Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Would love feedback on bridge camera replacement
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
Page: <<prev 1 2 3 4 5 next>>
Apr 16, 2019 05:29:46   #
joncogar
 
Robg wrote:
This forum was recommended to me by a friend, and it looks to me to be quite interesting and useful.

By way of introduction, my principal interest in photography is for travel, and especially nature photography. I started with a simple Brownie flash camera as a teenager, including making my own contact prints. My high school graduation present was a fixed lens 35mm Minolta and later in my twenties I set up a small darkroom and got my first SLR. Shifting to an SLR turns out to have been a mistake as I wasn't ready to deal with all of the lens swapping, the associated costs, nor the heavy equipment bag I had to lug around and my interest in photography waned. Contributing factors were that my career and bringing up three children ate up most of my time.

Six years ago I started to gradually retire after a long career in IT. With partial retirement came the opportunity to travel, an African safari motivated me to find a good camera and so was delighted to see that there were now so-called super zoom bridge cameras that eliminated many of the negatives (to me) of the SLR. Also, not having paid much attention to photography for several decades, I was amazed with many of the technological advancements such as AF, anti-shake, automatic HDR, automatic bracketing, burst shooting, having video capabilities in a still camera and the ability to simultaneously take stills while filming video. So I purchased a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200. What differentiated the FZ200 from the rest of the pack was the constant aperture of f2.8 throughout the entire 25-600mm range. Back in my SLR days having that kind of aperture at 600mm was unimaginable, and now I had it in a zoom!

For nature photography, the zoom, aperture and built-in anti-shake features enabled me to take some great wildlife photos on that African trip. There was no need for a tri-pod even at 600mm because the large aperture enabled fast shutter speeds and any remaining issues were usually compensated for by the anti-shake.

After 6 years I need to repair or replace the FZ200. The zoom lever that surrounds the shutter has stopped functioning, although I can use an alternate zoom lever/button on the lens barrel. However, I would prefer to use the one near the shutter. Also, I have the feeling that the AF is not working as well as when the camera was new. Maybe there is dust on the sensor or elsewhere inside the camera body?

So, I've narrowed it down to three choices - get the FZ200 repaired, purchase an FZ300, or purchase the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 IV. I recognize that the Sony is far, far more expensive than the other two options, but for now let's ignore that.

Given that the FZ300 market price is around $400, I'm not sure that repair, which I would expect to probably cost in the $100-200 range, is worth pursuing. Particularly because there are new features in the FZ300 (WiFi, improved AF, dust/water resistance) that have value to me. From specs and reviews, the Sony has a much larger sensor, 70% more pixels, and a wider range of video options. Negatives for the Sony are that it weighs 14 oz. more, and at 600mm it stops down to F4 (vs remaining at F2.8 for the FZ300). Clearly, the biggest advantage in the Sony is in the sensor and the biggest disadvantage is probably the weight as I'll be wearing it around my neck for up to 10 hours a day.

I'd love to hear some opinions!

Here are some of my photos and feedback would be most welcome.

-Rob
This forum was recommended to me by a friend, and ... (show quote)


The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 IV. Is by far the best bridge camera today. Large sensor and blazing fast focus. Pros are starting to use this camera as a secondary.

| Reply
Apr 16, 2019 06:52:43   #
Robg
 
hpucker99 wrote:
Last summer, I rented the Sony RX10III for 10 days

If in doubt, just rent the camera from Borrowlenses or Lensrental.


Renting - excellent idea. Thanks for the suggestion!

| Reply
Apr 16, 2019 06:59:43   #
Silverman
 
Robg wrote:
This forum was recommended to me by a friend, and it looks to me to be quite interesting and useful.

By way of introduction, my principal interest in photography is for travel, and especially nature photography. I started with a simple Brownie flash camera as a teenager, including making my own contact prints. My high school graduation present was a fixed lens 35mm Minolta and later in my twenties I set up a small darkroom and got my first SLR. Shifting to an SLR turns out to have been a mistake as I wasn't ready to deal with all of the lens swapping, the associated costs, nor the heavy equipment bag I had to lug around and my interest in photography waned. Contributing factors were that my career and bringing up three children ate up most of my time.

Six years ago I started to gradually retire after a long career in IT. With partial retirement came the opportunity to travel, an African safari motivated me to find a good camera and so was delighted to see that there were now so-called super zoom bridge cameras that eliminated many of the negatives (to me) of the SLR. Also, not having paid much attention to photography for several decades, I was amazed with many of the technological advancements such as AF, anti-shake, automatic HDR, automatic bracketing, burst shooting, having video capabilities in a still camera and the ability to simultaneously take stills while filming video. So I purchased a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200. What differentiated the FZ200 from the rest of the pack was the constant aperture of f2.8 throughout the entire 25-600mm range. Back in my SLR days having that kind of aperture at 600mm was unimaginable, and now I had it in a zoom!

