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Ancient Film Guy Trying to Learn Digital
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Apr 16, 2019 11:10:16   #
Maineiac LRK
 
I've been a serious amateur film photographer in all formats, mainly medium format, but also some 35mm and 4x5 view camera for fifty years and have tens of thousands of negs and transparencies in both B&W and color. Switched to digital a few years ago--shoot with Fuji X-Pro 1 and my camera phone. Have Epson V-700 scanner for digitizing film negs and transparencies. Epson 3800 Printer, NEC monitor with Spyder Pro 4 calibrator.

Software: Photoshop 7, Elements 9, Lightroom 4, Corel PhotoPro Ultimate, Corel Aftershot Pro.

Trying to learn the new language of digital in order to be able to use the software intuitively and effectively, and develop a workflow that works for me.

I really miss the hands-on darkroom work, devising chemical formulas, etc. Am making slow progress in digital color printing (B&W from scanned negs is going well). Problem: I find digital post-processing boring as hell, despite my general computer saavyness. So my learning curve is long because I just am not motivated to plow through the books and instruction manuals for the time it takes to really "get it." And I really resist Adobe's to force us to use the annual subscription to cloud-based software. For me, it would be a colossal waste of money, given the number of prints I do. So I'm stuck with the software above which resides on my computer.

I like the Corel PhotoPro pretty well, but Aftershot Pro (which in some ways I like better than Lightroom) doesn't recognize images scanned on my Epson V700 scanner. Corel says there's no cure for it--it's just a feature of their algorithms, not a bug that can be fixed.

So, encouragement, suggestions, kick-in-the-ass--whatever is welcome.

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Apr 16, 2019 11:33:15   #
ORpilot
 
The fujifilm cameras are a great for those that know film and are transitioning to digital. Fuji controls are just like film cameras. When I have a student that has a hard time with all the menus, buttons, and choices on a modern digital camera by the big 3. I introduce them to Fujifilm X-T series. They are immediately right at home. As for your Post processing programs. All of them work but none do everything. If you are having trouble with those programs, The Photos editing program on Windows 10 and on Apple OS are easy to use and good transitions to other PP Programs. I personally find the Apple Photos program will do 95% of all my post processing. It all take practice.

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Apr 16, 2019 11:39:04   #
BlueMorel (a regular here)
 
Welcome! Lots of former and current film users here, so you're in good company. I'm a learn-by-doing person when it comes to software, and my eyes glaze over at points when going by the manual. I do have current Adobe Photoshop/Lightroom software, paid for monthly at a reasonable fee for a hobby (less than what I would pay for a breakfast out a month). The nice thing about Lightroom is that you can try everything to get a feel of what it does without destroying the original image, and segue into other software like PS, etc., and it is easy to manage files.

Since software learning is not your thing, I'd say go with what is your thing - photographing and scanning old images to tweak them or save them, and enjoy that part. If you're stuck on a software part, there is plenty of help here and plenty of short tutorials on really specific issues on the internet.

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Apr 16, 2019 11:40:52   #
David C.
 
Wow. someone else in the exact same situation. The love of film photography and the great cameras and glass that goes with it...and now, new equipment, language, and technical approach to the hobby.
I wish you well. I find every photo excursion is a learning curve for me. The one advantage to the digital format is that now I can review my photos on the computer, at will. Still not comfortable with printing and cropping but as I said, it is a learning curve. I am a computer user but not a pro by any means. Thank you for your comments about Corel PhotoPro, This program has come up a few times in the past as being user friendly. David C.
PS: I went for a drive into Vermont this past Sunday. Took my Leica R3 and after taking some photos my wife asked to see them... I had to reminder her of film vs: digital which has become so common with
just about everyone now.

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Apr 16, 2019 11:58:28   #
captain ugly
 
I also am an old film person. I found digital has many variables between products to be learned with any ease. From one camera model or software to create an image requires a road map to arrive at your goal. I found it best to keep it simple and just try to master one programs software, one camera model. Yep! it is harder then just knowing what film speed, f stop, focus, to use. The darkroom is now the computer and it too has many variables. The reward is instant gratification when you see your version of the final image. Good luck.

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Apr 16, 2019 12:05:01   #
suntouched
 
Welcome!

Post processing isn't my favorite thing to do either.
However having the proper tools makes the job easier.

Pay now (subscription) or pay later (for updates) or work with outdated software to save money. I don't know of free software that will meet your needs- but there are members here that can help.

Even if think you aren't doing enough to justify a subscription, if you had software that worked for you, you might do more.

I use PS, LR, Camera Raw- subscription based. I know the updated LR will work your scanned files.

I also "own" Luminar and OnOne. They offer ongoing tutorials that might be the answer. As both software programs get larger they get more complicated to use.

