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Color Shift
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Feb 22, 2020 17:39:06   #
raymondh Loc: Walker, MI
 
Here are the details of these I shot a few hours ago. There has been NO processing of any kind other than converting the RAW to jpg and reducing the file size to 2040 on the long side. They were also shot in HS burst mode so they were within fractions of a second apart - I think the Canon 1dx2 shoots around 14fps in raw.
Canon Lens= 70-200 II IS @F2.8; AI Servo; sp-640; 115mm; WB =3900 k; EC +1/3; meter =CW ave.

The 1st shot (A) represents pretty close to the actual pale green wall color. What do you suppose would cause the shift in (B) to light tan? I shot a burst of 8, all within a sec & the color changed on every other shot. Could it be some fluorescent flicker?


(Download)


(Download)

Feb 22, 2020 18:04:18   #
Ysarex
 
Flicker in the gym lighting. The lights aren't continuous -- they cycle and you got caught in between cycles.

Joe

Feb 22, 2020 18:14:23   #
Tomfl101 Loc: Mount Airy, MD
 
Yes I guess this is a flicker issue. The 5D4 will show Flicker! In the lower right corner when in that type of light. I assume the 1DX has the feature. Look for Anti-Flicker Shoot in the “Camera” settings menu. Why it changes color without an exposure change is beyond my understanding.

 
 
Feb 23, 2020 06:06:42   #
Delderby Loc: Derby UK
 
Tomfl101 wrote:
Yes I guess this is a flicker issue. The 5D4 will show Flicker! In the lower right corner when in that type of light. I assume the 1DX has the feature. Look for Anti-Flicker Shoot in the “Camera” settings menu. Why it changes color without an exposure change is beyond my understanding.


White balance change in between the flickering?

Feb 23, 2020 09:49:18   #
Wasabi
 
raymondh wrote:
Here are the details of these I shot a few hours ago. There has been NO processing of any kind other than converting the RAW to jpg and reducing the file size to 2040 on the long side. They were also shot in HS burst mode so they were within fractions of a second apart - I think the Canon 1dx2 shoots around 14fps in raw.
Canon Lens= 70-200 II IS @F2.8; AI Servo; sp-640; 115mm; WB =3900 k; EC +1/3; meter =CW ave.

The 1st shot (A) represents pretty close to the actual pale green wall color. What do you suppose would cause the shift in (B) to light tan? I shot a burst of 8, all within a sec & the color changed on every other shot. Could it be some fluorescent flicker?
Here are the details of these I shot a few hours a... (show quote)


In large areas with multiple lighting fixtures and varying age in the fixtures and 'bulbs' there can be a subtle, slowly changing phase shift from the mixture. It is observable by the naked eye in some circumstances. Your shots might have caught it as it changed.

Feb 23, 2020 14:36:57   #
SENSORLOUPE
 
raymondh wrote:
Here are the details of these I shot a few hours ago. There has been NO processing of any kind other than converting the RAW to jpg and reducing the file size to 2040 on the long side. They were also shot in HS burst mode so they were within fractions of a second apart - I think the Canon 1dx2 shoots around 14fps in raw.
Canon Lens= 70-200 II IS @F2.8; AI Servo; sp-640; 115mm; WB =3900 k; EC +1/3; meter =CW ave.

The 1st shot (A) represents pretty close to the actual pale green wall color. What do you suppose would cause the shift in (B) to light tan? I shot a burst of 8, all within a sec & the color changed on every other shot. Could it be some fluorescent flicker?
Here are the details of these I shot a few hours a... (show quote)


I am not a pro, but I shoot Canon and have my Anti-Flicker Disabled. I shoot 10fps and all look the same. You prob. already know this, just my experience. And you prob. have a better Canon. 7Dmark11 here.

Feb 23, 2020 18:19:42   #
raymondh Loc: Walker, MI
 
Thanks for responding. The 1dxii does have the anti-flicker feature which I didn’t have enabled. However I’m in a bunch of different gyms & it’s only this one where it is an issue.

 
 
Feb 24, 2020 08:57:53   #
evan_moor
 
Ray, Shooting basketball in gyms with different light sources is difficult. Natural light, fluorescent varying backgrounds- it is very tricky. At least your scene is a real gym. I have difficulty because our "gym" is an auditorium with dark/light areas that alternate.

These are really good shots with excellent lighting in the images. I know you are just questioning the different tones, but I would be happy to get clear shots like that.