For nature photography, the zoom, aperture and built-in anti-shake features enabled me to take some great wildlife photos on that African trip. There was no need for a tri-pod even at 600mm because the large aperture enabled fast shutter speeds and any remaining issues were usually compensated for by the anti-shake.

After 6 years I need to repair or replace the FZ200. The zoom lever that surrounds the shutter has stopped functioning, although I can use an alternate zoom lever/button on the lens barrel. However, I would prefer to use the one near the shutter. Also, I have the feeling that the AF is not working as well as when the camera was new. Maybe there is dust on the sensor or elsewhere inside the camera body?

So, I've narrowed it down to three choices - get the FZ200 repaired, purchase an FZ300, or purchase the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 IV. I recognize that the Sony is far, far more expensive than the other two options, but for now let's ignore that.

Given that the FZ300 market price is around $400, I'm not sure that repair, which I would expect to probably cost in the $100-200 range, is worth pursuing. Particularly because there are new features in the FZ300 (WiFi, improved AF, dust/water resistance) that have value to me. From specs and reviews, the Sony has a much larger sensor, 70% more pixels, and a wider range of video options. Negatives for the Sony are that it weighs 14 oz. more, and at 600mm it stops down to F4 (vs remaining at F2.8 for the FZ300). Clearly the biggest advantage in the Sony is in the sensor and the biggest disadvantage is probably the weight as I'll be wearing it around my neck for up to 10 hours a day.

I'd love to hear some opinions!

Here are some of my photos and feedback would be most welcome.

-Rob
This forum was recommended to me by a friend, and ... (show quote)


Before my Nikon DSLR, I owned a quality Panasonic Lumix P&S Camera that took great images. I highly recommend this brand.

| Reply
Apr 16, 2019 07:18:14   #
neilds37
 
hpucker99 wrote:
My first bridge camera was also the Panasonic FZ200, had it for about 4 years. I didn't like the manual focussing control on the FZ200; it was difficult in my hands, otherwise a great camera.

Last summer, I rented the Sony RX10III for 10 days and enjoyed the camera very much. I sold the FZ200 and bought the newer RX10IV when it came out. When going on long day trips, I just take that camera. I also found that this camera was great when shooting lunar and solar eclipses. One thing I haven't tried with the camera is birding, so I haven't had experience on how it tracks.

If in doubt, just rent the camera from Borrowlenses or Lensrental.
My first bridge camera was also the Panasonic FZ20... (show quote)


The auto-track feature for BIF is amazing. Lock on, and just keep the bird in the viewfinder while you click away.

| Reply
Apr 16, 2019 07:41:27   #
MikeMck (a regular here)
 
Robg wrote:
This forum was recommended to me by a friend, and it looks to me to be quite interesting and useful.

By way of introduction, my principal interest in photography is for travel, and especially nature photography. I started with a simple Brownie flash camera as a teenager, including making my own contact prints. My high school graduation present was a fixed lens 35mm Minolta and later in my twenties I set up a small darkroom and got my first SLR. Shifting to an SLR turns out to have been a mistake as I wasn't ready to deal with all of the lens swapping, the associated costs, nor the heavy equipment bag I had to lug around and my interest in photography waned. Contributing factors were that my career and bringing up three children ate up most of my time.

Six years ago I started to gradually retire after a long career in IT. With partial retirement came the opportunity to travel, an African safari motivated me to find a good camera and so was delighted to see that there were now so-called super zoom bridge cameras that eliminated many of the negatives (to me) of the SLR. Also, not having paid much attention to photography for several decades, I was amazed with many of the technological advancements such as AF, anti-shake, automatic HDR, automatic bracketing, burst shooting, having video capabilities in a still camera and the ability to simultaneously take stills while filming video. So I purchased a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200. What differentiated the FZ200 from the rest of the pack was the constant aperture of f2.8 throughout the entire 25-600mm range. Back in my SLR days having that kind of aperture at 600mm was unimaginable, and now I had it in a zoom!

For nature photography, the zoom, aperture and built-in anti-shake features enabled me to take some great wildlife photos on that African trip. There was no need for a tri-pod even at 600mm because the large aperture enabled fast shutter speeds and any remaining issues were usually compensated for by the anti-shake.

After 6 years I need to repair or replace the FZ200. The zoom lever that surrounds the shutter has stopped functioning, although I can use an alternate zoom lever/button on the lens barrel. However, I would prefer to use the one near the shutter. Also, I have the feeling that the AF is not working as well as when the camera was new. Maybe there is dust on the sensor or elsewhere inside the camera body?

