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Vatican Snapshot - Vertical correction or not?
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Aug 31, 2019 13:04:45   #
Saigon Loc: Atlanta, GA
 
Hi,

This is just a snapshot which I took during Rome visit. Do you think I need straighten out the vertical line a little bit more or just keep it this way to reserve the dome on the top of the picture?

Thanks for your help in advance....

Cheer


(Download)

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Aug 31, 2019 13:07:11   #
PixelStan77 Loc: Vermont/Chicago
 
Saigon wrote:
Hi,

This is just a snapshot which I took during Rome visit. Do you think I need straighten out the vertical line a little bit more or just keep it this way to reserve the dome on the top of the picture?

Thanks for your help in advance....

Cheer


All I would do is crop that light area on left. It distracts from the main image.In double download, I like the cropping of the image

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Aug 31, 2019 13:12:07   #
Saigon Loc: Atlanta, GA
 
PixelStan77 wrote:
All I would do is crop that light area on left. It distracts from the main image.In double download, I like the cropping of the image


Thanks so much PixelStan77! Totally agree on that window light distraction. Or I could dim it a little bit more right?

Thx

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Aug 31, 2019 13:56:46   #
bpulv Loc: Buena Park, CA
 
PixelStan77 wrote:
All I would do is crop that light area on left. It distracts from the main image.In double download, I like the cropping of the image


I would not crop the left. Instead, I would crop a little of the right only removing a little of the whitest part of that piler. The converging lines of the two foreground pilers (like a railroad track) help lead the eyes to the door area where you want the pilers to be parallel.

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Aug 31, 2019 14:17:36   #
cascoly Loc: seattle
 
in PS you can try "edit/ perspective warp" and see if it gives you a 'better' image. it will also allow you to crop out the distracting white columns

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Aug 31, 2019 14:18:57   #
Saigon Loc: Atlanta, GA
 
bpulv wrote:
I would not crop the left. Instead, I would crop a little of the right only removing a little of the whitest part of that piler. The converging lines of the two foreground pilers (like a railroad track) help lead the eyes to the door area where you want the pilers to be parallel.


Thanks so much bpulv! It is a touch decision because cropping a little bit too much you may loose some of the depth from the steps.

Here is the latest editing version.


(Download)

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Aug 31, 2019 14:25:31   #
bpulv Loc: Buena Park, CA
 
Saigon wrote:
Thanks so much bpulv! It is a touch decision because cropping a little bit too much you may loose some of the depth from the steps.

Here is the latest editing version.


You cropped a lot more than I envisioned. I suggested a little of the white section, not the entire white section. Let's see what it looks like with only about 15-20% of the white cropped out; no more. As an alternative, you could slightly darken the white area thereby making it less of a distraction.

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Aug 31, 2019 14:38:22   #
Saigon Loc: Atlanta, GA
 
bpulv wrote:
You cropped a lot more than I envisioned. I suggested a little of the white section, not the entire white section. Let's see what it looks like with only about 15-20% of the white cropped out; no more. As an alternative, you could slightly darken the white area thereby making it less of a distraction.


Thanks bpulv! I will try it later on. Much appreciated.

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Aug 31, 2019 14:44:51   #
Saigon Loc: Atlanta, GA
 
bpulv wrote:
You cropped a lot more than I envisioned. I suggested a little of the white section, not the entire white section. Let's see what it looks like with only about 15-20% of the white cropped out; no more. As an alternative, you could slightly darken the white area thereby making it less of a distraction.


Is this better bpulv (darkening)? Thx


(Download)

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Aug 31, 2019 17:50:11   #
bpulv Loc: Buena Park, CA
 
Saigon wrote:
Is this better bpulv (darkening)? Thx


Right on, however you should now make sure that the columns on either side of the door are 90 degrees to the "floor" by slightly by using Photoshop's Straightening function or the equivalent function in the editing software you are using. Since the steps, door jam, pillers, etc. are not 100% 90 degrees to each other, rely on your eye to establish the best feeling for level.


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Aug 31, 2019 19:45:24   #
cascoly Loc: seattle
 
here's the version using perspective wrap..



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Aug 31, 2019 20:26:07   #
Saigon Loc: Atlanta, GA
 
bpulv wrote:
Right on, however you should now make sure that the columns on either side of the door are 90 degrees to the "floor" by slightly by using Photoshop's Straightening function or the equivalent function in the editing software you are using. Since the steps, door jam, pillers, etc. are not 100% 90 degrees to each other, rely on your eye to establish the best feeling for level.

Right on, however you should now make sure that th... (show quote)


Thanks for your suggestion. Much appreciated.

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Aug 31, 2019 20:26:34   #
Saigon Loc: Atlanta, GA
 
cascoly wrote:
here's the version using perspective wrap..


Thanks cascoly! Nicely done....

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Sep 1, 2019 06:57:55   #
R.G. Loc: Scotland
 
Normally I would suggest not getting rid of all of the perspective-related convergence because the eye expects it and it's a natural part of how we see things. As a general rule it only becomes a problem if it's extreme due to the exaggeration caused by a wide angle lens. A line of sight (i.e. the tilt of the camera) that's well away from horizontal will also exaggerate the convergence. However......

In this case what makes it problematic is the vertical lines close to the edges of the frame, and that is aggravated by the bright triangles that are formed between the verticals and the edges of the frame. You need to decide if those white areas are important to the shot, and if they're not you need to lose them, or alternatively use enough perspective correction to make those verticals parallel with the edges of the frame.

As a general rule, convergence near the centre of the frame is far more acceptable visually than convergence near the edges of the frame, because the edges of the frame accentuate any tilt. Not only is moderate convergence a natural phenomenon, it can also be used to create a visually dramatic effect which emphasises height and/or depth.

Also, if you have lens corrections as an option, use that first, because if you don't you could end up trying to correct what is in reality lens-induced curvature by using the linear corrections of the perspective tool (which would not produce good results).

Perspective distortion correction will cause the top of the image to be stretched but the bottom of the image will be left more-or-less alone, so don't be too concerned about losing details in the immediate foreground like the edges of the steps.

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Sep 1, 2019 08:07:52   #
par4fore Loc: Bay Shore N.Y.
 
Saigon wrote:
Hi,

This is just a snapshot which I took during Rome visit. Do you think I need straighten out the vertical line a little bit more or just keep it this way to reserve the dome on the top of the picture?

Thanks for your help in advance....

Cheer


I put it through ACR distortion and finished with a free transform.


(Download)

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