Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Green Herron paid an unexpected visit to my Koi pond.
Page: 1 2 next>>
May 8, 2020 22:22:50   #
jaysnave Loc: Central Ohio
 
Probably left with a few of them.


(Download)


(Download)

| Reply
May 8, 2020 22:32:12   #
BamaTexan Loc: Deep in the heart of Texas
 
Excellent captures!

| Reply
May 8, 2020 23:12:01   #
quixdraw Loc: American Free States -- Montana
 
You might want to consider putting some mesh over the pond for a while - even though they like smaller fish (and other stuff) do love my Koi. Good photos, BTW!

| Reply
May 9, 2020 09:25:55   #
jaysnave Loc: Central Ohio
 
quixdraw wrote:
You might want to consider putting some mesh over the pond for a while - even though they like smaller fish (and other stuff) do love my Koi. Good photos, BTW!


I have had this pond for 15 yrs. and have been waging war against various koi predators the entire time. Blue Herons have been the major problem. I have used a mesh covering which does work except it is horrible for the esthetics of the pond. Over time it would catch leaves and other debris and fall into the pond, also covering the water lilies. I have used an oscillating sprinkler head with a motion sensor, but you have to keep it on and change the battery frequently. The best solution was staking fishing line around the pond. That worked well as fish eating birds with long legs walk into the pond and the fishing line freaks them out and they fly away. However, after all this and my koi were growing large a mink (yes a mink I have pictures) came through and wiped all of them out. There is no defense as they swim into the pond and just feast away. I have resolved to just stock the pond with small koi when there is a sale and or fancy goldfish.

| Reply
May 9, 2020 10:32:16   #
kpmac Loc: Ragley, La
 
Outstanding.

| Reply
May 9, 2020 10:46:50   #
quixdraw Loc: American Free States -- Montana
 
Our pond is deep, as all except the first have been, so wading isn't an issue. I figured we might have problems out in the country, but none for the last dozen years. I have a roll of a relatively coarse black plastic fence material that isn't too bad visually - no leaves here to worry about. Haven't had to use it here. We do use the motion detector sprayers - works a treat for keeping deer out of the flower garden - ours are solar. We have a very good Koi source - can't call the name to mind. When my Wife gets back, I'll PM it to you. Reasonable for high quality small fish.

| Reply
May 9, 2020 10:53:20   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
jaysnave wrote:
I have had this pond for 15 yrs. and have been waging war against various koi predators the entire time. Blue Herons have been the major problem. I have used a mesh covering which does work except it is horrible for the esthetics of the pond. Over time it would catch leaves and other debris and fall into the pond, also covering the water lilies. I have used an oscillating sprinkler head with a motion sensor, but you have to keep it on and change the battery frequently. The best solution was staking fishing line around the pond. That worked well as fish eating birds with long legs walk into the pond and the fishing line freaks them out and they fly away. However, after all this and my koi were growing large a mink (yes a mink I have pictures) came through and wiped all of them out. There is no defense as they swim into the pond and just feast away. I have resolved to just stock the pond with small koi when there is a sale and or fancy goldfish.
I have had this pond for 15 yrs. and have been wag... (show quote)


Having tried all the methods you mention above to protect my pond from Herons, I have found that:
a) the netting is effective, but, as you say, unaesthetic. However a Heron managed to stick his beak through it and kill one of my largest Koi (maybe 5-6 lbs), but couldn’t get him out to eat him.
b) the monofilament works pretty well - visible, but not as bad as the netting.
c) the sprinkler with the infrared sensor (called a scarecrow) is effective for some bids, but not others, but excellent at soaking you or you friends when you forget it’s on. Unfortunately the ones I’ve bought which are $70-$80 only seem to last a year or two before dying.
d) my local fish store suggested a floating alligator head on a monofilament tether. They’re made of thick styrofoam, painted to look exactly like a gator, but obscenely expensive (~$40-$50) for a piece of styrofoam. The story is that a Heron recognizes the gator head and won’t go near it. Amazingly, it has worked very well except for one recent “visitor”, who apparently hadn’t gotten the message.
e) my latest plan, which I’m still considering, is to string a regular electric fence single wire around the perimeter about a foot off the ground, powered by a regular electric fence charger. Not pretty, but I’m betting it may be effective.

And even if you were willing to shoot such a majestic creature (I’m not) after he’s eaten your prize fish, don’t do it! There’s a huge Federal fine. A man I used to buy aquatic plants from had a neighbor that had outside ponds and raised Koi commercially. As the story goes, one day, having reached his limit, he shot a marauding Heron, who was able to fly up into a tall tree before expiring and whose dead carcass was hanging over a limb - too high to get down, but plainly visible if you looked up. Apparently, the shooter lived in mortal fear of the charge and the fine for a year or two, every time a wildlife officer came onto his property, until the carcass finally fell from the tree.

