Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Darkling Beetle
Jun 28, 2020 19:07:14   #
sippyjug104 Loc: Missouri
 
This is a new acquisition from the Bill (newtoyou) collection so a big thanks goes out to him for his support of my passion of photographing and sharing.

I believe to be a beetle of the Darkling Family. This little rascal is so small that I had to put a touch of superglue on the tip of a #000 mounting pin to stage it for the camera. That alone was a true test of my ability of staging and to keep the glue from sticking to anything and anywhere that it wanted to. This is a focus stacked image.


(Download)

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Jun 28, 2020 19:47:03   #
newtoyou Loc: Eastport
 
sippyjug104 wrote:
This is a new acquisition from the Bill (newtoyou) collection so a big thanks goes out to him for his support of my passion of photographing and sharing.

I believe to be a beetle of the Darkling Family. This little rascal is so small that I had to put a touch of superglue on the tip of a #000 mounting pin to stage it for the camera. That alone was a true test of my ability of staging and to keep the glue from sticking to anything and anywhere that it wanted to. This is a focus stacked image.
This is a new acquisition from the Bill (newtoyou)... (show quote)


Gary.
I have a duplicate of the 3x5 card I sent you.
Refer to letter or number when posting.
These may have been in Roman numeral one.
No matter.
They are indeed in the family Tenebrionidae.
When in a mass as I found them they smell strongly of tannic acid, which I find pleasing.
These feed on fungi and mycellium. Common under loose bark in mass of 100 or so sometimes.
Not only a nice shot, but a good ID.
One starts to see family relationships.
I could do these blindfolded, no pun or cliche.
Bill

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Jun 28, 2020 19:58:16   #
sippyjug104 Loc: Missouri
 
newtoyou wrote:
Gary.
I have a duplicate of the 3x5 card I sent you.
Refer to letter or number when posting.
These may have been in Roman numeral one.
No matter.
They are indeed in the family Tenebrionidae.
When in a mass as I found them they smell strongly of tannic acid, which I find pleasing.
These feed on fungi and mycellium. Common under loose bark in mass of 100 or so sometimes.
Not only a nice shot, but a good ID.
One starts to see family relationships.
I could do these blindfolded, no pun or cliche.
Bill
Gary. br I have a duplicate of the 3x5 card I sent... (show quote)


Thanks ever so much for your support, Bill. They were in the container Roman Numeral One and I used the card ID to find the Family. I surely could not have done it without your help labeling them. These are ever so small so the magnification of the session is 8X power to bring out the details.

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Jun 28, 2020 20:38:49   #
kpmac Loc: Ragley, La
 
Another really nice one, sippy.

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Jun 28, 2020 20:51:21   #
sippyjug104 Loc: Missouri
 
kpmac wrote:
Another really nice one, sippy.


Thanks, Kpmac. Mounting this little bugger for the session was the difficult part.

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Jun 29, 2020 07:44:18   #
docshark Loc: Long Neck, DE
 
This is a great one Gary. As always I love the DL and the DDL. Different eye shape. You'd probably never notice it without your macro shot.
-Doc

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Jun 29, 2020 10:26:53   #
sippyjug104 Loc: Missouri
 
docshark wrote:
This is a great one Gary. As always I love the DL and the DDL. Different eye shape. You'd probably never notice it without your macro shot.
-Doc


Thanks, Doc. Anytime that I stage a subject about the size of a grain of rice is quite challenging. Often times I can't tell the front end from the back end until I view it under magnification. The ones that I can't get a #000 mounting pin into have to be staged in a different manner and I use the Super Glue method as a last resort for I end up getting it stuck to me more often than I do the pin.

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Jun 29, 2020 12:07:41   #
napabob Loc: Napa CA
 
sippyjug104 wrote:
Thanks, Doc. Anytime that I stage a subject about the size of a grain of rice is quite challenging. Often times I can't tell the front end from the back end until I view it under magnification. The ones that I can't get a #000 mounting pin into have to be staged in a different manner and I use the Super Glue method as a last resort for I end up getting it stuck to me more often than I do the pin.


another nice stack, and I can see how difficult it is to wrangle them into positions preferred, another step in your process you successfully pull off regularly ...........

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Jun 29, 2020 14:16:44   #
raymondh Loc: Walker, MI
 

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Jun 29, 2020 14:43:02   #
docshark Loc: Long Neck, DE
 
sippyjug104 wrote:
Thanks, Doc. Anytime that I stage a subject about the size of a grain of rice is quite challenging. Often times I can't tell the front end from the back end until I view it under magnification. The ones that I can't get a #000 mounting pin into have to be staged in a different manner and I use the Super Glue method as a last resort for I end up getting it stuck to me more often than I do the pin.


Your continued experimentation is making your phots exceptional as well as making it easier for all of the other Hoggers that want to try their hand at this amazing art form.
-Doc

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Jun 29, 2020 17:13:34   #
sippyjug104 Loc: Missouri
 
napabob wrote:
another nice stack, and I can see how difficult it is to wrangle them into positions preferred, another step in your process you successfully pull off regularly ...........


Thanks, Napabob. The larger the specimen the much easier it is to position it for the camera. When it is about the size of a grain of rice and then stand it on its end you can imagine how the slightest touch to rotate it moves it what appears to be miles.

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Jun 29, 2020 17:13:54   #
sippyjug104 Loc: Missouri
 
raymondh wrote:


Thanks for viewing and the reply.

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Jul 1, 2020 13:25:15   #
newtoyou Loc: Eastport
 
sippyjug104 wrote:
Thanks, Doc. Anytime that I stage a subject about the size of a grain of rice is quite challenging. Often times I can't tell the front end from the back end until I view it under magnification. The ones that I can't get a #000 mounting pin into have to be staged in a different manner and I use the Super Glue method as a last resort for I end up getting it stuck to me more often than I do the pin.


I have thought on this problem a bit.
Superglue is the wrong choice.
I use clear Aerogloss dope, or clear nail polish.
It can be reversed with a bit of acetone.
Dip a small insect pin HEAD into the dope. Allow to gel. Touch specimen on your chosen spot. Position as dope dries.
I have 99 cent ball joints with a small alligator clip to hold pin.
The dope also is the ideal thing to replace broken appendages.
If you look close, you can see how it holds bark mounted beetles I sent, to the bark. A drop on the tarsi.
I had a 4 oz jar, lasted almost 45 years.
I did gratis mounting work for a lady for a PhD thesis.
I enjoy it, and it helped her a great deal.
She is now Dr.(I have forgotten).
The technique of artistic mounting is another dinosaur.
That you accomplish this well in a short time shows a 'natural' talent.
Knowledge of insect physiology will enhance the skill.
Thanks, Gary.
Bill

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