon image from last winter and turns out the settings were dang close to those. Iso 250, f8, 1/250. Quite bright but would have worked here. Gotta link my memory with my fingers...

 
 
Nov 5, 2020 17:38:59   #
fotogk Loc: Tuftonboro, NH
 
Give this a look should help out https://www.naturettl.com/how-to-photograph-the-moon-with-foreground/

Nov 5, 2020 17:44:30   #
Xmsmn Loc: Minnesota
 
fotogk wrote:


Thanks for the link. Good information, some similar to what other hogs have said, plus some good add-on links.
Mark

Nov 6, 2020 13:21:35   #
captivecookie
 
I've heard the secret to night photography is to often avoid full night. Taking night shots with just a tad bit of light still in the sky helps even out your exposure latitude and all that neat stuff.

Also consider..
Long lens to compress perspective. Moving your point of view lower to the tracks to put the moon and the tracks closer.

Who knows, maybe prayer wouldn't hurt either.

Nov 6, 2020 14:30:47   #
Xmsmn Loc: Minnesota
 
captivecookie wrote:
I've heard the secret to night photography is to often avoid full night. Taking night shots with just a tad bit of light still in the sky helps even out your exposure latitude and all that neat stuff.

Also consider..
Long lens to compress perspective. Moving your point of view lower to the tracks to put the moon and the tracks closer.

Who knows, maybe prayer wouldn't hurt either.


Thanks for your comments. With the shot planned to take advantage of (what I thought would be) a low angle of the moon and this particular line of tracks. Well, by the time the moon was in position it was dark+60 and the angle was too high to capture the moon “sitting on” the tracks. The shot I posted was at 25 mm; I tried several at 40 mm but couldn’t get both in the frame. If I pursue the merged image route I would probably overlay a 50 mm moon on this 25 mm landscape. Or find a similar set of tracks on a better compass heading for moonrise.
I haven’t given up on the prayer method either.
Mark

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