Good luck.

| Reply
May 9, 2020 11:25:40   #
fotobyferg Loc: New York, now in lower, slower De
 
Lovely!

| Reply
May 9, 2020 14:43:47   #
jaysnave Loc: Central Ohio
 
quixdraw wrote:
Our pond is deep, as all except the first have been, so wading isn't an issue. I figured we might have problems out in the country, but none for the last dozen years. I have a roll of a relatively coarse black plastic fence material that isn't too bad visually - no leaves here to worry about. Haven't had to use it here. We do use the motion detector sprayers - works a treat for keeping deer out of the flower garden - ours are solar. We have a very good Koi source - can't call the name to mind. When my Wife gets back, I'll PM it to you. Reasonable for high quality small fish.
Our pond is deep, as all except the first have bee... (show quote)


Thanks!

| Reply
May 9, 2020 14:59:57   #
jaysnave Loc: Central Ohio
 
TriX wrote:
Having tried all the methods you mention above to protect my pond from Herons, I have found that:
a) the netting is effective, but, as you say, unaesthetic. However a Heron managed to stick his beak through it and kill one of my largest Koi (maybe 5-6 lbs), but couldn’t get him out to eat him.
b) the monofilament works pretty well - visible, but not as bad as the netting.
c) the sprinkler with the infrared sensor (called a scarecrow) is effective for some bids, but not others, but excellent at soaking you or you friends when you forget it’s on. Unfortunately the ones I’ve bought which are $70-$80 only seem to last a year or two before dying.
d) my local fish store suggested a floating alligator head on a monofilament tether. They’re made of thick styrofoam, painted to look exactly like a gator, but obscenely expensive (~$40-$50) for a piece of styrofoam. The story is that a Heron recognizes the gator head and won’t go near it. Amazingly, it has worked very well except for one recent “visitor”, who apparently hadn’t gotten the message.
e) my latest plan, which I’m still considering, is to string a regular electric fence single wire around the perimeter about a foot off the ground, powered by a regular electric fence charger. Not pretty, but I’m betting it may be effective.

And even if you were willing to shoot such a majestic creature (I’m not) after he’s eaten your prize fish, don’t do it! There’s a huge Federal fine. A man I used to buy aquatic plants from had a neighbor that had outside ponds and raised Koi commercially. As the story goes, one day, having reached his limit, he shot a marauding Heron, who was able to fly up into a tall tree before expiring and whose dead carcass was hanging over a limb - too high to get down, but plainly visible if you looked up. Apparently, the shooter lived in mortal fear of the charge and the fine for a year or two, every time a wildlife officer came onto his property, until the carcass finally fell from the tree.

Good luck.
Having tried all the methods you mention above to ... (show quote)


Those are some great battle stories. The enemy that has defeated me looks like this. There is no defense. Maybe a foot high electric fence although I am pretty sure the grandkids would be playing with it.



| Reply
May 9, 2020 18:33:12   #
Bonnie Halsell Loc: Ocala, Florida USA
 
Excellent capture of the marauder. Sorry for the loss of your koi. We have a huge koi pond at work and I have seen the largest ones actually capture a duckling for a snack. Can't give you any advice on a solution.

Bonnie

| Reply
May 10, 2020 05:49:29   #
J-SPEIGHT Loc: Akron, Ohio
 
jaysnave wrote:
Probably left with a few of them.


Nice shots

| Reply
May 12, 2020 02:58:44   #
MDI Mainer Loc: Mount Desert, Maine
 
jaysnave wrote:
Those are some great battle stories. The enemy that has defeated me looks like this. There is no defense. Maybe a foot high electric fence although I am pretty sure the grandkids would be playing with it.


The top predator when I had fish pond in Virginia (keeping koi is illegal in Maine and anyway heating the pond in winter would be ruinous) was a raccoon.

The Scarecrow worked to save the fish from the neighborhood cats, (especially after I posted a note by the garden door reminding me to turn it off before I went outside) but eventually the raccoons would get used to it, jump into the water and wreck havoc with the plantings as they chased the fish.

The best remedy was to have the miscreant trapped and relocated by a pest control firm. This usually worked for about 6-9 months until a new critter took over the territory.

Once when I was visiting the National Arboretum in Washington, DC I was treated to the spectacle of one of the bald eagles resident in the park helping him or herself to a huge koi from the formal pond surrounding the main exhibition building.

| Reply
May 12, 2020 09:29:14   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
MDI Mainer wrote:
The top predator when I had fish pond in Virginia (keeping koi is illegal in Maine and anyway heating the pond in winter would be ruinous) was a raccoon.

The Scarecrow worked to save the fish from the neighborhood cats, (especially after I posted a note by the garden door reminding me to turn it off before I went outside) but eventually the raccoons would get used to it, jump into the water and wreck havoc with the plantings as they chased the fish.

The best remedy was to have the miscreant trapped and relocated by a pest control firm. This usually worked for about 6-9 months until a new critter took over the territory.

Once when I was visiting the National Arboretum in Washington, DC I was treated to the spectacle of one of the bald eagles resident in the park helping him or herself to a huge koi from the formal pond surrounding the main exhibition building.
The top predator when I had fish pond in Virginia ... (show quote)


Another answer to Raccoons is a deep pond with steep sides. Mine is 3-1/2’ deep with vertical sides (a converted in-ground swimming pool), and while they do come at night, caught on my motion activated camera, they never go in (except for the one that fell in by accident).

| Reply
May 12, 2020 11:24:33   #
MDI Mainer Loc: Mount Desert, Maine
 
TriX wrote:
Another answer to Raccoons is a deep pond with steep sides. Mine is 3-1/2’ deep with vertical sides (a converted in-ground swimming pool), and while they do come at night, caught on my motion activated camera, they never go in (except for the one that fell in by accident).


Mine was 3 feet deep, straight sides, but unfortunately the marginal plantings in tubs raised up on blocks near the surface gave the raccoons an easy entry and exit point (and a good playground)!

At least the holes in the cinder blocks gave the fish a good hiding place.

| Reply
Page: 1 2 next>>
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2020 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.