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Mar 14, 2019 06:18:35   #
ajpag
 
So I’ve been a member here for a while and read the posts almost daily, I’ve learned a lot over the time; been shooting since the 60’s started out with a twin lens but not sure of the exact model, top viewfinder and I recall 120 film, then moved on to a Nikkormat (wow, color) with a 24, a 50 1.4 (my favorite), a I think it was a 175 and a Panagor tele don’t remember which though but that’s what age does, and it seemed as though I shot just about every 35 film ever made (mostly slides, still have thousands packed away, be interesting to see how they survived all these years with all of Life’s changes) Anyway today shooting on a Nikon 7000, all the props, Love it, no problems, first year shot 16K plus, spec’d and built a great desktop with all the needs covered, except, Now moving into video and have seen some awesome work done with a 7000, Figure high speed cards might be the ticket and I guess we’ll soon see how the buffer performs... My question to all of you, is does LR work with these types of files. Figure I’d ask before I started fumbling around. I pay many of you compliments, I read these posts and a lot of you know all the technical stuff, and though I think I might know a lot, there’s always someone who knows more; now granted not dismissing my own work, I’ve won a fair amount of awards (not bragging) and have taken a lot of Great shots over the years and because having done it for as long as I have, following my gut, instinct and some early direction, You pretty much know how to “get the shot” . Thanks in advance for your replies...

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Mar 14, 2019 11:22:45   #
bsprague (a regular here)
 
Yes, Lightroom manages video files from common cameras. I routinely shoot a mix of video and stills on the same camera and card. I use Lightroom to move them to my computer, catalog and review both types.

What can I help with?

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Mar 14, 2019 17:12:25   #
Bobspez (a regular here)
 
Video is just a succession of still shots, thousands of them, so everything you know about about using the D7000 applies to video as well. However video also has sound recording, so that is something new to understand and learn. And video and sound are often enhanced in post production which is done in a video and sound editing program. If you ever wondered why a 2 hour movie takes six months of editing, you'll find out when you start to shoot video. As a hobby I create 3 to 4 minute music videos and it generally takes a few minutes to shoot and then six to 10 hours or so to edit and render. That said, there's as much or more art in editing as there is in shooting.

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Mar 15, 2019 11:15:49   #
burkphoto (a regular here)
 
ajpag wrote:
So I’ve been a member here for a while and read the posts almost daily, I’ve learned a lot over the time; been shooting since the 60’s started out with a twin lens but not sure of the exact model, top viewfinder and I recall 120 film, then moved on to a Nikkormat (wow, color) with a 24, a 50 1.4 (my favorite), a I think it was a 175 and a Panagor tele don’t remember which though but that’s what age does, and it seemed as though I shot just about every 35 film ever made (mostly slides, still have thousands packed away, be interesting to see how they survived all these years with all of Life’s changes) Anyway today shooting on a Nikon 7000, all the props, Love it, no problems, first year shot 16K plus, spec’d and built a great desktop with all the needs covered, except, Now moving into video and have seen some awesome work done with a 7000, Figure high speed cards might be the ticket and I guess we’ll soon see how the buffer performs... My question to all of you, is does LR work with these types of files. Figure I’d ask before I started fumbling around. I pay many of you compliments, I read these posts and a lot of you know all the technical stuff, and though I think I might know a lot, there’s always someone who knows more; now granted not dismissing my own work, I’ve won a fair amount of awards (not bragging) and have taken a lot of Great shots over the years and because having done it for as long as I have, following my gut, instinct and some early direction, You pretty much know how to “get the shot” . Thanks in advance for your replies...
So I’ve been a member here for a while and read th... (show quote)


Welcome!

I’m a long-time Lightroom user, but have found its video capabilities very limiting! I use an iMac, and Apple iMovie came free with it. iMovie is PLENTY for most simple projects. I made about 80 training modules in earlier versions of it, 10-15 years ago. The latest version is far more capable and MUCH easier to use.

I also use Final Cut Pro X, but only for complex productions.

