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I really need RAW help - please
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Oct 9, 2019 07:08:59   #
Gspeed Loc: Rhinebeck, NY
 
[This is the best advice.

Just go RAW! You will be fine!

uote=Gene51]There isn't much to shooting raw. Most of the time you can use the same settings you've been using.

What you'll be missing out on might be leveraging the additional dynamic range that raw provides.

I suggest you shoot raw only. This way you won't get tripped up with multiple files with the same filename and managing that mess.

The raw files have no picture controls applied to them, such as sharpening, noise reduction, contrast etc so they will appear flat, soft and noisy compared to the jpeg.

I don't know which software you are using, but I will suggest you consider Lightroom Classic and Photoshop CC - it is a complete editing solution that will grow with you as your skills advance.

You'll take your pictures now then get everything sorted with the software and computer when you get back. Have fun and take a bunch of pictures![/quote]

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Oct 9, 2019 07:09:02   #
tcthome Loc: Keansburg , NJ
 
Sark17 wrote:
Maybe the question then becomes how to get the grain out of RAW photos? I have PhotoshopCC, LRCC, Luminar 3 and iPhoto (which I don't think would be much help). I reduced noise and used a noise filter, and they're better but still majorly grainy.


Some editing adjustments can cause noise or a grain type look. Try to get your exposure as good as possible in camera unless you are stacking like for landscapes, sunsets etc.

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Oct 9, 2019 07:10:23   #
jerryc41 Loc: Catskill Mts of NY
 
Wow! Up to four pages already. I'm assuming that you got enough info, so I'll hold my comments, except...

Raw does allow more room for processing, but you don't have to shoot raw. That's a relatively new development in digital photography. Raw files must be processed to look good, so if you take a thousand pictures, that's something to consider. I was at an event with a professional photographer over the weekend, and I asked him a few questions. He was shooting JPEG because they were all going online, and he wasn't about to process a thousand or more pictures. As someone has probably said, the make and model of camera you're using determines what software can process the results.

I'm glad I decided to hold my comments.

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Oct 9, 2019 07:11:39   #
tcthome Loc: Keansburg , NJ
 
robertjerl wrote:
Most guides to PP work I have read put sharpening last in the workflow.


Yup, a lot of pros suggest that.

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Oct 9, 2019 07:15:02   #
tcthome Loc: Keansburg , NJ
 
CHG_CANON wrote:
As a subscriber, you can open a free chat with Adobe Technical Support and ask them to determine the cause of the problem. We're not there to peek over your shoulder to see your computer, where Adobe can remote-in and make such an inspection. Both the EOS R CR2 and CR3 files are listed as being supported by LR Classic.

You should expect to need a minimum of 2-weeks to be confident and comfortable in LR RAW editing, maybe less, probably longer. I learn something new probably weekly about the software, even now at almost 4-years of nearly daily use. Both the Adobe site and free videos on u-tube provide hundreds of hours of video training.

Based on my own experience, I've put together two medium-technical posts that might be useful when you have more time to concentrate on using LR:

Basics of noise processing

Basics of Lightroom Sharpening
As a subscriber, you can open a free chat with Ado... (show quote)

Great work!

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Oct 9, 2019 07:21:56   #
billnikon Loc: Pennsylvania/Ohio/Florida/Maui/Oregon/Vermont
 
Sark17 wrote:
I have it that way now, which is how I got both of these photos to compare, but I guess I didn't want to waste a ton of space on a memory card for no reason. I am hoping to understand at least if I am doing something wrong or not before I do that. And yes, I do have about 8 SD cards so I would be fine. I guess I am more confused as to why they look awful and how the heck to do anything with them once they are in Lightroom.


Why not ask your professional photographer friend who suggested you shoot in raw the same question you have asked us? Maybe your professional photographer friend can figure it out for you, after all, he/she is the one who recommended you shoot in RAW.
PS. I was a professional photographer and now retired and I do shows and use images that are commonly printed to 20X30 and all my shows feature JPG.

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Oct 9, 2019 07:43:22   #
aschweik Loc: NE Ohio
 
I don't think anyone has mentioned maybe just putting your camera in auto mode for some parts of the trip. You want to enjoy yourself and not stress over camera issues. I don't mean use auto mode for the whole trip because there will be times you need to pick your settings wisely. But it seems to be a lot of stress to learn something new right before you go. Sometimes it's ok to let your camera do the work. Nothing wrong with JPG if the person behind the camera can take a decent picture. But in those tricky situations like low lighting, you may want to move your camera to manual and raw/jpg so you can edit better. I'm not a pro nor will I ever be one. But I've been on once-in-a-lifetime trips and you need to enjoy it, not spend too much time on the technical end. I only shoot raw now because I learned it awhile ago and got used to it. Plus I like to edit and I don't edit every single picture I take. Just the ones that I like the best. So it's not a lot of work. But just enjoy that trip, take the best photos you can, and don't worry too much about shooting raw. Do it if you feel comfortable. If not, shoot jpg and have fun. Whatever you do...share your photos when you get back! We all envy that you get to go on that cool Africa trip!

