Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Iced Sandhill
Feb 26, 2020 11:23:27   #
Nalu Loc: Southern Arizona
 
I was going thru some older files I got at Bosque last December and found this that I found interesting. Not a great photo, taken before sunup with an ISO of 5000, but what I found of interest was the ice on the Sandhill's foot. For that ice to have formed, it means the bird had to have been stationary overnight long enough for it to have been able to form. The adaptation of these birds to withstand the cold temperatures in their feet and legs is pretty amazing to me, as compared to a human (some of my friends might debate whether I am human or not). What furthermore surprises me is that even though they can stand in freezing water for long periods of time, when they are airborne in cold weather, they tuck their legs and feet under their body apparently to keep them warmer. How can they go through overnight in freezing water, but demonstrate the behavior of trying to keep their feet warm while flying in cold temperatures? Maybe you ornithologists out there can share some information on this?


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Feb 26, 2020 11:39:55   #
Mustanger Loc: Grants Pass, Oregon USA
 
Never saw this before! Interesting! I have seen ducks frozen unharmed in the pond.

Maybe they tuck their feet for better aerodynamics in flight? I don't know.

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Feb 26, 2020 12:57:53   #
kpmac Loc: Ragley, La
 
That is new to me. But then I live in Louisiana. We don't get frozen ponds too often. (It does happen, though).

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Feb 26, 2020 13:17:15   #
Nalu Loc: Southern Arizona
 
Mustanger wrote:
Never saw this before! Interesting! I have seen ducks frozen unharmed in the pond.

Maybe they tuck their feet for better aerodynamics in flight? I don't know.


In normal flight Sandhills have their legs extended behind them. Thanks for looking and your comments.

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Feb 27, 2020 05:31:15   #
J-SPEIGHT Loc: Akron, Ohio
 
Nalu wrote:
I was going thru some older files I got at Bosque last December and found this that I found interesting. Not a great photo, taken before sunup with an ISO of 5000, but what I found of interest was the ice on the Sandhill's foot. For that ice to have formed, it means the bird had to have been stationary overnight long enough for it to have been able to form. The adaptation of these birds to withstand the cold temperatures in their feet and legs is pretty amazing to me, as compared to a human (some of my friends might debate whether I am human or not). What furthermore surprises me is that even though they can stand in freezing water for long periods of time, when they are airborne in cold weather, they tuck their legs and feet under their body apparently to keep them warmer. How can they go through overnight in freezing water, but demonstrate the behavior of trying to keep their feet warm while flying in cold temperatures? Maybe you ornithologists out there can share some information on this?
I was going thru some older files I got at Bosque ... (show quote)

Nice capture

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Feb 27, 2020 09:42:30   #
raymondh Loc: Walker, MI
 
Possibly a criminal crane wearing an ankle monitor?

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Feb 27, 2020 13:46:00   #
Swamp-Cork Loc: Lanexa, Virginia
 
Amazing!

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