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Help with Moon Photo
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Oct 2, 2020 12:42:25   #
qasas3251 Loc: Shippensburg, PA
 
I have been photo graphing the Moon and I can't seem to get the full Moon as sharp as I want. For some reason the Crescent Moon or Half Moon are ok. Of course I would like them sharper but for now I'm happy with them. I shot both with the same gear, the camera was a Cannon 7D, with a Cannon 150-600 MM lens. Any comments critiques or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks All and please stay safe.

First Photo Data: 3/4 Moon

Cannon: EOS 7D
F-Stop: f/6.3
Exposure time: 1/1250 sec.
ISO: ISO-800
Focal Length:600MM
Max aperture: 5.25
Metering Spot

Second Photo Data: Full Moon

Cannon: EOS 7D
F-Stop: f/6.3
Exposure Time: 1/800
ISO: ISO-400
Focal Length:600MM
Max aperture: 5.25
Metering Spot


(Download)


(Download)

Oct 2, 2020 12:53:09   #
PixelStan77 Loc: Vermont/Chicago
 
qasas3251 wrote:
I have been photo graphing the Moon and I can't seem to get the full Moon as sharp as I want. For some reason the Crescent Moon or Half Moon are ok. Of course I would like them sharper but for now I'm happy with them. I shot both with the same gear, the camera was a Cannon 7D, with a Cannon 150-600 MM lens. Any comments critiques or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks All and please stay safe.

First Photo Data: 3/4 Moon

Cannon: EOS 7D
F-Stop: f/6.3
Exposure time: 1/1250 sec.
ISO: ISO-800
Focal Length:600MM
Max aperture: 5.25
Metering Spot

Second Photo Data: Full Moon

Cannon: EOS 7D
F-Stop: f/6.3
Exposure Time: 1/800
ISO: ISO-400
Focal Length:600MM
Max aperture: 5.25
Metering Spot
I have been photo graphing the Moon and I can't se... (show quote)


I think the zoom is moving after you focus. Suggest a piece of tape on zoom and focus.

Oct 2, 2020 14:01:37   #
qasas3251 Loc: Shippensburg, PA
 
Thanks I'll give it a try. The thing that is frustrating is the shots I've take of the partial moon are fine. It is only the full moo I'm having an issue with. I was thinking it might be a lighting issue.

 
 
Oct 2, 2020 21:59:35   #
PoppieJ Loc: North Georgia
 
it might be because the full moon does not have the contrast that a partial moon has. The full moon has the sun hitting it straight on to our viewpoint so it is like taking photos in high noon.

Oct 2, 2020 22:24:49   #
qasas3251 Loc: Shippensburg, PA
 
I think your right also I'm starting to think the time that I shot it might have a little to do with it. I shot just after it rose a little above the horizon. That would increase the amount of atmosphere. I there was any haze it could be part of the problem. Thanks for the reply, I do appreciate it.

Oct 3, 2020 07:56:13   #
ClarkJohnson Loc: Fort Myers, FL and Cohasset, MA
 
I’ve come to think that images of the full moon are boring for the contrast reasons mentioned by PoppieJ. However, you do have to adjust your settings a bit to accommodate the brightness of the full moon. Maybe underexpose a little and see what you can bring up in PP?

Oct 3, 2020 10:21:20   #
qasas3251 Loc: Shippensburg, PA
 
I was out last night again waiting until the moon was over head instead of low on the horizon. I do believe you gentlemen are correct that its a contrast issue. I did try bracketing my shots but it made very little diffrence. I'm thinking of trying focus stacking using my telescope, any thoughts or recommendations?

 
 
Oct 3, 2020 10:54:33   #
Jaackil Loc: Massachusetts
 
qasas3251 wrote:
I have been photo graphing the Moon and I can't seem to get the full Moon as sharp as I want. For some reason the Crescent Moon or Half Moon are ok. Of course I would like them sharper but for now I'm happy with them. I shot both with the same gear, the camera was a Cannon 7D, with a Cannon 150-600 MM lens. Any comments critiques or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks All and please stay safe.