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Oct 9, 2019 07:47:41   #
Delderby Loc: Derby UK
 
Sark17 wrote:
Hello! I am new to shooting RAW and am getting more confused by the day. I have a professional photographer friend who tells me I HAVE to shoot in raw on an upcoming trip to Africa (I leave Friday!) So I started shooting raw to practice using my dogs. I figured it would be fairly straight forward - I was very wrong. I use a Canon EOS R with various lenses.

In the first screen shot you can see the JPG (right) compared to the RAW photo (left). The Raw photo is super grainy. The JPG is fine. I didn't edit any of these or even try for any good composition, just wanted to practice working with RAW and getting them off of my card - which has also proven to be complicated.

So, my questions - 1) why are my RAW photos much more grainy than JPG? I realize ISO is a bit high in this specific photo, but even when it's not at all, I get the same result. 2) what is the most straightforward way to get to get a raw file off of an SD card and actually be able to do anything with it on a Mac? Lastly, I am probably just going to shoot Large JPG to save myself the panic of ruining something trying to use RAW if I can't figure this out...

I am currently using a DNG converter to get them to Lightroom, then I am not totally sure what to do with them after that, I couldn't even figure out how to save it to post it here as an example as I did with the JPEG.

Thank you so much in advance for any tips/tricks you are willing to lend - I am pretty confused!
Hello! I am new to shooting RAW and am getting mor... (show quote)


A very wise man said "don't try to run before you can walk - or you will surely trip up".
IF you have sufficient storage and sufficient batteries and means to recharge those batteries - shoot RAW plus fine JPG. If you need to choose between the two shoot JPG. Is the picture of your dog ok in JPG? of course it is! Is it editable anyway? Of course it is. Just transfer your files - JPG & RAW - to your lap top.
Edit them back home - whether you are good with RAW PP or not, I'm sure you wouldn't be doing it in Africa!
If you are a seasoned manual shooter shoot manual - if not, shoot in A or S or P. You still have control (sunny sixteen may not work in Africa).
Obtain a small inverter with an automobile lighter plug which can provide power to charge your batteries - inexpensive and light!

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Oct 9, 2019 08:00:24   #
jaymatt Loc: Alexandria, Indiana
 
If you’re new to the whole RAW thing, use jpg on your trip to be sure you get some good photos. Learning RAW takes a bit of time, albeit producing better photos. Go ahead and shoot both if your camera allows it. That way you’ll have instant gratification of your photos and can work with them in RAW later after you have a good processing program. If you don’t want to get sucked into a monthly fee for a raw program, I suggest Luminar3. It’s pretty easy to learn and there are lots of helpful videos.

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Oct 9, 2019 08:01:44   #
Notorious T.O.D. Loc: Harrisburg, North Carolina
 
Shoot both RAW and JPEG and have enough cards to cover the amount of shots you expect to take plus say 20 percent spare. Even if you don’t process all the RAW files ever you will still have them. Think of it as saving negatives in film days. You can process or reprocess a RAW file today, tomorrow, next month or even years from now. Storage is cheap.

I will suggest Laura Snow video instruction for Lightroom and Photoshop to you. The cost is very fair and she breaks the topics down into logical 5-15 minute bites that you can easily refer back too anytime.

Enjoy your trip.

Sark17 wrote:
Hello! I am new to shooting RAW and am getting more confused by the day. I have a professional photographer friend who tells me I HAVE to shoot in raw on an upcoming trip to Africa (I leave Friday!) So I started shooting raw to practice using my dogs. I figured it would be fairly straight forward - I was very wrong. I use a Canon EOS R with various lenses.

In the first screen shot you can see the JPG (right) compared to the RAW photo (left). The Raw photo is super grainy. The JPG is fine. I didn't edit any of these or even try for any good composition, just wanted to practice working with RAW and getting them off of my card - which has also proven to be complicated.