So, I've narrowed it down to three choices - get the FZ200 repaired, purchase an FZ300, or purchase the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 IV. I recognize that the Sony is far, far more expensive than the other two options, but for now let's ignore that.

Given that the FZ300 market price is around $400, I'm not sure that repair, which I would expect to probably cost in the $100-200 range, is worth pursuing. Particularly because there are new features in the FZ300 (WiFi, improved AF, dust/water resistance) that have value to me. From specs and reviews, the Sony has a much larger sensor, 70% more pixels, and a wider range of video options. Negatives for the Sony are that it weighs 14 oz. more, and at 600mm it stops down to F4 (vs remaining at F2.8 for the FZ300). Clearly the biggest advantage in the Sony is in the sensor and the biggest disadvantage is probably the weight as I'll be wearing it around my neck for up to 10 hours a day.

I'd love to hear some opinions!

Here are some of my photos and feedback would be most welcome.

-Rob
This forum was recommended to me by a friend, and ... (show quote)


No question go with the Sony!

| Reply
Apr 16, 2019 07:50:58   #
ELNikkor (a regular here)
 
The FZ300 does everything the FZ200 did, plus some nice upgrades. Good that they stuck with the 12mp sensor, too. i'd stick with the Panasonic, for around $400, just can't beat what it can do!

| Reply
Apr 16, 2019 08:00:09   #
Low Budget Dave
 
Great pictures.

The two logical choices to me would be the Sony RX10 (IV), and the Panasonic FZ2500. Both are fantastic cameras. The Panasonic is a little cheaper (although neither is particularly cheap), and the Panasonic features a built-in ND filter.

The Sony features a (relatively insane) 1000 FPS slow motion, but the 120 FPS on the Panasonic is more than enough. The Sony max aperture is F2.4, but the 2.8 on the Panasonic is almost the same in the real world.

The Sony goes up to 600mm, but the 480 mm on the Panasonic is pretty similar. If you are used to the Panasonic, I would seriously consider the FZ2500.

As you mentioned, the improvements in technology over the last few years have been amazing, but the FZ2500 (which is now two years old) is still running neck-and-neck with the Sony.

| Reply
Apr 16, 2019 08:27:12   #
mizzee (a regular here)
 
I would go with the fz300. You already know the camera and will be better able to take advantage of the newer functionalities. With the Sony, you're starting from scratch where it will take you awhile just to get to know where everything is. There's also a lot to be said for 2.4 throughout the range.

| Reply
Apr 16, 2019 08:41:26   #
Scruples (a regular here)
 
First, welcome to the forum

Second, beautiful captures. But a light critique. Crop the big cats. I like them relaxed(!) and I really don't need to see the ground they are laying on.

Third, I hope I didn't offend you.

Fourth, this is most important. You take great photographs, not the camera.

Fifth,
With that being written, try to minimize all the variables with your photography. Upgrade to another Panasonic LUMIX. Don't try to improve your photography by increasing the learning curve and getting a different make and model of camera.

I am a Canon Kid (old man!). I trust what I know rather than upgrade to a different camera manufacturer.

As for your old camera, repair it and donate it to your local high school. You can begin to foster a new generation of this photographers. There is a greater joy in sharing your skill, talent and equipment with someone eager to learn.

I still love your captures and am happy the big cats are resting!!

Happy Shooting.

| Reply
Apr 16, 2019 08:55:40   #
ShutterbugGram
 
As a retired real estate appraiser, I have a deep appreciation for all that a quality bridge camera can do. We’ve owned a Minolta rangefinder, two Olympus cameras, and three digital Panasonics - most recently the FZ300. After using it for several years, I would recommend the FZ2500 due to the larger sensor. Yes, it is a heavier camera and not quite as convenient as the FZ300. But I am frequently frustrated by the noise visible above ISO 400. The other frustration with it is the lack of sharpness in my images. I’m not sure about the main cause. I’m seriously considering an upgrade to the Sony, but the cost, weight and my small, arthritic hands keep me hanging on to the FZ300. Good luck!

| Reply
Apr 16, 2019 08:57:17   #
neilds37
 
Another feature of the Sony is the build. I do not know what the Lumix is capable of, but I do know about the Sony. Although I DO NOT advocate testing a camera in this manner, due to a side-effect of a new med I have dropped the Sony from a seated position on to a carpeted floor three or four times without any damage, in or out, when I dozed off. Now a wrist-strap goes on before the camera is picked up.

| Reply
Apr 16, 2019 09:23:23   #
dbjazz
 
By all means, get the FZ300. You already know how to get the most from it.

| Reply
Apr 16, 2019 09:37:28   #
Low Budget Dave
 
neilds37 wrote:
Another feature of the Sony is the build. I do not know what the Lumix is capable of, but I do know about the Sony. Although I DO NOT advocate testing a camera in this manner, due to a side-effect of a new med I have dropped the Sony from a seated position on to a carpeted floor three or four times without any damage, in or out, when I dozed off. Now a wrist-strap goes on before the camera is picked up.


