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Photography Lawsuit
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May 2, 2019 07:49:35   #
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May 2, 2019 07:58:12   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
Well, it's no mystery that you can't use other people's photos without their permission. We have copyright laws, and there is a steady stream of lawsuits and complaints about someone stealing a photographer's work. Why would someone pay a photographer for his work if they could just see it and take it? A picture shot for one purpose could be "repurposed" to give a completely different impression.

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May 2, 2019 08:15:58   #
donrent
 
In my opinion once a photo has been published publicly , its fair game.

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May 2, 2019 08:22:22   #
pithydoug
 
jerryc41 wrote:
Well, it's no mystery that you can't use other people's photos without their permission. We have copyright laws, and there is a steady stream of lawsuits and complaints about someone stealing a photographer's work. Why would someone pay a photographer for his work if they could just see it and take it? A picture shot for one purpose could be "repurposed" to give a completely different impression.


I don't think it is quite that simple. If the pohoto is not being used for profit and just shown, I think it is quite legal.

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May 2, 2019 08:33:48   #
insman1132
 
Nuisance.

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May 2, 2019 08:37:01   #
CWGordon (a regular here)
 
I guess we’ll find out.
The Courts have had a lot of
trouble deciding how to decide
these cases. Decisions have been inconsistent at best. Rarely, though has much been done to protect pho tographers in any meaningful way.

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May 2, 2019 08:42:00   #
custodian
 
stealing is stealing , taken anything that isn't yours is stealing. but with that being said don't put it where it can be stolen..

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May 2, 2019 08:58:54   #
John Maher
 
This topic is addressed in "Digital Photo Magic: Easy Image Retouching and Restoration for Librarians, Archivists, and Teachers", Ernest Perez, ISBN 9781573875134. It provides a number of websites for info, sources for free images, and how to request/get permission to use protected images.

It is really dumb to end up in court when one could have asked and received permission!

Really great book (I am still reading). I will enter it into Resources also.

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May 2, 2019 09:23:42   #
custodian
 
asking is a good idea! keeps you out of trouble and out of court, saving you money to buy more camera equipment!

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May 2, 2019 11:21:02   #
PixelStan77 (a regular here)
 
Blaster34 wrote:


Both side lawyers will do well regardless of the outcome.

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May 2, 2019 18:24:12   #
custodian
 
Lol. Yes they will

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May 3, 2019 08:34:15   #
cdayton (a regular here)
 
The Northrop’s have an interesting video (search their site) on a copyright suit they actually won against someone using a photo of Chelsea on their products.

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May 3, 2019 09:19:26   #
olemikey (a regular here)
 
In the article it addresses (taken from the article): “The Copyright Act gives photographers three months after the first publication of a photograph to register their copyrights and recover statutory damages of up to $150,000, plus attorney’s fees and other costs,” Epstein told Fox News via email. “This means, for example, that photographers and news reporters can publish important news-worthy materials while they are fresh and not have to register the works with the Copyright Office before publishing them. If the law were otherwise, photographers and reporters would have to register their works before they could publish them in order to get the full protection of copyright. This would be a time-consuming exercise and would delay time-sensitive materials from being disseminated to the public.”

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May 3, 2019 10:29:47   #
Blaster34
 
olemikey wrote:
In the article it addresses (taken from the article): “The Copyright Act gives photographers three months after the first publication of a photograph to register their copyrights and recover statutory damages of up to $150,000, plus attorney’s fees and other costs,” Epstein told Fox News via email. “This means, for example, that photographers and news reporters can publish important news-worthy materials while they are fresh and not have to register the works with the Copyright Office before publishing them. If the law were otherwise, photographers and reporters would have to register their works before they could publish them in order to get the full protection of copyright. This would be a time-consuming exercise and would delay time-sensitive materials from being disseminated to the public.”
In the article it addresses (taken from the articl... (show quote)



Great info, thanks

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May 3, 2019 10:35:41   #
jlocke
 
donrent wrote:
In my opinion once a photo has been published publicly , its fair game.


As noted above, according to the article:

“The Copyright Act gives photographers three months after the first publication of a photograph to register their copyrights and recover statutory damages of up to $150,000, plus attorney’s fees and other costs,”...

So, no, just because it has been published doesn't make it 'yours'.

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