So, my questions - 1) why are my RAW photos much more grainy than JPG? I realize ISO is a bit high in this specific photo, but even when it's not at all, I get the same result. 2) what is the most straightforward way to get to get a raw file off of an SD card and actually be able to do anything with it on a Mac? Lastly, I am probably just going to shoot Large JPG to save myself the panic of ruining something trying to use RAW if I can't figure this out...

I am currently using a DNG converter to get them to Lightroom, then I am not totally sure what to do with them after that, I couldn't even figure out how to save it to post it here as an example as I did with the JPEG.

Thank you so much in advance for any tips/tricks you are willing to lend - I am pretty confused!
Hello! I am new to shooting RAW and am getting mor... (show quote)

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Oct 9, 2019 08:11:58   #
Sark17 Loc: Atlanta, GA
 
No offense - but I absolutely DO know how to use my camera, I’ve had a canon since I was 4 years old. I don’t know how to use one element of my camera, raw, that I’ve never wanted to learn before. I’ve never wanted to shoot raw. I’ve had 0 desire to. What the hell is the fun of paying someone to take photos? Taking photos IS the fun. And I don’t have “all of this money”. I have a trial of luminar and the other two combined are $10/month. Where did I ever say I don’t know how to use my camera? You’re “no offense” is pretty damn rude.

martinfisherphoto wrote:
No offense, but you should take someone with you to take some photos. You don't even know how to use your camera and you've purchased a half dozen different softwares. Now your going on a vacation on Friday and you want to just start shooting raw. You can't learn it all in a couple of days or weeks. If you got all this money to throw around I suggest taking some lessons. Purchase the book Understanding Exposure 3rd edition by Bryan Peterson. It's about $5 used on the internet. Start at the beginning and learn from there. If you don't learn the basic then NOTHING will make sense.
No offense, but you should take someone with you t... (show quote)

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Oct 9, 2019 08:13:24   #
Sark17 Loc: Atlanta, GA
 
I did ask my photographer friend, she doesn’t get grain apparently and she uses a Nikon so figures it may be a canon thing 😂

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Oct 9, 2019 08:21:13   #
Sark17 Loc: Atlanta, GA
 
Thank you!!! I’m definitely not going to only shoot raw, that would be awful. I’m probably doing JPEG only or jpeg + raw. I don’t shoot on auto through, usually only manual. The issue isn’t with focus and adjustments, or composition really, though of course I can improve on that too, but it’s more the actual raw image that is produced and knowing how to get it onto my computer since I have never shot raw before. Thank you for the tips!

aschweik wrote:
I don't think anyone has mentioned maybe just putting your camera in auto mode for some parts of the trip. You want to enjoy yourself and not stress over camera issues. I don't mean use auto mode for the whole trip because there will be times you need to pick your settings wisely. But it seems to be a lot of stress to learn something new right before you go. Sometimes it's ok to let your camera do the work. Nothing wrong with JPG if the person behind the camera can take a decent picture. But in those tricky situations like low lighting, you may want to move your camera to manual and raw/jpg so you can edit better. I'm not a pro nor will I ever be one. But I've been on once-in-a-lifetime trips and you need to enjoy it, not spend too much time on the technical end. I only shoot raw now because I learned it awhile ago and got used to it. Plus I like to edit and I don't edit every single picture I take. Just the ones that I like the best. So it's not a lot of work. But just enjoy that trip, take the best photos you can, and don't worry too much about shooting raw. Do it if you feel comfortable. If not, shoot jpg and have fun. Whatever you do...share your photos when you get back! We all envy that you get to go on that cool Africa trip!
I don't think anyone has mentioned maybe just putt... (show quote)

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Oct 9, 2019 08:23:40   #
Sark17 Loc: Atlanta, GA
 
Thank you, I guess it was just my friend who is such a die hard raw shooter that made me think I needed to learn or my photos would all be junk in jpeg. Thank you!

jerryc41 wrote:
Wow! Up to four pages already. I'm assuming that you got enough info, so I'll hold my comments, except...

Raw does allow more room for processing, but you don't have to shoot raw. That's a relatively new development in digital photography. Raw files must be processed to look good, so if you take a thousand pictures, that's something to consider. I was at an event with a professional photographer over the weekend, and I asked him a few questions. He was shooting JPEG because they were all going online, and he wasn't about to process a thousand or more pictures. As someone has probably said, the make and model of camera you're using determines what software can process the results.

I'm glad I decided to hold my comments.
Wow! Up to four pages already. I'm assuming that... (show quote)

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Oct 9, 2019 08:24:59   #
mizzee Loc: Boston,Ma
 
If you have the option of jpeg fine, try that. Raw and post processing go hand in hand. Suggest that you look for a class on Lightroom when you get back.

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