I use Apple’s free Garage Band to record/edit sound for video. It’s very capable... and it uses all the third-party audio processing plug-ins you can afford, if you need them.

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Mar 15, 2019 11:37:54   #
bsprague (a regular here)
 
Bill,

Lightroom's editing capabilities are indeed limited. But, within those limits are some surprises. Within the Library module the "Quick Develop" adjustments can be used. Double clicking will open an editor for clip trimming. Once the clips are ready, the Slideshow module can combine the video clips and output and MP4, even with a music track and titles. In other words, someone used to a Lightroom workflow that wants to make home videos does not need additional software or climb a learning curve until they want to get fancier.

My point above was aimed at what I thought was the actual question. Lightroom manages video clip files exactly the same as photo files when it comes to importing, storing, locating files, etc. There is also a workflow withing Lightroom to send clip copies to a project for a true video editing program like FCP or Premiere. You can gather up a collection of video clips and send them to a project.

If the OP is not an Apple addict, Windows also has a video editor. Older Windows versions had "Windows Movie Maker". Windows 10 has video editing baked into the included "Photos" application.

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Mar 15, 2019 12:28:44   #
burkphoto (a regular here)
 
bsprague wrote:
Bill,

Lightroom's editing capabilities are indeed limited. But, within those limits are some surprises. Within the Library module the "Quick Develop" adjustments can be used. Double clicking will open an editor for clip trimming. Once the clips are ready, the Slideshow module can combine the video clips and output and MP4, even with a music track and titles. In other words, someone used to a Lightroom workflow that wants to make home videos does not need additional software or climb a learning curve until they want to get fancier.

My point above was aimed at what I thought was the actual question. Lightroom manages video clip files exactly the same as photo files when it comes to importing, storing, locating files, etc. There is also a workflow withing Lightroom to send clip copies to a project for a true video editing program like FCP or Premiere. You can gather up a collection of video clips and send them to a project.

If the OP is not an Apple addict, Windows also has a video editor. Older Windows versions had "Windows Movie Maker". Windows 10 has video editing baked into the included "Photos" application.
Bill, br br Lightroom's editing capabilities are ... (show quote)


Apparently, Windows MovieMaker is still available on the Microsoft support site, but I’m not sure where.

Yes, Lr will do rudimentary editing. But once I figured out Lightroom wouldn’t adjust video picture quality with even the precision of iMovie, I just moved on.

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Mar 15, 2019 23:08:40   #
bsprague (a regular here)
 
burkphoto wrote:
Apparently, Windows MovieMaker is still available on the Microsoft support site, but I’m not sure where.

Yes, Lr will do rudimentary editing. But once I figured out Lightroom wouldn’t adjust video picture quality with even the precision of iMovie, I just moved on.


I don't think you can find Windows Movie Maker on a Microsoft site. And, I didn't say Lightroom was a good video editor. I tried to say that it was a good file manager. I also am trying to say it can make a video if you know the Slideshow workflow. I am not trying to say that it is a "best" video editor.

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Mar 16, 2019 00:09:24   #
burkphoto (a regular here)
 
bsprague wrote:
I don't think you can find Windows Movie Maker on a Microsoft site. And, I didn't say Lightroom was a good video editor. I tried to say that it was a good file manager. I also am trying to say it can make a video if you know the Slideshow workflow. I am not trying to say that it is a "best" video editor.


You’re right — Movie Maker is gone. But there’s a successor.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/18614/windows-essentials

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Mar 16, 2019 11:25:28   #
Bobspez (a regular here)
 
burkphoto wrote:
You’re right — Movie Maker is gone. But there’s a successor.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/18614/windows-essentials


The original Movie Maker was head and shoulders above the new one. It's pure garbage. Just a lot of ads for upgrades in the microsoft store for a product that might actually work. Reminds me of when they put out a free version of Microsoft word and excel with ads.

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Mar 16, 2019 11:25:35   #
bsprague (a regular here)
 
"For similar features, you can upgrade to Windows 10.....the latest version of the Photos app allows you to create and edit videos with music, text, motion, filters, and 3D effects."

One of these days I'm going to try "Photos" to make a video.

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