Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Need Recommendations for a New Camera
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Aug 1, 2020 10:59:26   #
Toment Loc: IL-FL
 
FreddB wrote:
B&H HAS rebel t7i for $699 (body only)


πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘

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Aug 1, 2020 11:18:28   #
charlienow Loc: Hershey, PA
 
koratcat wrote:
A friend's daughter has asked me for a recommendation for replacing her 12-year-old Canon Rebel xs, so I'm turning to my favorite resource for things photographic: UHH members.

She takes lots of pictures of her kids, and her price range is $600-$700. She's open to other brands as well as to Canon. Of course, if she stays with Canon, she probably could use her current 18-55 mm lens on the new camera and spend some of her budget on one of their 55-250mm lenses to gain more zoom range.

Any suggestions/recommendations you folks have would be appreciated.
A friend's daughter has asked me for a recommendat... (show quote)


It seems like she isn’t looking to upgrade to a higher level camera and is mostly interested in taking family photographs. Maybe vacations.

Costco has a nice bundle with a t7, 18-55 and I think a 70-300 zoom. A bag. Etc. it is 500

That’s online.

I think I store they have another bundle up from that. Still in her budget I think.

They used to have a couple of Nikon bundles but I haven’t seen Nikon in the store for awhile.

Costco has a liberal return policy and for not a lot of money you can buy a very good extended warranty which adds a couple years to the warranty and covers spills and drops.

Look forward to hearing what she decides to do

Chuck

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Aug 1, 2020 11:51:38   #
Architect1776 Loc: Williamsport Pa
 
koratcat wrote:
A friend's daughter has asked me for a recommendation for replacing her 12-year-old Canon Rebel xs, so I'm turning to my favorite resource for things photographic: UHH members.

She takes lots of pictures of her kids, and her price range is $600-$700. She's open to other brands as well as to Canon. Of course, if she stays with Canon, she probably could use her current 18-55 mm lens on the new camera and spend some of her budget on one of their 55-250mm lenses to gain more zoom range.

Any suggestions/recommendations you folks have would be appreciated.
A friend's daughter has asked me for a recommendat... (show quote)


The 90D hands down.
Pro level camera and will use her current lens.
Again, ALL EF and EF-S lenses work 100% with it and there are hundreds of wonderful gently used Canon lenses and NO worry about incompatibility ever.
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1502488-REG/canon_3616c016_eos_90d_dslr_camera.html
It has the best resolution, 32.5 mp, and one of the fastest Crop sensor cameras made.
With the exclusive DPAF, that NO other makers have, you get cinematic quality video that no one else in this class came come close to.
Finally if she goes to mirrorless ALL her EF and EF-S lenses are 100% compatible with Canon mirrorless cameras.

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Aug 1, 2020 16:38:55   #
MountainDave
 
[quote=Sidwalkastronomy][quote=MountainDave]The 77D was recently discontinued but some dealers still have them in stock. B&H still has them combined with the latest 18-135 lens for 799. This is a GREAT deal. The lens would be a big upgrade over the old 18-55 as well.[/quote

I'm wondering you got the information that 77d was discounted? over last weeks spoke to multiple canon reps and they said its not. Came out in 2017 so too early to stop it. The shortage might be supply chain issues due to covid. They just released the t8i
so its possible its discounted by why would canon deny that.. I was at B&H twice in last few weeks and they had a shortage of some tripods due to supply chain issues. 77D was made in Japan but some parts might be made in China.
please post the source of the discontinued info. I saw some web sites say that and some said out of stock. Canon denys it is[/quote]

It was heavily discounted a couple of months ago and then no longer available at the Canon store. They don't say "out of stock." B&H says the body is "unavailable" as opposed to "backorder" so I think it is gone. I suspect the 7ti far outsold it even though the 77D was IMO a much better camera and value, so the new 8ti and 90D made it expendable. Perhaps an "88D" is in the offing, but I doubt it. I'll admit, it is simply a deduction on my part, so we shall see.

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Aug 1, 2020 17:07:21   #
amfoto1 Loc: San Jose, Calif. USA
 
koratcat wrote:
A friend's daughter has asked me for a recommendation for replacing her 12-year-old Canon Rebel xs, so I'm turning to my favorite resource for things photographic: UHH members.

She takes lots of pictures of her kids, and her price range is $600-$700. She's open to other brands as well as to Canon. Of course, if she stays with Canon, she probably could use her current 18-55 mm lens on the new camera and spend some of her budget on one of their 55-250mm lenses to gain more zoom range.

Any suggestions/recommendations you folks have would be appreciated.
A friend's daughter has asked me for a recommendat... (show quote)


First, a 12 year old 18-55mm is quite possibly due for an update. There have been six or more versions of that lens... some pretty good... some not so much. The two latest versions are supposedly the best. Both of those are "STM" lenses, with faster, smoother, quieter AF. They both also have IS image stabilization. The difference is one is f/3.5 at the shortest focal length, while the newer is f/4. Both of them have non-rotating front barrels during focusing and zooming (a problem with most of the earlier 18-55 models, that made them difficult to use with filters like circular polarizers that are adjusted by turning part of the filter). The newer models also have noticeably better image quality.