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Apr 16, 2019 12:10:00   #
burkphoto (a regular here)
 
Maineiac LRK wrote:
I've been a serious amateur film photographer in all formats, mainly medium format, but also some 35mm and 4x5 view camera for fifty years and have tens of thousands of negs and transparencies in both B&W and color. Switched to digital a few years ago--shoot with Fuji X-Pro 1 and my camera phone. Have Epson V-700 scanner for digitizing film negs and transparencies. Epson 3800 Printer, NEC monitor with Spyder Pro 4 calibrator.

Software: Photoshop 7, Elements 9, Lightroom 4, Corel PhotoPro Ultimate, Corel Aftershot Pro.

Trying to learn the new language of digital in order to be able to use the software intuitively and effectively, and develop a workflow that works for me.

I really miss the hands-on darkroom work, devising chemical formulas, etc. Am making slow progress in digital color printing (B&W from scanned negs is going well). Problem: I find digital post-processing boring as hell, despite my general computer saavyness. So my learning curve is long because I just am not motivated to plow through the books and instruction manuals for the time it takes to really "get it." And I really resist Adobe's to force us to use the annual subscription to cloud-based software. For me, it would be a colossal waste of money, given the number of prints I do. So I'm stuck with the software above which resides on my computer.

I like the Corel PhotoPro pretty well, but Aftershot Pro (which in some ways I like better than Lightroom) doesn't recognize images scanned on my Epson V700 scanner. Corel says there's no cure for it--it's just a feature of their algorithms, not a bug that can be fixed.

So, encouragement, suggestions, kick-in-the-ass--whatever is welcome.
I've been a serious amateur film photographer in a... (show quote)


Welcome to UHH!

I've been a very serious photographer and sometime pro since 1969. The best thing that ever happened to me was living through the transition from film to digital in a pro photo lab (where I had nine different roles in 33 years). I had a foundation in photography, and found all the analogies to film in the digital world. It accelerated everything!

Because of that, I can honestly say digital capture is far more useful to me than film capture ever was. I even like the look of it better. I especially like working with images on the computer, as compared to working with them in my old darkroom. With bits and bytes, I can get to the results I want faster, more accurately, and without pollution or wasting any money on atoms that have to be discarded due to mistakes.

The evolution of computers and software is very rapid. That's why the major software companies are all going to the subscription model, which I support fully. I have the Adobe Photography Bundle and Microsoft Office 365 on my systems. It truly is a joy to be 100% up to date on all those apps. Software is all online, now, available from application stores. CD? DVD? Forget about those! Everything is on the Internet.

I generally buy a new computer every five to seven years. I primarily use Mac OS (I run Windows 10 on my Mac when needed). I'm able to use 2012 and 2013 computers with the very latest operating systems. When that becomes impossible, I'll start planning to buy a new or more recent, gently used computer. I recently retired my 2010 Mac Mini to the living room for use as a media center. It replaced a DVD recorder/player, since it was the last Mini to have an optical drive in it.

I hear you about reading manuals... I spent many years writing what most of my customers considered good ones. They are necessary evils. However, if you can watch videos on YouTube, you can find suitable sources for most of what you need to know.

Dig in... it is worth it! I know learning sometimes feels like scratching your way through a brick wall with a pocket knife, but on the other side of the wall is this HUGE toy store of things to keep you busy and useful and having fun for life!

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Apr 16, 2019 12:43:16   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
Welcome to the forum.
I too was a film guy from 1972.
While I do miss my B&W darkroom, editing digital is so easy. I sometimes do it while watching TV.
Not being restricted to X rolls of film and waiting for the slides to be develop is neat too!
Don't worry, you'll get there.

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Apr 16, 2019 13:41:20   #
rgrenaderphoto (a regular here)
 
Maineiac LRK wrote:
I've been a serious amateur film photographer in all formats, mainly medium format, but also some 35mm and 4x5 view camera for fifty years and have tens of thousands of negs and transparencies in both B&W and color. Switched to digital a few years ago--shoot with Fuji X-Pro 1 and my camera phone. Have Epson V-700 scanner for digitizing film negs and transparencies. Epson 3800 Printer, NEC monitor with Spyder Pro 4 calibrator.

Software: Photoshop 7, Elements 9, Lightroom 4, Corel PhotoPro Ultimate, Corel Aftershot Pro.

Of all the parts of my workflow, from setting up the camera and tripod, adjusting exposure and taking the image, post processing is my most favorite. It is where my vision for what I captured takes life.

Trying to learn the new language of digital in order to be able to use the software intuitively and effectively, and develop a workflow that works for me.