Ha, I am with you. I do "impact tests" on some of my equipment from time to time as well.

| Reply
Apr 16, 2019 09:48:42   #
mas24
 
Robg wrote:
This forum was recommended to me by a friend, and it looks to me to be quite interesting and useful.

By way of introduction, my principal interest in photography is for travel, and especially nature photography. I started with a simple Brownie flash camera as a teenager, including making my own contact prints. My high school graduation present was a fixed lens 35mm Minolta and later in my twenties I set up a small darkroom and got my first SLR. Shifting to an SLR turns out to have been a mistake as I wasn't ready to deal with all of the lens swapping, the associated costs, nor the heavy equipment bag I had to lug around and my interest in photography waned. Contributing factors were that my career and bringing up three children ate up most of my time.

Six years ago I started to gradually retire after a long career in IT. With partial retirement came the opportunity to travel, an African safari motivated me to find a good camera and so was delighted to see that there were now so-called super zoom bridge cameras that eliminated many of the negatives (to me) of the SLR. Also, not having paid much attention to photography for several decades, I was amazed with many of the technological advancements such as AF, anti-shake, automatic HDR, automatic bracketing, burst shooting, having video capabilities in a still camera and the ability to simultaneously take stills while filming video. So I purchased a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200. What differentiated the FZ200 from the rest of the pack was the constant aperture of f2.8 throughout the entire 25-600mm range. Back in my SLR days having that kind of aperture at 600mm was unimaginable, and now I had it in a zoom!

For nature photography, the zoom, aperture and built-in anti-shake features enabled me to take some great wildlife photos on that African trip. There was no need for a tri-pod even at 600mm because the large aperture enabled fast shutter speeds and any remaining issues were usually compensated for by the anti-shake.

After 6 years I need to repair or replace the FZ200. The zoom lever that surrounds the shutter has stopped functioning, although I can use an alternate zoom lever/button on the lens barrel. However, I would prefer to use the one near the shutter. Also, I have the feeling that the AF is not working as well as when the camera was new. Maybe there is dust on the sensor or elsewhere inside the camera body?

So, I've narrowed it down to three choices - get the FZ200 repaired, purchase an FZ300, or purchase the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 IV. I recognize that the Sony is far, far more expensive than the other two options, but for now let's ignore that.

Given that the FZ300 market price is around $400, I'm not sure that repair, which I would expect to probably cost in the $100-200 range, is worth pursuing. Particularly because there are new features in the FZ300 (WiFi, improved AF, dust/water resistance) that have value to me. From specs and reviews, the Sony has a much larger sensor, 70% more pixels, and a wider range of video options. Negatives for the Sony are that it weighs 14 oz. more, and at 600mm it stops down to F4 (vs remaining at F2.8 for the FZ300). Clearly the biggest advantage in the Sony is in the sensor and the biggest disadvantage is probably the weight as I'll be wearing it around my neck for up to 10 hours a day.

I'd love to hear some opinions!

Here are some of my photos and feedback would be most welcome.

-Rob
This forum was recommended to me by a friend, and ... (show quote)


Welcome to the forum. You posted some great wildlife photos. Sony and Panasonic are generally the first and second choices for Bridge cameras. I own a 4 year old 16 megapixels Nikon Bridge camera, that has a focal range to 855mm. I looked at a Panasonic FZ70 at Best Buy Store about 3 years ago. It was a clearance sale. Less than $200, including sales taxes, brand new. I regret not buying it now. Getting the FZ200 repaired probably will be expensive. You might as well get another Panasonic Bridge camera. Defective cameras can be sold for parts on eBay. You won't get a lot selling defective cameras. But something is always better than nothing. Good luck.

| Reply
Apr 16, 2019 09:55:41   #
SuperflyTNT (a regular here)
 
gtilford wrote:
I used the FZ300 for the better part of a year and enjoyed it very much and got some great photos out of it as long as I had good light. Also the FZ300 does have a macro function that works very well if you decide to try your hand a macro. I upgraded to the Panasonic g85 just because it and the FZ300 are almost identical for menus and setup so it was an easy learning curve and it gave me a bigger sensor but I would not hesitate to shoot with the FZ300 again.


I've never used any of the FZ models, but I picked up a G85 in January and found ti a joy to shoot. The menus are extensive, but once you're set up the on camera controls are almost intuitive. I'm actually getting ready to sell the G85, but only because I decided to upgrade to the G9, (and I also just picked up a Nikon D500 body), and decided I can't really justify keeping the G85 too.

| Reply
Page: <<prev 1 2 3 4 5 next>>
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2019 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.