Feb 24, 2020 14:15:37   #
raymondh Loc: Walker, MI
 
evan_moor wrote:
Ray, Shooting basketball in gyms with different light sources is difficult. Natural light, fluorescent varying backgrounds- it is very tricky. At least your scene is a real gym. I have difficulty because our "gym" is an auditorium with dark/light areas that alternate.

These are really good shots with excellent lighting in the images. I know you are just questioning the different tones, but I would be happy to get clear shots like that.


I appreciate your approval. For the most part, my only concern is to capture some descent action that’s in focus. The tone change is not that crucial to the image, just surprising to me that it can alter so quickly & only in some arenas.

Feb 25, 2020 12:40:56   #
speters Loc: Grangeville/Idaho
 
Ysarex wrote:
Flicker in the gym lighting. The lights aren't continuous -- they cycle and you got caught in between cycles.

Joe


That is correct, but said camera has correction for it ( I guess it was not enabled)!

Mar 10, 2020 05:02:38   #
jlocke Loc: Austin, TX
 
Saw this a while back in a posting in the Sports Photography group; it answered some questions I had about lighting at a particular hockey rink. Most of the photos have an overall green cast, but some of them show a red tinge. Lots of fun in post-processing!

If you are in gyms or soccer fields that have quartz halogen lighting, there's nothing you can do about the color balance, except to set for Auto. Those lights cycle constantly between the green mercury and the orange sodium filaments and depending upon the fps you shoot at, you can get either color one right behind the other. The flicker setting does not help this. I generally pick out the best green tint and use that one to correct. The orange tint seems underexposed--even though it's a nano-second behind the green one and an awful color to correct. Google this and you'll get all the info you need to know--no solutions, but the reasons why anyway."

 
 
Mar 10, 2020 09:30:02   #
raymondh Loc: Walker, MI
 
jlocke wrote:
Saw this a while back in a posting in the Sports Photography group; it answered some questions I had about lighting at a particular hockey rink. Most of the photos have an overall green cast, but some of them show a red tinge. Lots of fun in post-processing!

If you are in gyms or soccer fields that have quartz halogen lighting, there's nothing you can do about the color balance, except to set for Auto. Those lights cycle constantly between the green mercury and the orange sodium filaments and depending upon the fps you shoot at, you can get either color one right behind the other. The flicker setting does not help this. I generally pick out the best green tint and use that one to correct. The orange tint seems underexposed--even though it's a nano-second behind the green one and an awful color to correct. Google this and you'll get all the info you need to know--no solutions, but the reasons why anyway."
Saw this a while back in a posting in the Sports P... (show quote)


Most informative - thanks!!

May 10, 2020 09:15:20   #
Kaib795 Loc: Maryland, USA
 
You can fix this issue if you have Photoshop and use "Divide Blend" to fix color casts but you have to find a spot in the picture that should be white. You can fix any shot, perfectly.

For the short hand steps do this:
Use the color picker to select a area that should be white (like the blown out left shoulder of the ref) > sample it > choose adj layer ... solid color > Ok > choose blend mode to divide > double click on adjustment symbol to get back into color picker and to regain highlights move slider (in the middle of the screen) to top > Ok. Done!

For my educational go to Photoshop source, go here to see the video by PiXimperfect:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnWF-TumQXw
This guy is a fast talker but I like him and he's really is a great source of knowledge. Adobe should hire him!

Jun 21, 2020 09:07:03   #
Hamltnblue Loc: Springfield PA
 
First shot the camera may have picked up on the sun reflections, the second on the artificial lighting.

Jun 21, 2020 09:40:39   #
Kaib795 Loc: Maryland, USA
 
The issue here is ... if you turn slightly to get another shot, you're looking at a different light (maybe your auto WB made a bad judgement call) and get a color cast in that shot. Green casts are often from fluorescent lighting. This can happen all the time and does happen to all of us. Best thing, you got the shot and it can be fixed with a little post computer work. For very simple adjustments, you could also try a photo filter in Photoshop to correct the green cast, but it's a down and dirty fix with no real exact correcting but it will look better.

Do try the Photoshop fix I posted above using blend mode/divide. It really can fix any tinted shot ... as long as you have one spot in the shot that should be pure white (any blown sparkle of light will do to work off of). Most versions of PS can do this. Watch the video and see for yourself. It's amazing. Even if you don't have Photoshop, watch the video and see what professional software can do. But do understand that when you get into color correcting work, you need to calibrate your monitor first so your viewing true colors in the first place.

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