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Mar 21, 2019 08:36:09   #
Eyeman
 
Hello gang... I am a long-time UH stalker that finally would like a group response. We were burned out in the northern California Camp fire, and I am slowly rebuilding my gear, hence the excuse for 'replacing' my camera :>). For years I used a UV filter to protect my lenses from mechanical damage until a pro whom I respect said 'oh no.. that degrades your images'. But now with two shiny new lenses, how much really do I need to worry about that ? Thanks for your responses in advance !!

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Mar 21, 2019 08:44:09   #
CPR
 
When I was working press the filter over the lens was a necessity. Now, I just keep the lens caps on and be careful. My skill level, or lack thereof, does not allow for any additional challenges.

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Mar 21, 2019 08:46:07   #
Eyeman
 
Thanks :>)

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Mar 21, 2019 08:48:33   #
Rich1939 (a regular here)
 
Eyeman wrote:
Hello gang... I am a long-time UH stalker that finally would like a group response. We were burned out in the northern California Camp fire, and I am slowly rebuilding my gear, hence the excuse for 'replacing' my camera :>). For years I used a UV filter to protect my lenses from mechanical damage until a pro whom I respect said 'oh no.. that degrades your images'. But now with two shiny new lenses, how much really do I need to worry about that ? Thanks for your responses in advance !!


Did you ever break a UV filter in the past? I've been toting a camera around since the 60's and never had an incident. Bumped a few lens caps which provide some degree protection and which stay on the lens until just before shooting when the camera is firmly in hand or on a tripod. Also before shooting a lens hood is often in place.
No matter how good a filter is there will be be some degree of image change when it is on your camera. Usually insignificant and some more than others.I always feel better knowing there is no possibility of degradation.

PS: If you can't resist using a filter for protection, a UV isn't requires with today's digitals. Get a clear filter but a good one.

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Mar 21, 2019 08:48:38   #
JohnSwanda (a regular here)
 
This issue has been discussed endlessly here. There are good arguments on both sides. Personally, I have never used a "protection" filter, just the lens hood, and cap when not shooting, and I've never damaged a lens. A cheap filter may degrade the image, so if you decide to use one, get a good one.

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Mar 21, 2019 08:53:27   #
camerapapi (a regular here)
 
Use the lens cap and the lens shade. You do not need a UV filter for "protection."

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Mar 21, 2019 08:59:35   #
Country Boy (a regular here)
 
I would suggest you go out and shoot a number of photos then attach a filter and repeat the same photos. Print them and put them together and use your own judgment as to the amount of difference you can observe. For me, I have them on my lens and could be my eyes but I don't see any quality impact! you be the judge!

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Mar 21, 2019 09:06:28   #
Eyeman
 
Wow...thanks to all... all good answers too... I have also never in decades bashed by lens directly, which leads me in the direction of no filter... and careful cleaning of the dust that coats all of us as we wander :>). How do y'all do that ?

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Mar 21, 2019 09:08:22   #
Rich1939 (a regular here)
 
Eyeman wrote:
Wow...thanks to all... all good answers too... I have also never in decades bashed by lens directly, which leads me in the direction of no filter... and careful cleaning of the dust that coats all of us as we wander :>). How do y'all do that ?


I keep a Rocket blower in my bag and that handles almost all dust problems

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Mar 21, 2019 09:14:30   #
DirtFarmer (a regular here)
 
There are times to use a protection filter, but most of the time it's not necessary. A lens cap will protect your lens from impacts.
Modern digital cameras do not require a UV filter. If you need protection a clear glass filter will do the job.
Just be sure to get a good quality one so you don't degrade the optics.
Times to use a protection filter will include things like salt spray, blowing sand and flying mud. Maybe the occasional food fight.

My camera has hit the ground once. Lens down. It was on a tripod and wind blew it all over. Lens hood hit the ground, nothing on the lens.

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Mar 21, 2019 09:18:49   #
47greyfox (a regular here)
 
True confession moment. For almost every lens I’ve ever bought, I’ve also purchased a kit containing a UV, ND, and CP filter. Other than occasional use of the CP, the rest are still in their original packaging. I use a hood.... and that’s it. In 35 years, I’ve never had an incident.

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Mar 21, 2019 09:21:55   #
cedymock (a regular here)
 
Hello Eyeman welcome to UHH
Three reasons I no longer use lens filters for protection;
Keeping the lens hood on always- probably does more good as for lens safety
Lens Flairs - I can’t ever remember to take it off if shooting any sun or light shots
Last -purchase insurance on my camera equipment small cost for not worrying
All learned from research UHH and other photographers

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Mar 21, 2019 09:35:31   #
orrie smith
 
Eyeman wrote:
Hello gang... I am a long-time UH stalker that finally would like a group response. We were burned out in the northern California Camp fire, and I am slowly rebuilding my gear, hence the excuse for 'replacing' my camera :>). For years I used a UV filter to protect my lenses from mechanical damage until a pro whom I respect said 'oh no.. that degrades your images'. But now with two shiny new lenses, how much really do I need to worry about that ? Thanks for your responses in advance !!


Trial and error. Buy an inexpensive UV filter for one of your lenses, set your camera up on a tripod, take a few pics with and without the filter, compare image quality. As long as you are not dragging your camera and equipment through the brush, I see no need for the filter, but that is up to each individual.

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Mar 21, 2019 09:38:08   #
tomcat
 
Eyeman wrote:
Hello gang... I am a long-time UH stalker that finally would like a group response. We were burned out in the northern California Camp fire, and I am slowly rebuilding my gear, hence the excuse for 'replacing' my camera :>). For years I used a UV filter to protect my lenses from mechanical damage until a pro whom I respect said 'oh no.. that degrades your images'. But now with two shiny new lenses, how much really do I need to worry about that ? Thanks for your responses in advance !!


I always get a clear glass filter for all of my lenses. I don't use UV either, unless I need one in the mountains. Nikon calls them "NC" filters. And yes, I have broken them, the last one happening when I hit a guard rail mount while climbing down an embankment.

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Mar 21, 2019 09:42:49   #
CHG_CANON (a regular here)
 
Filters are a personnel choice. And yet, you'll get responses like it's as important as who you'll vote for in 2020. The better filters use better glass and advanced coatings. The UV aspect has a subtle, but real, impact on shooting in certain situations. Cleaning off dust and grime is easier than from the lens surface directly. If you think you might want to sell your lens at some point in the future, a filter protecting that front glass is the best way to go. Some 'clear' filters are so clear you almost need to tap it with your finger to confirm there's actually something there. Consider clear is you're concerned about UV and just want protection.

The link below shows a technical analysis of many different filter brands / models from a respected author. I'm of the opinion that if your photography is impacted by a 0.3% loss of light transmission and this 0.3% loss is of greater impact than the positive aspects of a filter, then you shouldn't be using filters. It's your photography; it's your choice. In my own equation, the value of my equipment is higher and at higher risk than a potential 0.3% loss of light transmission, particularly when such a "loss" is applied to the sharpest lenses and shooting technique.

https://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2017/06/the-comprehensive-ranking-of-the-major-uv-filters-on-the-market/ (<<- note the hyper-links in the first paragraph to related posts and read those too.)

This second article gives a good demonstration of the visual effects of various types of filters. I live and shoot near and over a Great Lake and have UV filters on most of my lenses and have them on at all times. Note the subtle and real impact of each type of filter in their typical usage situations. Note their usefulness and visual impact is not limited to altitudes above 5000 feet.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora/photography/buying-guide/a-guide-to-filters-for-lenses

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