It's more expensive, but the Canon EF-S 18-135mm might be a more practical single lens for someone with growing kids. As the kids get into sports, etc., she will likely want more than 55mm. The question then is, how much more. On any of the Canon cameras she's considering, 135mm is a fairly strong telephoto... But, of course, there are more powerful, though it will generally mean carrying two lenses and swapping them out at times. The two best, current EF-S 18-135mm lenses are the "STM" and the "USM". They are identical in image quality, using exactly the same optical formula (which is improved compared to earlier models). The difference between these two is that the more expensive USM model uses an "ultrasonic motor" that makes it faster focusing. Canon claims it's 2X to 4X faster focusing than the STM or "stepper motor" version. If her kids get into sports, she might want a faster focusing lens. That will work best when paired up with a camera that also has a higher performance AF system. Current and most recent Canon APS-C DSLRs AF systems compared: Best, 7D Mark II. 2nd best: 90D and T8i. 3rd best: 80D, 77D, T7i. 4th best: SL3, SL2, T7.

An alternative to the 18-135mm is to pair up the kit lens... 18-55mm... with a telephoto zoom. There are three of those typically offered "in kit" with cameras, at some discount. They are the EF-S 55-250mm IS II or STM and the EF 75-300mm III. The worst of these by far is the 75-300 III. It's Canon cheapest and worst telephoto zoom. It falls short in almost every measure... slow micro motor autofocus, not very close focusing, it lacks image stabilization and it has pretty poor image quality, especially at the 300mm end of its zoom range. Either of the 55-250mm lenses is noticeably better optically, closer focusing and image stabilized. The "STM" version is also faster, smoother, quieter focusing. A 55-250mm will typically cost $50 to $100 more than the 75-300mm, but is well worth the additional expense.

After deciding about lenses, shop for cameras. Some come in kit with both EF-S 18-55mm STM and EF-S 55-250mm STM, which is a great way to buy the lenses at a discount. Some of the more entry level models are only offered in kit with "lesser" lenses... non-STM versions of 18-55 and 55-250mmm or even with the 75-300 III substituted for the longer focal length zoom.

I wouldn't recommend the most entry level T7 model, which not only comes in kit with the cheapest and least capable lenses... it also has a fairly antiquated 9-point AF system (only one higher performance "dual axis, cross type AF point" a the center, much like was in cameras fifteen years ago)... and it lacks some important features that come on all other Canon DSLRs. For example, it doesn't have a self-cleaning sensor! It also doesn't have Flicker Free feature that helps with exposure under certain types of lighting (often found in gyms, offices, arenas). It even uses an early Digic 4 processor. Most of the other models use two to four generation newer.... some of the latest Canon models now even use five to six generation newer!

{Note: There is an even more entry-level model sold outside N. America, called something like a 4000D.... but that's not commonly found in the US. It suffers from the same short-comings.)

The SL2 and one year newer SL3 are very similar models. They are the most compact, lightweight DSLRs anyone makes. The SL3 has a few tweaks versus the SL2, mostly related to video. They are a strong step up from the T7 in almost every way.... except they use the same AF system. However, with much newer Digic processor that makes the SL2/SL3's AF system perform better. These two cameras are offered body only, or in a kit with the 18-55mm STM alone, or in a two-lens kit with both 18-55mm STM and 55-250mm STM. An 18-135mm is not typically offered in kit with these cameras.

The T7i and T8i are another step up. Note the "i" in the model designation. The T8i is the latest, primarily with enhanced video capabilities. These models are a bit larger and heavier than the ultra compact SL-series, plus have a much newer, more advanced, higher performance 45-point AF system. The EOS 77D is very similar to the T7i in most ways. It has some additional controls and a second LCD screen on the top, right shoulder. Regardless of it's model name, in its specification it's still a Rebel series model, like the T8i, T7i and earlier. In fact, the 77D superseded the Rebel T6s model.

80D and 90D are the next step up. These are Canon's more mid-grade DSLR models. They have 100%, true pentaprism viewfinders... versus the slightly cropped (~95%), penta-mirror used in all the lower models. The pentaprism adds some weight and cost, but makes for a bigger, brighter viewfinder. The 90D is the latest and greatest Canon APS-C model... and the highest resolution camera of that format by far, with 32.5MP. Most other APS-C format DSLRs, including 80D, 77D, T7i, have 24MP at best. In fact, the 90D has higher resolution that many full frame cameras, including all but two Canon. Such high resolution demands top quality lenses. That super high resolution will really show the short-comings of anything less.

