Ugly Hedgehog - Photography Forum
Why do photos have orange tint?
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Jul 6, 2020 13:25:21   #
SoftLights Loc: New Orleans, LA
 
I recently shot some pictures in a church with white balance set at Auto, Normal. The pictures had a orange tint that didn't change even when switching to other WB settings. I have another project coming up in the same church and would like to eliminate the orange cast all together. Any help would be much appreciated.


(Download)

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Jul 6, 2020 13:26:40   #
jerryc41 Loc: Catskill Mts of NY
 
The next person to reply is going to ask you to post some examples and check the box for (store original).

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Jul 6, 2020 13:26:58   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
Could you post a photo so I can see the tint? There's a variety of possibilities as to what is causing that. Oh, and which processing software you're using.

addendum- Jerry, I probably don't need to see the 'download' version.
--Bob

SoftLights wrote:
I recently shot some pictures in a church with white balance set at Auto, Normal. The pictures had a orange tint that didn't change even when switching to other WB settings. I have another project coming up in the same church and would like to eliminate the orange cast all together. Any help would be much appreciated.

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Jul 6, 2020 13:31:56   #
R.G. Loc: Scotland
 
It's possible the ambient light has an orange tint that you don't notice when you're there because your eye adjusts to it when you view it first-hand (difficult to tell without an example).

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Jul 6, 2020 13:37:04   #
SoftLights Loc: New Orleans, LA
 
I can correct using a 82 cooling filter in photoshop CC but would like to avoid the color cast all together. The church is new and I'm not sure what kind of lights, LED, CFL or what. I used a Nikon D-7200 set at Auto WB.
Is the image still not visible? Thanks for your input, very much appreciated.

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Jul 6, 2020 13:38:01   #
Bushpilot Loc: Minnesota
 
One of the nice things about Lightroom, just move the Temperature slider slightly left, and all is good.

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Jul 6, 2020 13:39:50   #
SoftLights Loc: New Orleans, LA
 
R.G., that is correct. The orange tint is not noticeable inside the church. It's just barely noticeable when viewing on lcd but really pots out when loaded into PS. Thanks again all.

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Jul 6, 2020 13:45:38   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
Which software do you use?
--Bob
SoftLights wrote:
I recently shot some pictures in a church with white balance set at Auto, Normal. The pictures had a orange tint that didn't change even when switching to other WB settings. I have another project coming up in the same church and would like to eliminate the orange cast all together. Any help would be much appreciated.

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Jul 6, 2020 13:47:12   #
JohnSwanda Loc: San Francisco
 
Check your camera manual for setting a custom WB.

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Jul 6, 2020 13:51:08   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
Something like this?
--Bob
SoftLights wrote:
I recently shot some pictures in a church with white balance set at Auto, Normal. The pictures had a orange tint that didn't change even when switching to other WB settings. I have another project coming up in the same church and would like to eliminate the orange cast all together. Any help would be much appreciated.


(Download)
or this
or this...
(Download)

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Jul 6, 2020 13:54:08   #
larryepage
 
SoftLights wrote:
I recently shot some pictures in a church with white balance set at Auto, Normal. The pictures had a orange tint that didn't change even when switching to other WB settings. I have another project coming up in the same church and would like to eliminate the orange cast all together. Any help would be much appreciated.


Our church sanctuary has a mix of lighting...incandescent, fluorescent, halogen, and LED. Despite the mix, the overall effect is fine to the human eye, except for the few isolated areas in a couple of corners where someone insists on continuing to use "Cool White" fluorescent lamps to save money. I have photographed several presentations and events there, and initially had a similar experience to yours. I took the opportunity to spend some time in the room and discovered that the actual overall color temperature of the lighting was between 2800K and 2900K. None of the 'packaged' white balance settings reach far enough to properly correct for that extreme an environment. I could only do it by setting the Kelvin temperature. I suggest that if your camera offers that option, that you use that as a starting point, then experiment. Many cameras then have a second adjustment to correct for "tint." That is usually a somewhat limited adjustment on an axis that moves between green and violet. I've not yet been in a situation where that was necessary.

Now I realize that I am almost all alone here, but one white balance solution that I have learned never to use, especially in a situation like this, is "Auto." The main reason for this is that Auto White Balance (AWB) does not do what everyone thinks it does, and what it does do can produce some really creepy results...images like you might have seen on "The Addams Family." if it had been in color. Since your camera has no way to know what you are shooting at any given moment, and since your camera really lacks much insight, all AWB can really do it make adjustments that bring the three color histograms all on top of one another. It's a little more complicated than that, but not much. So if a shot is full of a crowd of people wearing blue clothing, your camera is going to shift toward yellow. In a shot with lots of yellow walls, it is going to shift toward blue. And it is probably going to result in different results when the room fills up with people versus when it is empty. Fixed settings will not do that.

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Jul 6, 2020 13:58:41   #
R.G. Loc: Scotland
 
My suggestion would be to shoot raw and adjust in PP.

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Jul 6, 2020 14:00:11   #
Kozan Loc: Trenton Tennessee
 
SoftLights wrote:
I recently shot some pictures in a church with white balance set at Auto, Normal. The pictures had a orange tint that didn't change even when switching to other WB settings. I have another project coming up in the same church and would like to eliminate the orange cast all together. Any help would be much appreciated.


You can set the color temperature lower to say, 3400 K. Or just do a custom white balance. It takes less than 30 seconds to do it once you learn how. One way to get the correct white balance is to just shoot your hand (with the camera, not a gun) and see if it looks natural. As long as something white looks white, you are all set.

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Jul 6, 2020 14:24:11   #
DirtFarmer Loc: Way too close to New York City
 
IMHO, raw is the best solution. It allows complete freedom to change the white balance to anything possible in post. Lightroom has an automatic white correction in the develop module. You take the eyedropper and click it on something that should be white.

What it does is take the R, G, and B channels at that point and adjusts the temperature and tint to make them equal. That makes them a neutral color.

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Jul 6, 2020 14:32:11   #
CHG_CANON Loc: the Windy City
 
We ascribe to cameras remarkable powers and insight. These images are a typical outcome in mixed indoor lighting for most / all cameras. Leaving on AUTO WB and shooting in RAW and correctly later offers the best approach. You can dial-in whatever K temperature and tint, as needed to correct. Using a white card in the actual light works, as well as custom a WB, using a few techniques, including the white card.

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