First Photo Data: 3/4 Moon

Cannon: EOS 7D
F-Stop: f/6.3
Exposure time: 1/1250 sec.
ISO: ISO-800
Focal Length:600MM
Max aperture: 5.25
Metering Spot

Second Photo Data: Full Moon

Cannon: EOS 7D
F-Stop: f/6.3
Exposure Time: 1/800
ISO: ISO-400
Focal Length:600MM
Max aperture: 5.25
Metering Spot
I have been photo graphing the Moon and I can't se... (show quote)


Getting a sharp full moon with detail and contrast is extremely difficult in a single shot. First it is extremely bright. Brighter than you even realize. Partial moons reflect much less light. The other reason is depth of field issues. The moon is not a flat disk. It is a round sphere so if you focus on the middle as you move away from the middle it gets further and further away from you plane of focus. The best way to shoot a full moon is to stack several exposures to bring back detail and contrast.
Good luck.

Oct 3, 2020 11:07:39   #
alberio Loc: Colorado
 
Jaackil wrote:
Getting a sharp full moon with detail and contrast is extremely difficult in a single shot. First it is extremely bright. Brighter than you even realize. Partial moons reflect much less light. The other reason is depth of field issues. The moon is not a flat disk. It is a round sphere so if you focus on the middle as you move away from the middle it gets further and further away from you plane of focus. The best way to shoot a full moon is to stack several exposures to bring back detail and contrast.
Good luck.
Getting a sharp full moon with detail and contrast... (show quote)


Excellent response.

Oct 3, 2020 12:40:46   #
letmedance Loc: Walnut, Ca.
 
alberio wrote:
Excellent response.


The full moon has no shadows, The partial moon has distinct shadows.

Oct 3, 2020 13:45:26   #
qasas3251 Loc: Shippensburg, PA
 
When you talk about stacking are you talking about using HDR?

Thanks for thevreply and the advice!

 
 
Oct 3, 2020 14:05:15   #
letmedance Loc: Walnut, Ca.
 
qasas3251 wrote:
When you talk about stacking are you talking about using HDR?

Thanks for thevreply and the advice!


It cannot be a depth of field problem, the moon is at infinity ,a bright star in the background lightyears away would be sharp.

Oct 3, 2020 15:17:20   #
qasas3251 Loc: Shippensburg, PA
 
I think what so frustrating to me is, when I 'm looking through the camera I can see the detail. The focus is sharp and crisp. And although very small I can see the detail of the craters. I guess I just learned that the camera does not always see what the eyes do. Ok folks thanks for all the ideas and help. If I figure something out I'll definitely post it.

Please stay safe.
Steve

Oct 3, 2020 15:53:20   #
letmedance Loc: Walnut, Ca.
 
The lack of shadow From the surface of the full moon creates what i call a flat picture. Tonight and tomorrow night shadows should start to appear near the inner surface that is dark. It really makes a big difference if want some contrast and sharpness. I generally use spot metering on the brightest area. .

Oct 3, 2020 18:12:28   #
alberio Loc: Colorado
 
qasas3251 wrote:
I think what so frustrating to me is, when I 'm looking through the camera I can see the detail. The focus is sharp and crisp. And although very small I can see the detail of the craters. I guess I just learned that the camera does not always see what the eyes do. Ok folks thanks for all the ideas and help. If I figure something out I'll definitely post it.

Please stay safe.
Steve


Our eyes tend to compensate for poor "seeing conditions" or turbulence in the atmosphere. When a camera takes a shot it captures either the distorted or perfect view at that second. If you were to look at Jupiter at 200x you would think it was under a river of water if the atmosphere is not steady. The best skies will have stars that aren't twinkling...steady as a rock. The moon will display the same views because it is still dependent on looking through our atmosphere. That is why the accepted method for moon and planetary imagery is video running through a alignment/stacking program to reduce the number of poor quality exposures.
It is very rare to get a single perfectly focused shot of the moon. Yes it does matter about the depth of field. Try looking through a telescope, focused at the edge craters and you will find the center craters will not be as sharp or visa versa. If you focus on the moon and zoom in tightly on the stars they will not be truly in focus.

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