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Switching from a crop sensor to a full frame
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Jul 20, 2019 18:50:03   #
Hans2675
 
Hi, I'm questioning if I should sell my Canon 80d for a used 6d full frame. I'm perfectly happy with the 80d and the crop sensor and I also don't feel like it's limiting me yet in my photography. Just considering it because of most of the things I read when it comes to Focal lengths seem to always be in regards to full frame cameras. For example this lens and Focal length is best for portraits or this Focal length for landscapes. I'm well aware I can use a smaller length to compensate for the 1.6 crop to to equal a suggested length, but just feel like the availability isn't there and I'm beginning to look at higher end lenses "L" lenses and feel like they'd be best suited with a full frame. Photography is definitely something I'm going to continue to do and may quite possibly pursue as a career in the future. Right now mostly take landscapes and street photography, but would like to begin to dabble and learn some portraiture. Selling my 80d and buying a used 6d with a low shutter count would basically be an even trade for me. Thanks in advance for everyone's help.

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Jul 20, 2019 19:00:19   #
Bill_de (a regular here)
 
You answered your own question.

I'm perfectly happy with the 80d and the crop sensor and I also don't feel like it's limiting me yet in my photography.

Now that that's of the way, if you really want a new camera, go buy it. You don't need to rationalize nor look for encouragement from people you never met.

Enjoy the toys!

--

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Jul 20, 2019 19:41:55   #
lamiaceae (a regular here)
 
Hans2675 wrote:
Hi, I'm questioning if I should sell my Canon 80d for a used 6d full frame. I'm perfectly happy with the 80d and the crop sensor and I also don't feel like it's limiting me yet in my photography. Just considering it because of most of the things I read when it comes to Focal lengths seem to always be in regards to full frame cameras. For example this lens and Focal length is best for portraits or this Focal length for landscapes. I'm well aware I can use a smaller length to compensate for the 1.6 crop to to equal a suggested length, but just feel like the availability isn't there and I'm beginning to look at higher end lenses "L" lenses and feel like they'd be best suited with a full frame. Photography is definitely something I'm going to continue to do and may quite possibly pursue as a career in the future. Right now mostly take landscapes and street photography, but would like to begin to dabble and learn some portraiture. Selling my 80d and buying a used 6d with a low shutter count would basically be an even trade for me. Thanks in advance for everyone's help.
Hi, I'm questioning if I should sell my Canon 80d ... (show quote)


Also the referencing to FF lenses is that film 35mm cameras use(d) those focal length lenses as do digital FF camera. The terminology like most of photography is based on its history. Therefor focal lengths, angles of view and thus composition and perspective are all based on the FF standard. Actually, some of the first DSLRs were Full Frame but shortly the companies figured out they could market smaller sensored cameras and people would still buy them. Later yet, FF came back in to vogue again. The reason you are confused is that you do not have experience thinking about lenses long enough or in general. I not only know what focal length lens is used for what for say APS-C Crop Factor, Full Frame (same as film 24x36mm), but other cameras types such as 6x6cm and 6x7cm Medium Format film cameras, and 4x5" and 8x10" film view cameras. (Never used a 6x9cm or 5x7" camera though). I don't get confused because I have been doing photography with different types of cameras for about 42 years. Yes, playing with 1.5x and 1.6x factors for different sized sensors makes for more work and confusion. But there is no reason to change cameras based on what lens is considered a "normal" (prime) lens; 50mm for FF, 35mm for APS-C. Yes, there are differences in depth of field but that would also be true of a 24" lens on a 8x10" View Camera. Unless you know why the technical reasons are not something a beginner needs to bother with.

