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Is the problem 1600 ISO or something else?
Oct 31, 2020 09:12:31   #
genocolo Loc: Vail and Gasparilla Island
 
Just trying BIF. Any help would be appreciated. Canon 80D with 100-400L lens.


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Oct 31, 2020 09:18:16   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
I'm interested in reading the comments to follow.
--Bob
genocolo wrote:
Just trying BIF. Any help would be appreciated. Canon 80D with 100-400L lens.

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Oct 31, 2020 09:28:49   #
lamiaceae Loc: San Luis Obispo County, CA
 
genocolo wrote:
Just trying BIF. Any help would be appreciated. Canon 80D with 100-400L lens.


What is wrong with it, the hot spot on the torso? Looks like the contrast and saturation are set too high. And yet under exposed. You think ISO 1600 is a high ISO? It is only 3 stops above my standard ISO 200 for general shots. Yes, a bit soft too, that lens is sharper than that. What f/ and shutter speed were you using? I'm on my phone, it is not set up for meta data viewing. You may have needed a higher shutter speed, 1/800 s or higher. Did you have Shake control on? Shoot RAW and tweek it in PP. For a Natural look average settings are likely best for nature photography.

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Oct 31, 2020 09:37:14   #
mikeroetex Loc: Lafayette, LA
 
genocolo wrote:
Just trying BIF. Any help would be appreciated. Canon 80D with 100-400L lens.

Looks more like, too slow a shutter speed or you just simply missed focus. Could also be cropped way too tight. Need more details for accurate assessment. I assume you were not far away since you are only 124mm on a 100-400 lens.

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Oct 31, 2020 09:37:22   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
To me, it looks soft or out of focus, not noisy. Perhaps a focus issue? And how was the image processed? Any sharpening? My EXIF viewer is showing 124mm (?) - is that correct, and if so, why not a longer FL instead of cropping? Btw, what focusing mode and what were the individual settings? I would definitely suggest AI Servo. Finally, if we’re mine, I would check the focus with a target and correct or have corrected as needed. All that said, I am not a BIF maven, so interested to see what the pros say...

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Oct 31, 2020 09:46:17   #
genocolo Loc: Vail and Gasparilla Island
 
F/6.3 1/1250 handheld.

I saw him flash in the sunlight and did not have time to get out to 400. These guys are fast! Used small focus group—next up from single point.

You are right it was a tight crop. Other than crop, this was straight out of camera, I believe.

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Oct 31, 2020 09:53:05   #
Ourspolair
 
So - how far away was the bird? I suspect that you should be using a longer lens and at least f8 to give you better DOF, and that the issue is mostly the crop. I don't see anything in focus - generally single-point focus is used for birds and focusing is on the eye. 1/1250s is adequate for a large bird in flight. I will let the BIF experts fill you in, but that would be my starting point if I were trying to capture a bird in flight.

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Oct 31, 2020 10:02:57   #
tomcat
 
genocolo wrote:
Just trying BIF. Any help would be appreciated. Canon 80D with 100-400L lens.


All I can say is to practice on moving cars first, so you can learn to focus on a moving object and be able to follow/track it. Make sure your camera is set for continuous focus (not sure what it's called on a Canon) and a shutter speed of no slower than 1/1,000 sec. Focus here is definitely off.

Go to Steve Perry's website and read his tips for shooting wildlife. He shoots Nikons, but the tips are the same. Once you read his site and understand, you may want to purchase a D500. That's what I use for birds and outdoor sports.

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Oct 31, 2020 17:32:21   #
Grahame Loc: Fiji
 
genocolo wrote:
Just trying BIF. Any help would be appreciated. Canon 80D with 100-400L lens.


Does you Canon software indicate where your focus point was?

I'm also intrigued at how you have a very dark sky with what appears the bird being lit from the underside.

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Oct 31, 2020 17:41:51   #
genocolo Loc: Vail and Gasparilla Island
 
May have been the polarizing filter?

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Oct 31, 2020 18:43:45   #
via the lens Loc: Northern California, near Yosemite NP
 
Many others have commented on the image. So, I'll comment in general on, "Just trying BIF. Any help would be appreciated."

Shooting BIF is about skill as well as equipment. Practice helps to get better. It also helps, if you are hand-holding, to have steady hands and knowledge of how to brace yourself as you shoot to help stay steady. I have photographed a lot of wildlife and my normal aperture setting is f/5.6. This is not just because my lenses are mostly f/5.6 lenses, but because that aperture will get the majority of a bird in focus but still allow for a soft background. If there is time you can experiment with different aperture settings based on your distance but so far f/5.6 has delivered for me. The Steve Perry info is good and he will tell you to set the camera on auto-ISO and in manual, which means you need to stay aware of the settings as you shoot but the aperture and shutter will stay the same no matter what. The only problem with this type of setting is you might end up taking images at much higher ISOs than you need to, so that is why you need to stay aware. In general, your shutter needs to be at a setting of 1000, but most often much higher than that, maybe 2500. This setting will allow you to get the bird's eyes sharp as it moves through the sky. For hummers you need around 3500, but understand that everything is variable depending on the setting. If you use a tripod you need gear that will allow you to move the camera/lens effortlessly as you track the bird, there are several options you can research. Good lighting helps a lot, of course, and determining where the light is coming from and what you want out of the shot ahead of time helps a lot, too. Moving the focus point to the bird's eye/head area is important unless you're just hoping to center everything. Read your camera manual on which focus settings are best. Leave more room in front of the bird than behind the bird unless you know how to work with your software, assuming you process, after the fact. The bird's position and size (how fast the bird moves) will also affect your shot and you'll learn this by experience. That's just a few things to consider as learn how to do this. Read the Steve Perry info. He is a very good wildlife photographer (I've shot with him) and you will learn a lot by reading his info or watching his videos. Then practice over and over again.

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Nov 1, 2020 08:29:29   #
genocolo Loc: Vail and Gasparilla Island
 
Thanks to everyone who has shared their expertise and experience. I also watched Steve Perry’s excellent video on BIF and learned a lot. Now, as you say, I need to practice.

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Nov 1, 2020 13:22:40   #
Don, the 2nd son Loc: Crowded Florida
 
genocolo wrote:
Just trying BIF. Any help would be appreciated. Canon 80D with 100-400L lens.


I've had similar results with 60D and 7Dii and 400mm f/5.6L. Significant improvement was achieved when I made sure IS was OFF (recommended at 1/640th and up ) Also, when I "snap" a shot as you did the quick push on the shutter button doesn't give the camera enough split seconds to grab sharp focus, I get "almost there" focus instead. So, I now use 1/2000 or more, f'6.3 is fine, IS= OFF, squeeze the button. Practice on everything that moves quickly. Get some weird expressions from drivers when shooting highway traffic LOL!

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Nov 1, 2020 13:23:57   #
Don, the 2nd son Loc: Crowded Florida
 
Don, the 2nd son wrote:
I've had similar results with 60D and 7Dii and 400mm f/5.6L. Significant improvement was achieved when I made sure IS was OFF (recommended at 1/640th and up ) Also, when I "snap" a shot as you did the quick push on the shutter button doesn't give the camera enough split seconds to grab sharp focus, I get "almost there" focus instead. So, I now use 1/2000 or more, f'6.3 is fine, IS= OFF, squeeze the button. Practice on everything that moves quickly. Get some weird expressions from drivers when shooting highway traffic LOL!
I've had similar results with 60D and 7Dii and 400... (show quote)


IS referred to is with my 300mm f4L. 400/5.6L has no IS.

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