I really miss the hands-on darkroom work, devising chemical formulas, etc. Am making slow progress in digital color printing (B&W from scanned negs is going well). Problem: I find digital post-processing boring as hell, despite my general computer saavyness. So my learning curve is long because I just am not motivated to plow through the books and instruction manuals for the time it takes to really "get it." And I really resist Adobe's to force us to use the annual subscription to cloud-based software. For me, it would be a colossal waste of money, given the number of prints I do. So I'm stuck with the software above which resides on my computer.

I like the Corel PhotoPro pretty well, but Aftershot Pro (which in some ways I like better than Lightroom) doesn't recognize images scanned on my Epson V700 scanner. Corel says there's no cure for it--it's just a feature of their algorithms, not a bug that can be fixed.

So, encouragement, suggestions, kick-in-the-ass--whatever is welcome.
I've been a serious amateur film photographer in a... (show quote)


You will never reach your full potential in the digital world taking first class images with third rate software.
Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop have incredible printing capabilities, but none of us in the digital world print everything we shoot. We'd all be bankrupted with the cost of inks.

So, but you ego aside and subscribe to the Adobe Creative Cloud. Get familiar with Lightroom Classic CC and Photoshop CC. We know you spend more than $10/month on coffee, so subscribe. Find a local camera store or Community College that offers Lightroom and Photoshop classes.

It is 2019, time to take advantage of the state of technology and improve your work.

| Reply
Apr 16, 2019 22:37:45   #
ORpilot
 
rgrenaderphoto wrote:
You will never reach your full potential in the digital world taking first class images with third rate software.
Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop have incredible printing capabilities, but none of us in the digital world print everything we shoot. We'd all be bankrupted with the cost of inks.

So, but you ego aside and subscribe to the Adobe Creative Cloud. Get familiar with Lightroom Classic CC and Photoshop CC. We know you spend more than $10/month on coffee, so subscribe. Find a local camera store or Community College that offers Lightroom and Photoshop classes.

It is 2019, time to take advantage of the state of technology and improve your work.
You will never reach your full potential in the di... (show quote)


The shot is far more important than the PP software. A great shot is not dependent upon using Adobe products. That would be like saying "only using Kodak Film" will give you a great photograph.

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Apr 16, 2019 22:56:43   #
rgrenaderphoto (a regular here)
 
ORpilot wrote:
The shot is far more important than the PP software. A great shot is not dependent upon using Adobe products. That would be like saying "only using Kodak Film" will give you a great photograph.


Sorry, it is 2019, and with digital photography any image can be improved with minor tweaks.

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Apr 16, 2019 23:50:10   #
ORpilot
 
rgrenaderphoto wrote:
Sorry, it is 2019, and with digital photography any image can be improved with minor tweaks.


True about 2019. But one does not necessarily need to use Adobe products.... You totally missed the point

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Apr 17, 2019 01:01:43   #
rgrenaderphoto (a regular here)
 
..

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Apr 17, 2019 05:38:03   #
joehel2 (a regular here)
 
Welcome to the forum.

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Apr 17, 2019 05:50:19   #
Manglesphoto (a regular here)
 
Maineiac LRK wrote:
I've been a serious amateur film photographer in all formats, mainly medium format, but also some 35mm and 4x5 view camera for fifty years and have tens of thousands of negs and transparencies in both B&W and color. Switched to digital a few years ago--shoot with Fuji X-Pro 1 and my camera phone. Have Epson V-700 scanner for digitizing film negs and transparencies. Epson 3800 Printer, NEC monitor with Spyder Pro 4 calibrator.

Software: Photoshop 7, Elements 9, Lightroom 4, Corel PhotoPro Ultimate, Corel Aftershot Pro.

Trying to learn the new language of digital in order to be able to use the software intuitively and effectively, and develop a workflow that works for me.

I really miss the hands-on darkroom work, devising chemical formulas, etc. Am making slow progress in digital color printing (B&W from scanned negs is going well). Problem: I find digital post-processing boring as hell, despite my general computer saavyness. So my learning curve is long because I just am not motivated to plow through the books and instruction manuals for the time it takes to really "get it." And I really resist Adobe's to force us to use the annual subscription to cloud-based software. For me, it would be a colossal waste of money, given the number of prints I do. So I'm stuck with the software above which resides on my computer.

I like the Corel PhotoPro pretty well, but Aftershot Pro (which in some ways I like better than Lightroom) doesn't recognize images scanned on my Epson V700 scanner. Corel says there's no cure for it--it's just a feature of their algorithms, not a bug that can be fixed.

So, encouragement, suggestions, kick-in-the-ass--whatever is welcome.
I've been a serious amateur film photographer in a... (show quote)

I was in the same boat when I went digital, I found shooting digital was a lot like slide film but without the narrow exposure latitude. Best learned by trial and error, It cost nothing but a little time to experiment.

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