Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Lack of DSLR’s at Disney World
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Jan 14, 2020 10:55:40   #
BobHartung Loc: Bettendorf, IA
 
yds0066 wrote:
Just got back from Disney World and all I saw was about 2 dozen digital DSLR’s including Mirrorless the entire time I was there. The park photographers all use Crop Sensor Nikon’s. EVERYBODY was using cell phones. I didn’t see a single point and shoot and only a few bridge type cameras. I was surprised.


With a good cell phone image you can print up to 14" so why bother with more if not needed. It is all about matching the tool to the job. Most people are there to enjoy a vacation with their kids or grandkids. All they need are snapshots not works of art.

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Jan 14, 2020 11:13:21   #
Ched49 Loc: Pittsburgh, Pa.
 
BigDaddy wrote:
Went to two weddings last year and the only "real" cameras seen were the paid photographers. Everyone else, including me, used their cells. Not surprised at all that tourists at an amusement park would be lacking "real" cameras.

Another thing is few pictures are ever printed, and many disappear after taken, like Snapchat, they disappear after viewed, automatically dumped into digital heaven/hell. My kids, in their mid 30's, don't even own printers, photo or otherwise, but they take photo's all day long.

A lot has changed in the photo world in the past few years.
Went to two weddings last year and the only "... (show quote)


Not at all surprised, this is the age of "instant gratification" by doing the least amount of work, except for professional photographers. Few people go out and shop, they would rather stay home and order stuff online and wait for the boxes to be delivered. It's the same with grocery stopping, order groceries online in the comfort of your own home, then drive to the supermarket and somebody else will load them in your trunk.

I guess most people like us on this forum are in the minority, i love looking at the printed photograph, especially old black & whites, i also like to know how a dedicated camera operates. My son and his wife are in their 30's, they are always taking pictures with their i phones, maybe post them to their friends on Face Book and that's it, never think about printing them. I guess we people at UHH are a dying breed.

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Jan 14, 2020 11:31:54   #
alkaye Loc: North Myrtle Beach, SC
 
yds0066 wrote:
Just got back from Disney World and all I saw was about 2 dozen digital DSLR’s including Mirrorless the entire time I was there. The park photographers all use Crop Sensor Nikon’s. EVERYBODY was using cell phones. I didn’t see a single point and shoot and only a few bridge type cameras. I was surprised.


I plan on going to Disney with my family next year and expect to take my DSLR. My decision hinged on the purpose of my photography. There will be enough family members to make pics that record our fun times. My intent is to capture those moments that my DSLR is particularly good at, such as action shots, emotions and the candid moments that will be special to us. I just don't know how to do that with my iPhone.

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Jan 14, 2020 11:52:58   #
rangel28
 
yds0066 wrote:
Just got back from Disney World and all I saw was about 2 dozen digital DSLR’s including Mirrorless the entire time I was there. The park photographers all use Crop Sensor Nikon’s. EVERYBODY was using cell phones. I didn’t see a single point and shoot and only a few bridge type cameras. I was surprised.


When I went to Disneyland about two years ago I took my DSLR and Nikon A1000, a small pocket able camera. I left the DSLR in the room on the days we went to the park and I am glad I did, considering that I was going on rides where I was going to be jostled about and get wet. The A1000 fit in my pocket but there was no way I wanted to carry a DSLR and lenses on those rides.

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Jan 14, 2020 11:57:53   #
wdross Loc: Castle Rock, Colorado
 
burkphoto wrote:
Why the surprise? The "real camera" (whatever that means...) market has been shrinking since about 2000.

First to go were film cameras. Many of those were replaced by digital point-and-shoot and bridge cameras, but "serious" photographers bought their first dSLRs.

Next, the smartphone wars heated up in the late 2000s, and the point-and-shoot market dried up because NO ONE in their right mind wants to carry more than one point-and-shoot device. (Let's see, do I want to carry a dedicated camera the size of a cigarette pack, or a smaller smartphone (supercomputer in my pocket) that can do any of two million different things, just by downloading the right applications?)