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Jul 20, 2019 19:42:41   #
LFingar (a regular here)
 
If, as you state, you are perfectly happy with your 80D and it is doing everything you currently need then I don't see why you should change. The 6D is a very good camera for shots of stationary scenes but the 80D beats it out for any kind of action shots. The 6D has better low light/high ISO performance. How important are those factors to your style of shooting? It appears that you have no problem figuring out the effect of the crop factor on field of view. Are you looking for a wider field of view then your current set up can provide? A lens can usually solve that problem. As far as lenses go, Canon's L lenses are generally a good investment for any of their cameras. With an EF-s lens you are using the entire lens and on most lenses the outer edges are where IQ problems can become noticeable. With EF lenses, which include all L lenses, you are only using the center of the lens with a crop sensor. The sweet-spot of the lens, so to speak. There are also some very good non-L EF lenses, plus some excellent 3rd party lenses.
You may have gotten the Full Frame Bug. A common ailment. In that case you are going to make the change anyway, but, as stated, I don't think that is necessarily your best course of action. I would invest in EF lenses instead. If you do switch to full frame in the future you'll be all set.
One more thought: Check out the EOS RP if you are determined to go FF. A full frame mirrorless at a very reasonable price. With the included adapter you can use any EF-s, EF , or the outstanding RF lenses. DSLR's are still excellent cameras, but, I have no doubt that mirrorless are going to start eating up their market share in the not too distant future. Canon has already announced cut backs in the development of some of their DSLR's and lenses.

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Jul 20, 2019 19:56:06   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
If you're perfectly happy with what you have, why get a new one?
When it no longer meets your needs, replace it.

My APS-C DSLR is nine years old and it meets my needs.
My bridge camera is thirteen years old.

Thought about another at one time (going to an 80D), would be nice, but I don't need it.

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Jul 20, 2019 20:43:03   #
DeanS (a regular here)
 
Suggestion: separate your “wants” from your “needs” and address each separately. Proceed from there.

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Jul 20, 2019 20:48:12   #
CHG_CANON (a regular here)
 
Buy full-frame lenses before changing your camera body, not after.

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Jul 20, 2019 20:56:36   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
CHG_CANON wrote:
Buy full-frame lenses before changing your camera body, not after.


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Jul 20, 2019 21:06:15   #
sloscheider
 
The only reason I moved to full frame bodies was low light performance, otherwise I'd have stayed with the more compact/lighter dx bodies I have. I do use some full frame lenses on my dx cameras though

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Jul 20, 2019 21:21:07   #
Hans2675
 
Thank you all for your help and your replies, it's really appreciated. As some of you said I answered my own question, but I still wanted some insight from people who have switched to FF from crop or just simply have more experience. I'm going to stick with the 80d and begin to look at upgrading my lenses. Thank you all so much!

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Jul 20, 2019 21:27:10   #
CO (a regular here)
 
You should have both cropped sensor and full frame. I have both a cropped sensor Nikon D500 and a full frame Nikon D750. I'll use the full frame if I'm going for a more shallow depth of field. I'll use the cropped sensor if I'm going for a deeper depth of field.

A 45mm lens on a full frame camera produces a perspective close to what the human eye sees. A 30mm lens on a 1.5x cropped sensor camera gives the same perspective and field of view (as long as you stay at the same spot) but the depth of field will be deeper.

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Jul 21, 2019 00:00:04   #
rmorrison1116 (a regular here)
 
I own both the 6D and the 80D and honestly, I use my 80D more than the 6D. Instead of selling your 80D, keep it and find a nice used 6D. The 6D is a nice camera but for wildlife, action and general photography, it can't touch the performance of the 80D.

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Jul 21, 2019 00:13:23   #
Wingpilot (a regular here)
 
Just remember that if you decide on the full frame 6D, you will have to buy all new full frame lenses as the lenses for your 80D will not fit on or work with the full frame camera. The camera may be at a good price, but the lenses will cost you much more.

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Jul 21, 2019 00:22:42   #
sloscheider
 
Wingpilot wrote:
Just remember that if you decide on the full frame 6D, you will have to buy all new full frame lenses as the lenses for your 80D will not fit on or work with the full frame camera. The camera may be at a good price, but the lenses will cost you much more.

Really? I though Canons lenses were interchangeable - A friend of mine uses an L series 80-200 (or equivalent) on her aps-c canon so I had assumed you could use the crop lenses on a full frame as well - yes I know there would be limitations just curious is this assumption is wrong.

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Jul 21, 2019 00:26:01   #
Wingpilot (a regular here)
 
Nope, it’s true.

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