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Aug 1, 2020 17:53:51   #
revhen Loc: By the beautiful Hudson
 
I could sell you a 70D with 18-135 STM for $650 + shipping. PM me if interested.

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Aug 1, 2020 18:01:58   #
DeanS Loc: Capital City area of North Carolina
 
Take a look at the Cano SL3. A very nice, small, lightweight, full featured little job. She won't be disappointed.

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Aug 1, 2020 18:54:20   #
dwmoar
 
Shoeless_Photographer wrote:
You are correct. The 75-300mm lens is not stabilized.


Introduced in 1991, the Canon EF 75–300mm f/4–5.6 lens is a telephoto zoom lens for Canon EOS single-lens reflex cameras with an EF lens mount. There are 3 basic types of the lens: the IS USM (Image Stabilization, Ultra Sonic Motor), the USM (USM, no IS) and non-USM (no USM, no IS). All 3 types are generally considered to be low-end consumer-level lenses.

The Canon EF 75–300mm f/4–5.6 IS USM Lens was Canon's first Image Stabilized lens. Even with IS it is considered a consumer-grade lens.

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Aug 1, 2020 20:59:32   #
Gifted One Loc: S. E. Idaho
 
dwmoar wrote:
Introduced in 1991, the Canon EF 75–300mm f/4–5.6 lens is a telephoto zoom lens for Canon EOS single-lens reflex cameras with an EF lens mount. There are 3 basic types of the lens: the IS USM (Image Stabilization, Ultra Sonic Motor), the USM (USM, no IS) and non-USM (no USM, no IS). All 3 types are generally considered to be low-end consumer-level lenses.

The Canon EF 75–300mm f/4–5.6 IS USM Lens was Canon's first Image Stabilized lens. Even with IS it is considered a consumer-grade lens.
Introduced in 1991, the Canon EF 75–300mm f/4–5.6 ... (show quote)


My opinion only! I am a long time Canon shooter (Ftb). Everyone is can make a mistake. To continue to make a mistake is a sin. Canon I believe should be convicted for crimes against humanity by still producing this lens.

Just me, J. R.

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Aug 1, 2020 21:08:20   #
koratcat
 
amfoto1 wrote:
First, a 12 year old 18-55mm is quite possibly due for an update. There have been six or more versions of that lens...


Thanks for all the detailed info re lenses and the comparisons you included about the auto-focus systems.

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Aug 1, 2020 23:20:23   #
imagemeister Loc: Stuart, Florida
 
PHRubin wrote:
Another choice is the Canon EOS Rebel SL3 DSLR. However, the 80D is a better camera if you can get one in your price range. B&H as well as Canon offer reconditioned ones.


As mentioned previously, the SL2 is cheaper and you do not give up much performance. If you can afford it, I would pass on the Canon kit lenses and get the Sigma 17-70 2.8-4 instead.....or the Canon 18-135 (latest).
.

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Aug 1, 2020 23:20:39   #
pottermr
 
My recommendation price and performance wise is the Canon EOS M50. You can often get a super buy on a Canon refurbished model. It has lens compatibility with other Canon DSLRs when you use the EF/EFS lens converter (I use the canon model, but there are a number of cheaper non oem models that seem very good), it is smaller and lighter, but just as capable as the larger DSLR models with the same size crop sensor as the other Canons recommended. Great pictures indoors with just ambient light are capable with this camera (important for family pics). A reconditioned M50 from Canon and either the lens converter or an additional lens is within her price window. Biggest issue is limited set of native lenses, but the converter opens up a plethora of both Canon and non-oem lenses for the this camera. Read the reviews on this camera. If you make the choice to choose this camera, you won't regret it.

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Aug 1, 2020 23:51:22   #
jdub82 Loc: California
 
Sidwalkastronomy wrote:
the problem with ebay is you don't know if its grey market. From that photo that's not the charger I got with mine. I don't know how they know the shutter count. called canon and they couldn't tell me how to find shutter count.


If buying a Canon camera used, why would it really matter if it is grey market? The difference is the U.S. warranty, and the used body off ebay will not come with a warranty anyway. However, I would pay close attention to see if the accessories are the genuine factory supplied accessories, such as the battery and charger.

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Aug 1, 2020 23:54:56   #
Gifted One Loc: S. E. Idaho
 
jdub82 wrote:
If buying a Canon camera used, why would it really matter if it is grey market? The difference is the U.S. warranty, and the used body off of ebay will not come with a warranty anyway.


Canon does not have a transferability of warranty. Canon does do repair of Grey goods at market price. So jdub you would in my opinion be correct. When buying Canon product used I am not concerned about Grey goods issues.

J. R.

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Aug 2, 2020 00:02:27   #
Sidwalkastronomy Loc: New Jersey Shore
 
if its grey will have different charger and battery. I had some issues with after market batteries shooting eclipse so I spend the extra dollars and get canon battery.
I'm not a fan of ebay with private sellers.

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