What's happening now is a slow erosion of the remaining market. I reflect back on the 1960s and '70s, and see a photography hobby that demanded good SLR gear to get decent results. But today, a smartphone is adequate to yield similar results for many kinds of photos, and even better for others. And the fact that it is nearly always connected to the Internet for social media sharing makes it ideal for recording family events.

We still need interchangeable lens cameras for our most serious work, but less often. Fewer buyers of SLRs ever wanted to do that level of work, anyway. They just thought they did. I know lots of folks who bought Nikons, Canons, Minoltas, Pentaxes, and even Petris, only to let them sit in rotting leather bags for decades.

Hell, I worked for a photography company for decades, but I put down my personal SLRs for years when we were both working and raising kids. We had several point-and-shoot cameras, and no time to bring out the big bag.

In 1982, I was in Anaheim for the National Audio-Visual Association / International Communications Industries Association, with splinter meetings of the Association for Audio-Visual Technicians, Association for Multi-Image, and the Industrial TV Association. I took a day after the convention and went to Disneyland with a Nikon F3, five lenses, and ten rolls of Kodachrome. I would never do that now! I reserve my serious camera system for serious work — "intentional" photography. I use my iPhone for everything else. It's a compromise, but it's always with me!
Why the surprise? The "real camera" (wha... (show quote)


And now, with Samsung and others that are putting a 5X zoom lens inside that slim and trim smartphone (more zoom than my wife's Olympus XZ-1 P&S), there will be even less need and/or requirements for some to move to a larger, heavier camera, even to the likes of an Olympus E-10 as small and light as it is. The market for larger cameras is still going to shrink some more both fortunately and unfortunately for the photographers here at UHHs. Unfortunate because some of the manufactures of today's cameras will not be here in the future. And fortunate because the remaining manufacturers will be producing the most technologically advanced cameras the world will ever see.

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Jan 14, 2020 12:03:16   #
Mr Bill 2011 Loc: southern Indiana
 
I find that, unless I am actually planning to photograph something, I carry my little Lumix ZS100, either in a little belt pouch, or just in my pocket.

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Jan 14, 2020 12:07:32   #
billnikon Loc: Pennsylvania/Ohio/Florida/Maui/Oregon/Vermont
 
yds0066 wrote:
Just got back from Disney World and all I saw was about 2 dozen digital DSLR’s including Mirrorless the entire time I was there. The park photographers all use Crop Sensor Nikon’s. EVERYBODY was using cell phones. I didn’t see a single point and shoot and only a few bridge type cameras. I was surprised.


Disney World is a theme park with lots, and lots, and lots of rides that are unfriendly to large camera's.

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Jan 14, 2020 12:07:49   #
rook2c4 Loc: Philadelphia, PA USA
 
jerryc41 wrote:
Welcome to the modern world. I see very few DSLRs at photo-popular locations - cell phones and tablets.


It wasn't really all that different 30 years ago. Instead of cell phones and tablets, most people taking pictures back then were using consumer compact point & shoots, disposable cameras, and occasionally instant film cameras. A time when everyone was walking around with an SLR camera never really existed.

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Jan 14, 2020 12:13:43   #
wdross Loc: Castle Rock, Colorado
 
Haydon wrote:
I see a lack of cellphones doing BIF :)


Only a matter of time before someone will have a "bird in flight" shot take with their 5X zoom lens at 1/8000 of a second on their 108 megapixel Samsung smartphone. And it will be as good as anything we could have shot with our larger cameras. Just not necessarily done as easily as with our cameras. And done with a lens with limitations. But the BIF photo, done by smartphone, will probably happen this year.

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Jan 14, 2020 12:29:46   #
DanielB Loc: San Diego, Ca
 
yds0066 wrote:
Just got back from Disney World and all I saw was about 2 dozen digital DSLR’s including Mirrorless the entire time I was there. The park photographers all use Crop Sensor Nikon’s. EVERYBODY was using cell phones. I didn’t see a single point and shoot and only a few bridge type cameras. I was surprised.


As a photographer I would naturally reach for my Canon R but for the average person they probably don't even own a DSLR or Mirrorless camera. I don't find this surprising at all.

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Jan 14, 2020 12:51:59   #
frankraney Loc: Clovis, Ca. For the last 50 years.
 
yds0066 wrote:
Just got back from Disney World and all I saw was about 2 dozen digital DSLR’s including Mirrorless the entire time I was there. The park photographers all use Crop Sensor Nikon’s. EVERYBODY was using cell phones. I didn’t see a single point and shoot and only a few bridge type cameras. I was surprised.


Took mine once, never again. have you ever tried to ride those rides with a big camera hanging around your neck or in the backpack it gets pretty tough and they get in the way of the fun. So there are two options, number one is take a point and shoot that will fit in your pocket for memory shots and enjoy the rights and the park, number two is go strictly for a photo shoot and take your DSLR.

I think really the main reason is this a lot more people that talk on phones than there are of us with DSLR's.

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Jan 14, 2020 13:34:53   #
nadelewitz Loc: Ithaca NY
 
yds0066 wrote:
Just got back from Disney World and all I saw was about 2 dozen digital DSLR’s including Mirrorless the entire time I was there. The park photographers all use Crop Sensor Nikon’s. EVERYBODY was using cell phones. I didn’t see a single point and shoot and only a few bridge type cameras. I was surprised.


By "crop sensor Nikons" may I presume you meant "compact" cameras? DSLRs include crop-sensors models.
No mystery here.
You were seeing two phenomena......Park photogs carrying smaller lighter cameras for all-day comfort. Civilians not carrying dedicated cameras at all because phones have have taken over a lot of photography.

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Jan 14, 2020 13:57:27   #
BigDaddy Loc: Pittsburgh, PA
 
burkphoto wrote:

..... I reserve my serious camera system for serious work — "intentional" photography. I use my iPhone for everything else. It's a compromise, but it's always with me!

"intentional photography" I love that. I've been taking pics with slrs or dslr's since around 1975. I have done a wee bit of "intentional photography." I think that's why I'm not particularly all that good at it, and after an astronomical number of pictures in film and digital, I'm still not much more than a "snapshooter."
I'm more serious about photo editing than photo taking, probably why my 'development' as a "photographer" has been long in coming.😉

Anyhow, that's the first I heard of "intentional photography". I know exactly what it is, and I've managed to avoid it rather well. It was enjoyable when I tried it, but generally too much work for my interest level. I think I'm somewhere in between cells and dslr's.... no mans land of photography.

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Jan 14, 2020 14:09:14   #
traderjohn Loc: New York City
 
alkaye wrote:
I plan on going to Disney with my family next year and expect to take my DSLR. My decision hinged on the purpose of my photography. There will be enough family members to make pics that record our fun times. My intent is to capture those moments that my DSLR is particularly good at, such as action shots, emotions and the candid moments that will be special to us. I just don't know how to do that with my iPhone.


WHAT????!!! Are you joking???

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Jan 14, 2020 14:10:57   #
traderjohn Loc: New York City
 
frankraney wrote:
Took mine once, never again. have you ever tried to ride those rides with a big camera hanging around your neck or in the backpack it gets pretty tough and they get in the way of the fun. So there are two options, number one is take a point and shoot that will fit in your pocket for memory shots and enjoy the rights and the park, number two is go strictly for a photo shoot and take your DSLR.

I think really the main reason is this a lot more people that talk on phones than there are of us with DSLR's.
Took mine once, never again. have you ever tried t... (show quote)


And take photographs. A lot more photographs.

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